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  • Airey, John
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Simpson, Zachary
    Multimodal Science and Engineering Teaching: Perspectives from 8ICOM2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The previous international conference on multimodality – 8ICOM – featured two sessions devoted to multimodal, social semiotic approaches to science teaching and learning (c.f. Halliday1978; van Leeuwen 2005, Airey & Linder 2017). What the papers in these sessions shared was the argument that such perspectives on science, and science teaching, can, at least in part, respond to calls to ‘democratize’ science education by recognising diverse sets of semiotic resources and, in so doing, seeking to address impediments to equal participation (Burke et al., 2017). 

    The 8ICOM science sessions were particularly noteworthy given the backdrop against which 8ICOM had been organised. In the months leading up to the conference, South Africa (and Cape Town, in particular) had experienced campus unrest aimed at ‘decolonizing’ higher education in that country. As part of this movement, the phrase #ScienceMustFall briefly trended on social media. This emanated from the claim that ‘science’ is a western, colonial construct that needs to be dismantled and replaced with the teaching of indigenous, African knowledge. Although the #ScienceMustFall slogan has since departed from the wider public consciousness, the questions it raises nonetheless remain: why, and how, should science be taught?  Is science more than just a western colonial construction and, if so, why? And, what can the concept of multimodality offer by way of answering these questions? 

    In this paper, we offer an overview of the multimodal science papers presented in the two sessions at 8ICOM in the light of these questions. This is done with a view to assessing where the multimodality community finds itself regarding science education, and how it might address questions of the legitimacy of western science in the future. It is thus an attempt, as the conference theme suggests, to ‘move the theory forward’.      

  • de Winter, James
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    The views of pre-service physics teachers on the role of mathematics in the teaching and learning of physics2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Mathematics is commonly seen as playing a fundamental role in the understanding of undergraduate physics. However, this role poses challenges for teaching physics at lower levels. In England, increased formal assessment of mathematical skills in national physics examinations has made many teachers (re)consider this issue and their classroom practice. This qualitative study explores how English physics teachers view the physics/mathematics relationship. Our data consists of questionnaires and follow up interviews with an entire cohort of pre-service teachers training at an English university (n=13). Analysis included a line of enquiry on the tension between the value of mathematics in undergraduate physics and its value for teaching physics at school level. There was considerable variation across respondents, some seeing mathematics as integral to understanding school physics, whilst others prioritised conceptual understanding over mathematical formalism. Many noted how their views had changed during training, raising questions for those involved in physics teacher preparation.

  • Larsson, Johanna
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Anna T.
    Lundqvist, Eva
    A Fragmented Training Environment: Discourse Models in the Talk of Physics Teacher Educators2018In: Research in science education, ISSN 0157-244X, E-ISSN 1573-1898Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports the results of an empirical study exploring the discourses of physics teacher educators. We ask how the expressed understandings of a physics teacher education programme in the talk of teacher educators potentially support the identity construction of new teachers. Nine teacher educators from different sections of a physics teacher programme in Sweden were interviewed. The concept of discourse models was used to operationalise how the discourses of the teacher education programme potentially enable the performance of different physics teacher identities. The analysis resulted in the construction of four discourse models that could be seen to be both enabling and limiting the kinds of identity performances trainee physics teachers can enact. Knowledge of the models thus potentially empowers trainee physics teachers to understand the different goals of their educational programme and from there make informed choices about their own particular approach to becoming a professional physics teacher. We also suggest that for teacher educators, knowledge of the discourse models could facilitate making conscious, informed decisions about their own teaching practice.

  • Volkwyn, Trevor S.
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Heijkenskjöld, Filip
    Working with magnetic field to learn about coordinate systems: A social semiotic approach2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the teaching and learning of physics, a wide range of semiotic resources are used, such as spoken and written language, graphs, diagrams, mathematics, hands on work with apparatus, etc. (Lemke, 1998). In this respect it has been argued that there is a critical constellation of semiotic resources that is needed for appropriate construction of any given disciplinary concept (Airey & Linder, 2009; Airey, 2009). In this social semiotic tradition, it is the development of “fluency” in the individual semiotic resource systems and the ease of transduction (movement and coordination of meaning) between the various semiotic resource systems that makes disciplinary learning possible. We report here findings from an interpretive study of physics students working with a laboratory task designed to encourage transduction when learning about coordinate systems. A hand-held electronic measurement device (IOLab) was used to display components of the Earth’s magnetic field in real time. Our intention was for students to experience the movability of coordinate systems by open-ended investigation of dynamic, real-time changes in the x, y and z components displayed on the computer screen as they manipulated the device. Building on earlier work of Fredlund et. al. (2012) our analysis identifies three types of transduction, the last of which is transduction of meaning to a new modality (iconic gesture) not previously used by the students. We suggest this final form of transduction is indicative of what students have learned and offers the teacher a chance to confirm/challenge student conceptions. Our data clearly demonstrates how careful, open-ended task design, coupled with timely instructor questions can leverage the pedagogical affordances (Airey, 2015) of a range of semiotic resources to make physics learning possible. We therefore claim that understanding the roles that different semiotic resources play for physics learning is vital and call for further research in this area.

