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Xiong, Y., Tvedt, J., Åkerstedt, T., Cadar, D. & Wang, H.-X. (2024). Impact of sleep duration and sleep disturbances on the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease: A 10-year follow-up study. Psychiatry Research, 333, Article ID 115760.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Impact of sleep duration and sleep disturbances on the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease: A 10-year follow-up study
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2024 (engelsk)Inngår i: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 333, artikkel-id 115760Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The nature of the relationship between sleep problems and dementia remains unclear. This study investigated the relationship between sleep measures and dementia in older adults (≥ 65) using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and further investigated the causal association in Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis. In total of 7,223 individuals, 5.7 % developed dementia (1.7 % Alzheimer's disease (AD)) within an average of 8 (± 2.9) years. Cox regression models and MR were employed. Long sleep duration (>8 h) was associated with 64 % increased risk of incident dementia and 2-fold high risk of AD compared to ideal sleep duration (7–8 h). This association was particularly evident in older-older adults (≥70 years) and those who consumed alcohol. Short sleep duration (<7 h) was associated with lower risk of incident dementia among older-older but higher risk among younger-older adults. Sleep disturbances and perceived sleep quality were not associated with dementia or AD. The MR study did not reveal causal associations between sleep duration and dementia. These findings suggest that self-reported short sleep in younger-older and long sleep in older-older adults and those with frequent alcohol consumption are associated with dementia. Early detection of these sleep patterns may help identify individuals at higher dementia risk.

Emneord
Sleep duration, Sleep disturbances, Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Mendelian randomization
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228137 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2024.115760 (DOI)001180166800001 ()38301285 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85183958998 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2024-04-10 Laget: 2024-04-10 Sist oppdatert: 2024-04-10bibliografisk kontrollert
Feng, M.-Y., Bi, Y.-H., Wang, H.-X. & Pei, J.-J. (2023). Influence of chronic diseases on the occurrence of depression: A 13-year follow-up study from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. Psychiatry Research, 326, Article ID 115268.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Influence of chronic diseases on the occurrence of depression: A 13-year follow-up study from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 326, artikkel-id 115268Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The causal association between chronic diseases and depression remains unclear. This study aimed to explore the effects of types and number of chronic diseases on the risk of depression using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). A self-admitted questionnaire was used to obtain data on 14 predefined chronic diseases and the European-Depression Scale (EURO-D) was used to assess depression. Among the 16,080 baseline depression-free participants aged 50+, 31.29% (5032) developed depression over 13 years. Multivariate Cox regression models showed that individuals with any chronic diseases were at higher risk of new onset depression compared to disease-free participants. The risk of new onset depression increased with an increasing number of diseases among both younger (50–64) and older (65+) adults. Individuals with heart attack, stroke, diabetes, chronic lung disease, and arthritis were at increased risk of depression across age groups. However, some age-specific associations were observed, with cancer increasing depression risk among younger- and peptic ulcer, Parkinson's disease and cataracts increasing depression risk among older adults. These findings highlight the importance of managing chronic diseases, especially among those with more than two diseases, to prevent the development of depression among middle-aged and older adults.

