Endre søk
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publikasjoner (10 av 28) Visa alla publikasjoner
Carlsson, E., Hemmingsson, T., Landberg, J., Burström, B. & Thern, E. (2023). Do early life factors explain the educational differences in early labour market exit? A register-based cohort study. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1680.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Do early life factors explain the educational differences in early labour market exit? A register-based cohort study
Vise andre…
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, nr 1, artikkel-id 1680Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Socioeconomic inequalities in labour market participation are well established. However, we do not fully know what causes these inequalities. The present study aims to examine to what extent factors in childhood and late adolescence can explain educational differences in early labour market exit among older workers.

Methods: All men born in 1951–1953 who underwent conscription examination for the Swedish military in 1969–1973 (n = 145 551) were followed from 50 to 64 years of age regarding early labour market exit (disability pension, long-term sickness absence, long-term unemployment and early old-age retirement with and without income). Early life factors, such as cognitive ability, stress resilience, and parental socioeconomic position, were included. Cox proportional-hazards regressions were used to estimate the association between the level of education and each early labour market exit pathway, including adjustment for early life factors.

Results: The lowest educated men had a higher risk of exit through disability pension (HR: 2.72), long-term sickness absence (HR: 2.29), long-term unemployment (HR: 1.45), and early old-age retirement with (HR: 1.29) and without income (HR: 1.55) compared to the highest educated men. Factors from early life explained a large part of the educational differences in disability pension, long-term sickness absence and long-term unemployment but not for early old-age retirement. Important explanatory factors were cognitive ability and stress resilience, whilst cardiorespiratory fitness had negligible impact.

Conclusions: The association between education and early exit due to disability pension, long-term sickness absence and long-term unemployment was to a large part explained by factors from early life. However, this was not seen for early old-age retirement. These results indicate the importance of taking a life-course perspective when examining labour market participation in later working life.

Emneord
Socioeconomic inequalities, Early retirement, Disability pension, Sickness absence, Unemployment, Older workers
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
epidemiologi; folkhälsovetenskap
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225601 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16626-3 (DOI)001151590100001 ()37653490 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169680279 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2018-01917Swedish Research Council, 2018-01917Swedish Research Council, 2018-01917Stockholm University
Tilgjengelig fra: 2024-01-18 Laget: 2024-01-18 Sist oppdatert: 2024-02-27bibliografisk kontrollert
Landberg, J. & Thern, E. (2023). Is the association between alcohol use and sickness absence modified by socioeconomic position? findings from the Stockholm public health cohort. BMC Public Health, 23(1), Article ID 1490.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Is the association between alcohol use and sickness absence modified by socioeconomic position? findings from the Stockholm public health cohort
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, nr 1, artikkel-id 1490Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundThe distribution of sickness absence tends to be socially patterned less is however known about the underlying mechanisms and pathways of the social gradient found in sickness absence. The present study aims to investigate (i) if the risk function between average volume of alcohol consumption and sickness absence is modified by socio-economic position (SEP), and (ii) whether such an effect modification can be attributed to differences in drinking patterns and other risk factors including other lifestyle behaviours, health status, and working conditions.MethodsThe study was based on data from the Stockholm public health cohort 2006, with an analytical sample of 13 855 respondents aged 18-64 years. Self-reported information on occupational class (a measure of SEP), alcohol consumption, other lifestyle behaviour, health and working conditions was collected from the survey. The outcome of long-term (> 14 days) sickness absence between 2006 and 2008 was obtained from national registers. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate the Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).ResultsIn the initial analyses, heavy drinking manual workers had a 5-fold increased risk of long-term sickness absence compared to non-manual employees who were moderate drinkers, and approximately 60% of the excess risk among heavy drinking manual workers was attributable to an interaction between alcohol use and SEP. Adjusting for working conditions was associated with the largest attenuation of the risk estimate, compared to other lifestyle behaviors and health. In the fully adjusted model, the IRR was further attenuated for the manual workers and the joint effect of SEP and heavy drinking remained in the final model with an attributable proportion of 49%.ConclusionsIndividuals in Sweden with lower levels of SEP appear to be more vulnerable to alcohol consumption in relation to sickness absence, where differences in working conditions explained a large part but not all of the differential vulnerability.