  • Volkwyn, Trevor S.
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Heijkenskjöld, Filip
    Multimodal Transduction in Upper-secondary School Physics2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we video-filmed upper-secondary physics students working with a laboratory task designed to encourage transduction (Bezemer & Kress 2008) when learning about coordinate systems.

    Students worked in pairs with an electronic measurement device to determine the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field. The device, IOLab, can be held in the hand and moved around. The results of this movement are graphically displayed on a computer screen as changes in the x, y and z components of the Earth’s magnetic field. The students were simply instructed to use the IOLab to find the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field and mark its direction using a red paper arrow.

    A full multimodal transcription of the student interaction was made (Baldry & Thibault 2006). In our analysis of this transcription, three separate transductions of meaning were identified—transduction of meaning potential in the room to the computer screen, transduction of this meaning to the red arrow, and finally transduction into student gestures. We suggest that this final transduction could not have been made without the introduction of the arrow, which functioned as a coordinating hub (Fredlund et al 2012).

    We recommend that teachers should carefully think about the resources in a task that may function as a coordinating hub and should also look for student transductions in their classrooms as confirmation that learning is taking place.

  • Volkwyn, Trevor S.
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Heijkenskjöld, Filip
    Linder, Cedric J.
    Physics students learning about abstract mathematical tools when engaging with “invisible” phenomena2017In: 2017 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings / [ed] L. Ding, A. Traxler, Y. Cao, Cincinnati, Ohio: American Association of Physics Teachers , 2017, p. 408-411Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of physics knowledge of necessity entails a range of semiotic resources, (e.g. specialized language, graphs, algebra, diagrams, equipment, gesture, etc.). In this study we documented physics students' use of different resources when working with an "invisible" phenomenon--magnetic field. Using a social semiotic framework, we show how appropriate coordination of resources not only enabled students to learn something about the Earth's magnetic field, but also about the use of an abstract mathematical tool--coordinate systems. Our work leads us to make three suggestions: 1. The potential for learning physics can be maximized by designing tasks that encourage students to use a specific set of resources.  2. Thought should be put into what this particular set of resources should be and how they may be coordinated. 3. Close attention to the different resources that students use can allow physics teachers to gauge the learning occurring in their classrooms.

  • Volkwyn, Trevor S.
    et al.
    Airey, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gregorcic, Bor
    Heijkenskjöld, Filip
    Linder, Cedric
    Physics students learning about abstract mathematical tools while engaging with “invisible” phenomena2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The construction of physics knowledge of necessity entails a range of semiotic resources, (e.g. specialized language, graphs, algebra, diagrams, equipment, gesture, etc.). In this study we documented physics students' use of different resources when working with an "invisible" phenomenon--magnetic field. Using a social semiotic framework, we show how appropriate coordination of resources not only enabled students to learn something about the Earth's magnetic field, but also about the use of an abstract mathematical tool--coordinate systems. Our work leads us to make three suggestions: 

    1. The potential for learning physics can be maximized by designing tasks that encourage students to use a specific set of resources. 

    2. Thought should be put into what this particular set of resources should be and how they may be coordinated.

    3. Close attention to the different resources that students use can allow physics teachers to gauge the learning occurring in their classrooms.

  • Holm, Satu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Slavic and Baltic Studies, Finnish, Dutch, and German, Slavic Languages.
    Ryska språkets roll i Finland: Undersökning av språkets synlighet i dagens finska samhälle2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna uppsats handlar om vilken status det ryska språket har i dagens finska samhälle och hur den har förändrats. Undersökningen består av en förklaring av situationen i historien och idag, analys av en intervju med den finsk-ryska skådespelaren Alina Tomnikov och en analys av finska medias bild av ryskspråkiga i Finland. Resultat av undersökningen är att det ryska språkets status i det finska samhället och finländares omdöme om ryssar och ryska språket har förbättrats. Mina frågeställningar är om ryska språkets möjligheter och kunskaper i Finland och vad det innebär att vara ryskspråkig i det finska samhället. I arbetet fokuserar jag på Finlands huvudstadsområde och dess ryskhet.