Emneord
Chronic disease, Cohort study, Cox regression model, Depression, Middle-aged and older adults
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-229756 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2023.115268 (DOI)001015450000001 ()37270866 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85163364688 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2024-06-05 Laget: 2024-06-05 Sist oppdatert: 2024-06-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Tan, X., Åkerstedt, T., Lagerros, Y. T., Åkerstedt, A. M., Bellocco, R., Adami, H.-O., . . . Wang, H.-X. (2023). Interactive association between insomnia symptoms and sleep duration for the risk of dementia: a prospective study in the Swedish National March Cohort. Age and Ageing, 52(9), Article ID afad163.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Interactive association between insomnia symptoms and sleep duration for the risk of dementia: a prospective study in the Swedish National March Cohort
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2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 52, nr 9, artikkel-id afad163Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Given the importance of sleep in maintaining neurocognitive health, both sleep duration and quality might be component causes of dementia. However, the possible role of insomnia symptoms as risk factors for dementia remain uncertain. Methods: We prospectively studied 22,078 participants in the Swedish National March Cohort who were free from dementia and stroke at baseline. Occurrence of dementia was documented by national registers during a median follow-up period of 19.2 years. Insomnia symptoms and sleep duration were ascertained by Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Compared to participants without insomnia at baseline, those who reported any insomnia symptom experienced a greater incidence of dementia during follow-up (HR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.35). Difficulty initiating sleep versus non insomnia (HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.52), but not difficulty maintaining sleep or early morning awakening was associated with an increased risk of dementia. Short sleep duration was associated with increased risk of dementia (6 h vs. 8 h, HR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.11-1.51; 5 h vs. 8 h, HR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.00-1.57). Stratified analyses suggested that insomnia symptoms increased the risk of dementia only amongst participants with =7 h sleep (vs. non-insomnia HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.00-1.54, P=0.05), but not amongst short sleepers (<7 h). Short sleep duration also did not further inflate the risk of dementia amongst insomniacs. Conclusion: Insomnia and short sleep duration increase the risk of dementia amongst middle-aged to older adults.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Oxford University Press, 2023
Emneord
insomnia, sleep duration, dementia, national cohort, longitudinal study, older people
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-222235 (URN)10.1093/ageing/afad163 (DOI)001063482100001 ()37676841 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173064876 (Scopus ID)
Merknad

This research was supported by ZJU 100 Young Professor Project (X.T.), Åke Wiberg Foundation (X.T., M19–0266), Fredrik and Ingrid Thuring Foundation (X.T., 2019–00488) and Region Stockholm Clinical Research Appointment (Y.T.L.), the Swedish Research Council (HX.W., 2018–02998), and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working life, and Welfare (HX.W., 2019–01120, 2020–00313).

Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-10-11 Laget: 2023-10-11 Sist oppdatert: 2024-01-30bibliografisk kontrollert
Stengård, J., Leineweber, C. & Wang, H.-X. (2023). Prolonging working life among blue-collar workers: The buffering effect of psychosocial job resources on the association between physically demanding and hazardous work and retirement timing. SSM - Population Health, 22, Article ID 101372.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Prolonging working life among blue-collar workers: The buffering effect of psychosocial job resources on the association between physically demanding and hazardous work and retirement timing
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 22, artikkel-id 101372Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The need to delay retirement timing has been acknowledged in Western countries due to demographic ageing. The aim of the present study was to examine the buffering effects of job resources (decision authority, social support, work-time control, and rewards) on the association of exposures to physically demanding work tasks and physically hazardous work environment with non-disability retirement timing. Results from discrete-time event history analyses, in a sample of blue-collar workers (n = 1741; 2792 observations) from the nationwide longitudinal Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), supported that decision authority and social support may buffer the negative impact of heavy physical demands on working longer (continuing working vs retiring). Stratified analyses by gender showed that the buffering effect of decision authority remained statistically significant for men, while that of social support remained statistically significant for women. Moreover, an age effect was displayed, such that a buffering effect of social support on the association of heavy physical demands and high physical hazards with working longer were found among older men (≥64 years), but not younger (59–63 years). The findings suggest that heavy physical demands should be reduced, however, when not feasible physical demands should be accompanied by social support at work for delaying retirement.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2023
Emneord
retirement timing, physically demanding work tasks, physically hazardous work environment, job resources, moderator, interaction
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225010 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2023.101372 (DOI)2-s2.0-85149214471 (Scopus ID)
Merknad

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) under Grant 2019–01120. Data collection was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) through the Stockholm Stress Center under Grant 2009–1758; the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare under Grant 2005–0734; and the Swedish Research Council (VR) under Grant 2009-06192, 2013–01645, 2015–06013, and 2017–00624.

Tilgjengelig fra: 2024-01-04 Laget: 2024-01-04 Sist oppdatert: 2024-01-30bibliografisk kontrollert
Tan, X., Lebedeva, A., Åkerstedt, T. & Wang, H.-X. (2023). Sleep Mediates the Association Between Stress at Work and Incident Dementia: Study From the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 78(3), 447-453
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Sleep Mediates the Association Between Stress at Work and Incident Dementia: Study From the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 78, nr 3, s. 447-453Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Both psychosocial stress at work and sleep disturbance may predispose impaired cognitive function and dementia in later life. However, whether sleep plays a mediating role for the link between stress at work and subsequent dementia has yet to be investigated.

Methods: Data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe were used for the study. A cohort of 7 799 dementia-free individuals (aged 71.1 ± 0.2 years) were followed up for a median of 4.1 years for incident dementia. Job demand and control were estimated using questions derived from the Karasek’s Job Content Questionnaire. Sleep disturbance was ascertained by a question in the EURO-Depression scale. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, education, cognitive test score, and other potential covariates were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of dementia in relation to different job strain levels.

Results: An interaction between job demand and sleep disturbance regarding the risk of dementia was detected. Data suggested a protective role of high-level job demand for dementia in individuals with sleep disturbance (HR [95% CI]: 0.69 [0.47, 1.00]) compared with low job demand. A 4-category job strain model based on the combination of job demand and job control levels suggested that among individuals with sleep disturbance, passive job (low demand, low control) was associated with a higher risk of dementia (1.54 [1.01, 2.34]), compared to active job (high demand, high control).

Conclusion: The link between work-related stress and risk of dementia is limited to individuals suffering sleep disturbance.

Emneord
dementia, psychosocial stress, sleep
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207225 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glac104 (DOI)000804829600001 ()35512268 (PubMedID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-07-11 Laget: 2022-07-11 Sist oppdatert: 2024-01-30bibliografisk kontrollert
Marseglia, A., Kalpouzos, G., Laukka, E. J., Maddock, J., Patalay, P., Wang, H.-X., . . . Dekhtyar, S. (2023). Social Health and Cognitive Change in Old Age: Role of Brain Reserve. Annals of Neurology, 93(4), 844-855
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Social Health and Cognitive Change in Old Age: Role of Brain Reserve
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2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 93, nr 4, s. 844-855Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Individual aspects of social health (SH; eg, network, engagement, support) have been linked to cognitive health. However, their combined effect and the role of the structural properties of the brain (brain reserve [BR]) remain unclear. We investigated the interplay of SH and BR on cognitive change in older adults.

Methods: Within the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care–Kungsholmen, 368 dementia-free adults aged ≥60 years with baseline brain magnetic resonance imaging were followed over 12 years to assess cognitive change. A measure of global cognition was computed at each of the 5 waves of assessment by averaging domain-specific Z scores for episodic memory, perceptual speed, semantic memory, and letter and category fluency. An SH composite score was computed at baseline by combining leisure activities and social network. BR was proxied by total brain tissue volume (TBTV). Linear mixed models (adjusted for sociodemographic, vascular, and genetic factors) were used to estimate cognitive trajectories in relation to SH and TBTV. Interaction analysis and stratification were used to examine the interplay between SH and TBTV.

Results: Moderate–good SH (n = 245; vs poor, β-slope = 0.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.002–0.02, p = 0.018) and moderate-to-large TBTV (n = 245; vs small, β-slope = 0.03, 95% CI = 0.02–0.04, p < 0.001) were separately associated with slower cognitive decline. In stratified analysis, moderate–good SH was associated with higher cognitive levels (but not change) only in participants with moderate-to-large TBTV (β-intercept = 0.21, 95% CI = 0.06–0.37, p < 0.01; interaction SH * TBTV, p < 0.05).

Interpretation: Our findings highlight the interplay between SH and BR that likely unfolds throughout the entire life course to shape old-age cognitive outcomes. ANN NEUROL 2023

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Emneord
social health, cognitive change, old age, brain reserve
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215286 (URN)10.1002/ana.26591 (DOI)000917173300001 ()36579809 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147039620 (Scopus ID)
Merknad

SNAC-K (http://www.snac.org) is financially supported by the Swedish Ministry of Health and Social Affairs; participating county councils and municipalities; the Swedish Research Council; and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare. This project is part of the SHARED Consortium (https://www.shared-dementia.eu/), an EU Joint Program–Neurodegenerative Disease Research (JPND; www.jpnd.eu) project (grant no. 733051082). A.M. and A.-K.W. lead the Swedish stream of the SHARED Consortium and are funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (FORTE grant no. 2018-01888). J.M. and P.P. are part of the UK-led stream of the JPND consortium and are funded by the Alzheimer's Society (grant no. 469) in the UK. S.D. acknowledges support from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life, and Welfare (FORTE grant no. 2019-01076).

Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-03-23 Laget: 2023-03-23 Sist oppdatert: 2024-01-12bibliografisk kontrollert
Stengård, J., Leineweber, C., Virtanen, M., Westerlund, H. & Wang, H.-X. (2022). Do good psychosocial working conditions prolong working lives? Findings from a prospective study in Sweden. European Journal of Ageing, 19, 677-688
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Do good psychosocial working conditions prolong working lives? Findings from a prospective study in Sweden
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2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: European Journal of Ageing, ISSN 1613-9372, E-ISSN 1613-9380, Vol. 19, s. 677-688Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Due to an ageing population, governments in European countries are striving to keep older workers longer in the workforce. Remarkably few studies have paid attention to the influence of psychosocial working conditions on timing of retirement for older workers in and beyond normative retirement age. The aim of the present study was to examine whether good psychosocial working conditions contribute to prolonged working lives among older workers (59 years and above). A particular question was whether such conditions increase in importance with age. Seven waves (2006-2018) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) were used (N = 6000, observations = 10,632). Discrete-time event history analyses showed that higher levels of job resources (decision authority [OR 1.13, 95% CI 1.06-1.22], skill use [OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.07-1.29], learning opportunities [OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.13-1.31], social support [OR 1.29 (95% CI 1.16-1.42], work-time control [OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.13], and reward [OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.24-1.57])-but not lower levels of job demands (quantitative and emotional demands or effort)-were associated with working longer (continued work two years later). Also, low effort-reward imbalance (OR 0.84 [95% CI 0.73-0.96]) was associated with working longer. In addition, skill use, work-time control, reward, and low effort-reward imbalance increased in importance with age for continued work. These results suggest that providing older workers with control over their work tasks, giving opportunities for learning and using their skills, as well as rewarding and acknowledging their achievements, may keep them in the workforce longer. Especially, job resources may grow in importance with age.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Springer Nature, 2022
Emneord
retirement timing, psychosocial working conditions, job resources, prolong working life
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200523 (URN)10.1007/s10433-021-00672-0 (DOI)000731388200001 ()2-s2.0-85121374880 (Scopus ID)
Merknad

Open access funding provided by Stockholm University. This work was supported by Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) [Grant Number 2019-01120]. Data collection was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) through the Stockholm Stress Center (Grant 2009-1758), the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (Grant 2005-0734), and the Swedish Research Council (VR; Grant 2009-06192, 2013-01645, 2015-06013, and 2017-00624).

Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-01-11 Laget: 2022-01-11 Sist oppdatert: 2022-09-16bibliografisk kontrollert
Stengård, J., Virtanen, M., Leineweber, C., Westerlund, H. & Wang, H.-X. (2022). The Implication of Physically Demanding and Hazardous Work on Retirement Timing. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(13), Article ID 8123.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The Implication of Physically Demanding and Hazardous Work on Retirement Timing
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2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, nr 13, artikkel-id 8123Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The need to retain individuals longer in the workforce is acknowledged in many high-income countries. The present study therefore aimed to examine the importance of physically demanding work tasks (PDWT) and physically hazardous work environment (PHWE) in relation to retirement timing among pensionable workers (≥61 years). A particular question was whether PDWT and PHWE increased in importance with age. Six waves (2008–2018) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) were used (n = 5201; 56% women and 44% men; mean age at first survey was 61.0 (SD 2.0) years). Discrete time-event history analysis, stratified by socioeconomic position and gender, showed that among blue-collar workers, PDWT and PHWE were associated with an increased likelihood of retiring within the next two years. With increasing age, high-level PHWE was associated with higher probability of retiring among blue-collar men, whereas heavy PDWT was associated with lower probability of retiring among blue-collar women. Among white-collar workers, having at least some PDWT compared to no PDWT was associated with a lower likelihood of retiring within the next two years. With increasing age, exposure to PHWE was associated with higher probability of retiring among white-collar women. These results suggest that to delay retirements, organizations could offer their older employees, especially blue-collar workers and the oldest white-collar women, alternatives to PDWT and PHWE.

Emneord
physical job demands, physically demanding work tasks, physically hazardous work environment, retirement timing, actual retirement, age interactions
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207649 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19138123 (DOI)000825610500001 ()2-s2.0-85133136946 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2019-01120Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-1758Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2005-0734Swedish Research Council, 2009-06192Swedish Research Council, 2013-01645Swedish Research Council, 2015-06013Swedish Research Council, 2017-00624
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-08-02 Laget: 2022-08-02 Sist oppdatert: 2022-08-19bibliografisk kontrollert
Lenart-Bugla, M., Łuc, M., Pawłowski, M., Szcześniak, D., Seifert, I., Wiegelmann, H., . . . Rymaszewska, J. (2022). What Do We Know about Social and Non-Social Factors Influencing the Pathway from Cognitive Health to Dementia? A Systematic Review of Reviews. Brain Sciences, 12(9), Article ID 1214.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>What Do We Know about Social and Non-Social Factors Influencing the Pathway from Cognitive Health to Dementia? A Systematic Review of Reviews
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2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 12, nr 9, artikkel-id 1214Artikkel, forskningsoversikt (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The heterogeneous and multi-factorial nature of dementia requires the consideration of all health aspects when predicting the risk of its development and planning strategies for its prevention. This systematic review of reviews provides a comprehensive synthesis of those factors associated with cognition in the context of dementia, identifying the role of social aspects and evidencing knowledge gaps in this area of research. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses from 2009–2021 were searched for within Medline, PsycINFO, CINAHL Complete, Cochrane, and Epistemonikos. Reviewers independently screened, reviewed, and assessed the records, following the PRISMA-2020 guidelines. From 314 included studies, 624 cognitive-related factors were identified, most of them risk factors (61.2%), mainly belonging to the group of ‘somatic comorbidities’ (cardiovascular disease and diabetes) and ‘genetic predispositions’. The protective factors (20%) were mainly related to lifestyle, pointing to the Mediterranean diet, regular physical activity, and cognitively stimulating activities. Social factors constituted 9.6% of all identified factors. Research on biological and medical factors dominates the reviewed literature. Greater social support and frequent contact may confer some protection against cognitive decline and dementia by delaying its onset or reducing the overall risk; however, overall, our findings are inconsistent. Further research is needed in the fields of lifestyle, psychology, social health, and the protective factors against cognitive decline and dementia.

Emneord
dementia, cognitive function, risk factors, protective factors, social factors, cognitive decline
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-210282 (URN)10.3390/brainsci12091214 (DOI)000856296400001 ()36138950 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85138766251 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-10-11 Laget: 2022-10-11 Sist oppdatert: 2022-10-11bibliografisk kontrollert
Feng, M.-Y., Wang, H.-X., Zhuo, L.-B., Yao, W., Hao, C.-F. & Pei, J.-J. (2022). Work-Related Stress and Occurrence of Cardiovascular Disease A 13-Year Prospective Study. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 64(11), 927-933
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Work-Related Stress and Occurrence of Cardiovascular Disease A 13-Year Prospective Study
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2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 64, nr 11, s. 927-933Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of the study is to investigate the influence of work-related psychological and physical stresses on risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Methods : A total of 5651 CVD-free participants older than 50 years from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe were followed up for 13 years to detect incident CVD. Work-related stress was assessed using job strain and job reward questionnaire. Cox regression model was used to estimate the association. Results: High physical demands (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30) and low reward (HR, 1.19) compared with their counterparts, as well as active physical jobs (HR, 1.41) and high physical strain (HR, 1.45) in comparison with low physical strain were associated with higher risk of incident CVD after adjusting for confounders. However, combining physically stressful jobs with low reward did not further increase the CVD risk. Conclusions: Avoiding physically stressful jobs or providing appropriate reward may reduce the occurrence of CVD.

Emneord
work-related stress, cardiovascular disease, job strain, job reward, the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-211559 (URN)10.1097/JOM.0000000000002645 (DOI)000878768700029 ()35902362 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141889996 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-11-25 Laget: 2022-11-25 Sist oppdatert: 2022-11-25bibliografisk kontrollert
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5051-4929