Emneord
Health inequalities, Alcohol, Sickness absence, Lifestyle factors, Working conditions
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221310 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16341-z (DOI)001042525300006 ()37542206 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166599019 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-09-19 Laget: 2023-09-19 Sist oppdatert: 2023-09-19bibliografisk kontrollert
Norström, T. & Landberg, J. (2023). The association between population drinking and ischemic heart disease mortality in educational groups. Alcohol and Alcoholism, Article ID agad033.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The association between population drinking and ischemic heart disease mortality in educational groups
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, artikkel-id agad033Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

A large number of observational studies have found a J-shaped relationship between alcohol intake and ischemic heart disease (IHD) risk. However, some studies suggest that the alleged cardio-protective effect may be an artifact in the way that the elevated risk for abstainers is due to self-selection on risk factors for IHD. The aim of this paper is to estimate the association between alcohol and IHD-mortality on the basis of aggregate time-series data, where the problem with selection effects is not present. In addition, we will analyze SES-specific mortality to investigate whether there is any socio-economic gradient in the relationship at issue. SES was measured by educational level. We used IHD-mortality in three educational groups as outcome. Per capita alcohol consumption was proxied by Systembolaget’s alcohol sales (litres of alcohol 100% per capita 15+). Swedish quarterly data on mortality and alcohol consumption spanned the period 1991Q1–2020Q4. We applied SARIMA time-series analysis. Survey data were used to construct an indicator of heavy SES-specific episodic drinking. The estimated association between per capita consumption and IHD-mortality was positive and statistically significant in the two groups with primary and secondary education, but not in the group with postsecondary education. The association was significantly stronger the lower the educational group. Although the associations were generally stronger for males than for females, these differences were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Our findings suggest that the detrimental impact of per capita consumption on IHD-mortality was stronger the lower the educational group.

Emneord
alcohol, heart disease mortality, time-series, Sweden, education
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-217325 (URN)10.1093/alcalc/agad033 (DOI)000990840400001 ()
Forskningsfinansiär
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-01769
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-05-18 Laget: 2023-05-23 Sist oppdatert: 2023-06-20bibliografisk kontrollert
Berg, L., Landberg, J. & Thern, E. (2023). Using repeated measures to study the contribution of alcohol consumption and smoking to the social gradient in all‐cause mortality: Results from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort. Drug and Alcohol Review, 42(7), 1850-1859
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Using repeated measures to study the contribution of alcohol consumption and smoking to the social gradient in all‐cause mortality: Results from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort
2023 (engelsk)Inngår i: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 42, nr 7, s. 1850-1859Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The social gradient in consumption behaviours has been suggestedto partly explain health inequalities. The majority of previous studies have onlyincluded baseline measurements and not considered potential changes in behav-iours over time. The study aimed to investigate the contribution of alcohol con-sumption and smoking to the social gradient in mortality and to assess whetherthe use of repeated measurements results in larger attenuations of the main asso-ciation compared to using single baseline assessments.

Methods: Longitudinal survey data from the population-based Stockholm PublicHealth Cohort from 2006 to 2014 was linked to register data on mortality until2018 for 13,688 individuals and analysed through Cox regression.

Results: Low socioeconomic position (SEP) was associated with increased mortal-ity compared with high SEP; hazard ratios 1.56 (95% CI 1.30–1.88) for occupa-tional status and 1.77 (95% CI 1.49–2.11) for education, after adjustment fordemographic characteristics. Using repeated measurements, alcohol consumptionand smoking explained 44% of the association between occupational status andall-cause mortality. Comparing repeated and baseline measures, the percentageattenuation due to alcohol consumption increased from 11% to 18%, whereas itremained similar for smoking (25–23%).

Discussion and Conclusions: Smoking and alcohol consumption explained alarge part of the association between SEP and mortality. Comparing results fromtime-fixed and time-varying models, there was an increase in overall percentageattenuation that was mainly due to the increased proportion explained by alcoholconsumption. Repeated measurements provide a better estimation of the contri-bution of alcohol consumption, but not smoking, for the association between SEPand mortality.

Emneord
alcohol drinking, mortality, repeated measurements, smoking, socioeconomic position
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223062 (URN)10.1111/dar.13759 (DOI)001085504900001 ()37830637 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174073012 (Scopus ID)
Forskningsfinansiär
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017‐01769
Tilgjengelig fra: 2023-10-17 Laget: 2023-10-17 Sist oppdatert: 2024-01-16bibliografisk kontrollert
Sundin, E., Landberg, J., Galanti, M. R., Room, R. & Ramstedt, M. (2022). Country-Level Heavy Episodic Drinking and Individual-Level Experiences of Harm from Others' Drinking-Related Aggression in 19 European Countries. European Addiction Research, 28(2), 134-142
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Country-Level Heavy Episodic Drinking and Individual-Level Experiences of Harm from Others' Drinking-Related Aggression in 19 European Countries
Vise andre…
2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: European Addiction Research, ISSN 1022-6877, E-ISSN 1421-9891, Vol. 28, nr 2, s. 134-142Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: There is limited knowledge about how individual experiences of harm from others’ drinking are influenced by heavy episodic drinking (HED) at the country level. The present study aimed to assess (1) the association between the country-level prevalence of HED and the risk of experiencing harm from others’ drinking-related aggression and (2) if HED at the country level modifies the association between consumption of alcohol per capita (APC) and such harm. Methods: Outcome data from 32,576 participants from 19 European countries stem from the RARHA SEAS study. Self-reported harm from others’ drinking included having been verbally abused, harmed physically, or having serious arguments. Data on country-level drinking patterns were derived from the World Health Organization. Associations between country-level prevalence of monthly HED and experiences of aggression (at least 1 of 3 studied harms) were derived through multilevel models – adjusted for country-level age structure and by including the respondent’s own HED patterns as a mediator. Results: A 1% increase in the prevalence of monthly HED was associated with 5% higher odds (odds ratio [OR] 1.05) of experiencing others’ alcohol-related aggression among men, and 6% (OR 1.06) among women. The results suggest that the association between APC and harm was stronger in countries with high prevalences of HED, but the modifying effect could not be confirmed. Discussion/Conclusion: Harm from others’ drinking-related aggression depends not only on individual factors but is also influenced by the drinking patterns of the population. However, the country-level prevalence of HED only explains a small part of the variance of this type of harm.

Emneord
Alcohol, Harm to others, Aggression, Heavy episodic drinking, Cross-country
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200680 (URN)10.1159/000520079 (DOI)000726211000001 ()34844238 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85120648351 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-01-14 Laget: 2022-01-14 Sist oppdatert: 2022-04-08bibliografisk kontrollert
Norström, T., Landberg, J. & Trolldal, B. (2022). Drinking and acquisition of unrecorded alcohol across educational groups in Sweden. Drug and Alcohol Review, 41(1), 160-170
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Drinking and acquisition of unrecorded alcohol across educational groups in Sweden
2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 41, nr 1, s. 160-170Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: It is estimated that 18.5% of total alcohol consumption in Sweden in 2018 was unrecorded. However, little is known about the socio-economic profile of consumers of unrecorded alcohol. The aim of this study was to elucidate this issue by analysing data from a unique Swedish national repeated cross-sectional alcohol use survey.

Methods: Individual-level information on alcohol consumption and socio-economic status (SES) for the years 2013–2018 was retrieved from the Monitoring Project; a nationally representative monthly alcohol use survey. The analytical sample comprised 64 375 respondents aged 25–74 years. SES was measured by educational level. We used three educational groups: (i) low (<10 years); (ii) intermediate (10–12 years); and (iii) high (13+ years). We included indicators of the following sources of unrecorded alcohol consumption: travellers' import, smuggled alcohol, home production, internet and illicit home-distilling. We estimated adjusted SES-specific means of the various forms of unrecorded consumption. The means were adjusted for the effects of age, sex and region.

Results: There were no significant educational differences in the total of unrecorded alcohol consumption; the same holds true for home-production and internet. However, with respect to smuggled and home-distilling, a statistically significant educational gradient was observed with the lowest educational group scoring approximately four times higher than the highest.

Discussion and Conclusions: Our findings suggest that there are no differences across educational groups in the consumption of unrecorded alcohol as a whole. However, consumption of smuggled alcohol and illicitly distilled spirits is elevated in the low educational group.

Emneord
unrecorded alcohol, Sweden, education, socio-economic status
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-193676 (URN)10.1111/dar.13304 (DOI)
Forskningsfinansiär
Swedish Research Council, 2017-01769Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-01769
Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-06-04 Laget: 2021-06-04 Sist oppdatert: 2022-02-25bibliografisk kontrollert
Thern, E., Falkstedt, D., Almroth, M., Kjellberg, K., Landberg, J., Bodin, T., . . . Hemmingsson, T. (2022). Educational qualification differences and early labor market exit among men: the contribution of labor market marginalization measured across the working life. BMC Public Health, 22(1), Article ID 1015.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Educational qualification differences and early labor market exit among men: the contribution of labor market marginalization measured across the working life
Vise andre…
2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, nr 1, artikkel-id 1015Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The present study aims to investigate the association between educational qualification and early labor market exit among men and to examine the contribution of labor market marginalization measured across the working life on this association.

Method: A register-linked cohort study was conducted including men who completed military service in 1969/70 (born between 1949 and 1951) and were alive at age 55 and not disability pension beneficiaries (n = 40 761). Information on the highest level of educational qualification and the outcome of early exit (disability pension, sickness absence, unemployment, and early old-age pension) was obtained from Swedish nationwide registers between the ages of 55 and 64 years. Labor market marginalization was defined as periods of long-term unemployment and sickness absence over the working life and up to follow-up. Cox regression analyses were used to obtain hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Results: Low-educated men were more likely to leave the labor force early due to disability pension or sickness absence (HR: 2.48), unemployment (HR: 2.09), and early old-age pension with- (HR:1.25) and without -income (HR: 1.58). Labor market marginalization across the working life explained a large part of the association for the more involuntary early exit routes (disability pensions, sickness absence, unemployment) and explained very little with regards to the more voluntary early exit routes (early old-age pension with and without income).

Conclusion: Exposure to labor market marginalization across the working life was important in explaining educational differences in early labor market exit due to disability pension or sickness absence and unemployment. This study underscores the importance of identifying and implementing preventive measures in the workplace (e.g. adaptions) to prevent new spells of sickness absence and unemployment, especially among low educated individuals.

Emneord
Early exit, Voluntary exit, Involuntary exit, Educational inequalities, Labor market marginalization
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-205183 (URN)10.1186/s12889-022-13397-1 (DOI)000797975300002 ()35590290 (PubMedID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-05-31 Laget: 2022-05-31 Sist oppdatert: 2023-08-28bibliografisk kontrollert
Thor, S., Hemmingsson, T., Danielsson, A.-K. & Landberg, J. (2022). Fathers' alcohol consumption and risk of substance-related disorders in offspring. Drug And Alcohol Dependence, 233, Article ID 109354.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Fathers' alcohol consumption and risk of substance-related disorders in offspring
2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: Drug And Alcohol Dependence, ISSN 0376-8716, E-ISSN 1879-0046, Vol. 233, artikkel-id 109354Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Few studies have assessed how children are affected by parental alcohol consumption without clinically diagnosed alcohol problems, especially in relation to more long-term and severe consequences. The aim is to investigate how fathers’ alcohol use is related to the risk for substance-related disorders in offspring.

Method: A prospective cohort study of 64 710 Swedish citizens whose fathers were conscripted for compulsory military training at ages 18–20 in 1969/70. Information on fathers’ alcohol consumption, frequency of intoxication and apprehended for drunkenness, was collected during conscription. Offspring was followed for substance-related disorders from age 12 to end of follow up in 2009.

Results: All measures of fathers’ alcohol use were significantly and positively associated with risk for substance-related disorders in offspring. The associations were to a large extent explained by other risk factors in childhood. In the fully adjusted model, those with fathers in the highest alcohol consumption quintile still had a 63% higher risk (HR=1.63 CI 1.26–2.12) of substance-related disorders compared to those whose fathers’ reported abstinence. The highest risk was found among offspring to fathers with alcohol-related disorders or that had been apprehended for drunkenness, with a more than two-fold increased risk for substance-related disorders.

Conclusions: Despite the lower risk found among offspring to fathers with sub-clinical drinking when compared to those with alcohol-related disorders, the former group accounts for a much larger proportion of all cases of substance-related disorders in the population, prompting universal prevention efforts targeting the level of total alcohol consumption in society.

Emneord
Harm to others, Alcohol-related harm, Parental alcohol use, Offspring negative outcome
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207617 (URN)10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2022.109354 (DOI)000820115200017 ()35193083 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124739081 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-08-02 Laget: 2022-08-02 Sist oppdatert: 2022-09-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Raninen, J., Livingston, M., Landberg, J. & Ramstedt, M. (2022). To drink or not to drink: A study of the association between rates of non-drinkers and per drinker mean alcohol consumption in the Swedish general population. Drug and Alcohol Review, 41(6), 1475-1483
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>To drink or not to drink: A study of the association between rates of non-drinkers and per drinker mean alcohol consumption in the Swedish general population
2022 (engelsk)Inngår i: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 41, nr 6, s. 1475-1483Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Understanding how the mean consumption per drinker and rates of non-drinking interplay to form overall per capita alcohol consumption is imperative for our understanding of population drinking. The aim of the present study is to examine the association between rates of non-drinkers and per drinker mean alcohol consumption in the Swedish adult population and for different percentiles of drinkers.

Methods: Data came from a monthly telephone survey of drinking habits in the Swedish adult population between 2002 and 2013. Alcohol consumption and non-drinking during the last 30 days were measured by beverage-specific quantity-frequency questions. Regression models estimated the association between the rate of non-drinkers and per drinker volume on annual data. Auto-regressive integrated moving average time-series models estimated the association on monthly data.

Results: A significant (P < 0.01) negative association (−0.849) was found between the rate of non-drinkers and per drinker mean volume on annual data. A unit increase in non-drinking was associated with a decline of 0.85 cl of pure alcohol among drinkers. This finding was mirrored across all percentiles of consumption. The semi-log models found that a 1% unit increase in the rate of non-drinkers was followed by a 2% reduction in per drinker mean consumption. Auto-regressive integrated moving average time-series models verified these results.

Discussion and Conclusions: There is a significant association between the proportion of non-drinkers and the amount of drinking among drinkers. The theory of collectivity of drinking cultures should also include the non-drinking part of the population. 

Emneord
alcohol, collectivity, drinker, non-drinker, survey
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-206305 (URN)10.1111/dar.13501 (DOI)000807255600001 ()35673799 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85131317171 (Scopus ID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-06-27 Laget: 2022-06-27 Sist oppdatert: 2022-09-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Trolldal, B., Landberg, J. & Ramstedt, M. (2021). Changes in the Price of Alcohol and Effect on Youth Drinking and in Different Socio-Economic Groups. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 56(4), 475-481
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Changes in the Price of Alcohol and Effect on Youth Drinking and in Different Socio-Economic Groups
2021 (engelsk)Inngår i: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 56, nr 4, s. 475-481Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Many studies have shown that changes in alcohol prices have a significant effect on total sales. However, few studies have focused on youth, particularly in different socioeconomic groups. This study examined the effect of changes in the price of alcohol on consumption levels and binge drinking among 15 to 16 year old students in Sweden, both overall, among boys and girls, as well as within different socioeconomic groups.

Methods: Data on consumption were retrieved from a representative survey of students aged 15-16, conducted annually between 1989 and 2017. Time series analysis employed an autoregressive integrated moving average model (ARIMA). Two types of price data were used: the official price at the retail stores, and the mean price of the ten cheapest beverages in each category. The mean aggregate annual income per Swedish household was included as a control variable.

The variable used to measure the socioeconomic status was the proportion of the ninth-grade students at each school, who had at least one parent with an education higher than upper secondary school.

Results: The students' alcohol consumption levels and binge drinking were not significantly affected by price changes during the study period; this was true both for the group as a whole, and among subgroups of boys or girls or of different socioeconomic status. Results were similar regardless of which type of price data variable was used in the analyses.

Conclusion: Neither average nor minimum price of alcohol had a significant impact on the development of youth drinking in Sweden during the study period.

Emneord
ethanol, adolescent, alcohol drinking, beverages, income, socioeconomic factors, binge drinking
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-196498 (URN)10.1093/alcalc/agaa114 (DOI)000672760500013 ()33215195 (PubMedID)
Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-09-15 Laget: 2021-09-15 Sist oppdatert: 2022-02-25bibliografisk kontrollert
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6114-4436