  • Helander, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Leviner, PernillaStockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law, Stockholm Centre for the Rights of the Child.
    Barn, migration och integration i en utmanande tid2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • Karis Stångberg, Frida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Att använda trädtänk för att förstå evolution: Textanalys av tre läroböcker i biologi 12017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Eklund, Sheri
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    Climate change education with a bright horizon?: Pedagogical reflections on teacher training for climate education that aims to empower students2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is already affecting communities around the world and the impacts will only get worse, according to scientists, unless we significantly reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  These realities can lead to climate anxiety, not least among youth.  How can teachers educate students about climate change in a constructive way?  This study examines pedagogical reflections from grade school and gymnasium teachers who participated in a professional development workshop entitled “Climate workshop with a bright horizon” organized by The House of Science, the Bolin Center for Climate Research, and Stockholm City.  To address students’ climate anxiety, research says that teaching methods characterized by pluralism, democratic participation, and authenticity can be empowering to students in helping them to engage, act, and cope with unpredictability.  This study identifies opportunities to strengthen these aspects in climate education by, for example, using socio-scientific issue dialogues. 

  • Andersson, Robert
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    ”Vilken energikälla ska vi välja?”: Elevers vägar till agentiska beslut i frågor om energi och hållbar utveckling2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The planetary impact from human activities calls attention to education for sustainable development. Previous research shows the need for new practice like socio-scientific issues (SSI) education and accordingly brings new challenges for science teachers. In collaboration with a teacher the present study is developing a didactic model, specifically enhancing students’ agency in the context of a SSI aimed at making students decide on future renewable energy. The data consisted of audio-recordings from group talk between Swedish social science students in grade 10. An analytical framework was designed based on Sadler’s four aspects of SSI (Sadler, Barab & Scott, 2007) and the concept of agency defined by Biesta andTedder (2007). The results show a high level of three aspects; complexity, multiple perspectives and SSI as an ongoing inquiry and also a low level of students’ scepticism towards biased information. The study presents new knowledge of agency in science education and opportunities for teachers to reflect on strategies for designing SSI in a democratic setting.

  • Juntunen, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Mathematics and Science Education.
    "Duktiga" elever i matematik: En studie om elever med särskild begåvning2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    På senare tid har det skrivits mycket om elever som har en särskild begåvning inom ett visst ämne och att de inte får den hjälp och stöttning som behövs i den svenska skolan. Lärare har ansvar att stötta även dessa elever, detta fastslår skollagen genom att ”utbildningen ska främja alla barns och elevers utveckling och lärande” (SFS 2010:800, kap 1, 4 §). Detta innebär att alla har rätt att utvecklas efter sin egen förmåga. Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka hur lärare arbetar med elever som har en särskild begåvning i matematik i årskurserna 4–6, hur lärare stöttar och utmanar dessa elever samt hur lärarnas engagemang kan motivera elever. Att vara särbegåvad innebär att man besitter en exceptionell begåvning inom ett eller flera ämnen. Den empiriska undersökningen består av semistrukturerade intervjuer med elever och lärare. Resultatet presenteras genom teman som kom fram genom meningskoncentrering (Kvale, 1997). Resultatet visar att lärare har svårt att skilja på särbegåvade och högpresterande elever, att dessa elever vill ha mer utmaningar men att lärarnas arbetstid ofta inte räcker till att möta alla elever på deras individuella nivå, även fast ambitionen finns.

  • Höglund, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Offer och trovärdighet: En studie om hur offer och trovärdighet konstrueras efter införandet av den nya sexualbrottslagen2018Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This study aims to describe and analyse how victims and credibility are constructed in the government bill and verdicts concerning the new sexual offence law in Sweden that became effective 1 July 2018. A qualitative content analyse has been used to answer the purpose of the study and the result has been analysed using Christies theory of the ideal victim. The results show that the construction of the victim is not consistent with Christies theory of the ideal victim. If the victim has acted with resistance is no longer considered significant. The perpetrator is described to have responsibility to assure that the victim participated with free will. However, victim reactions after the assault are described as important for the victims credibility. The victim is constructed as more credible if acting with sadness, crying and being jumpy. Results also show that it is important for the credibility that the victim leaves a consistent, truthful story and make a clear distinction of what is a clear memory and what is unsure. The main finding is that there has been a change in how the victim is constructed and what is needed for the victim to seem as credible.

  • Johansson, Jon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Min ringa kalminks väst: Spår av vardaglig klädkultur i brott mot överflödsförordningarna 1722-17682015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis