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Jönsson, Fredrik U.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4280-4301
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Publications (10 of 59) Show all publications
Oscarsson, M., Rozental, A., Ginsberg, Y., Carlbring, P., Andersson, G. & Jönsson, F. U. (2024). Internet interventions for working adults with ADHD: a randomized trial of cognitive-behavioral versus mindfulness stress-management. In: SweSRII 2024: The 13th Swedish Congress on Internet Interventions Stockholm University, 20-21 May 2024.. Paper presented at The 13th Swedish Congress on Internet Interventions Stockholm University, 20-21 May 2024, Stockholm, Sweden. (pp. 7-7). Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internet interventions for working adults with ADHD: a randomized trial of cognitive-behavioral versus mindfulness stress-management
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2024 (English)In: SweSRII 2024: The 13th Swedish Congress on Internet Interventions Stockholm University, 20-21 May 2024., Linköping University Electronic Press, 2024, p. 7-7Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder, affecting 2-7% of adults worldwide. Adults with ADHD experience heightened levels of stress and fatigue, and ADHD is likely to be an underlying factor in cases of exhaustion. Despite growing evidence on the assessment and treatment of adult ADHD, many patients remain underdiagnosed and undertreated, largely due to barriers such as lack of recognition, misunderstandings, and limited access to specialized care. Internet-delivered cognitive behavior therapy presents an opportunity for increasing access to psychological interventions, though the evidence for its efficacy remains underexplored for adult ADHD. METHODS A total of 240 participants will be recruited and randomly assigned to one of three conditions: Internet-based cognitive-behavioral stress-management (42%); Internet-based mindfulness stress-management (42%); or Wait-list control (16%). Participants in the intervention groups take part in twelve-module, twelve-week interventions with clinical support on demand. Outcome measures include self-reported quality of life (primary outcome measure), symptoms of ADHD, perceived stress, symptoms of exhaustion, depression, and anxiety. DISCUSSION The cognitive-behavioral stress- management intervention has shown promise in a previous single-arm open trial. In this study, we aim to further evaluate its efficacy by comparing it to an active mindfulness intervention and a wait-list control. This allows us to control for the expectation of benefit and common factors of internet interventions. Additionally, the inclusion of a wait-list control condition enables us to account for spontaneous improvement and regression toward the mean. Should the cognitive-behavioral intervention prove beneficial and efficacious, it could undergo further development and potentially be disseminated to a wider audience, either through routine healthcare or as a packaged product.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping University Electronic Press, 2024
Keywords
internet interventions, adhd, working adults, cognitive-behavioral stress-management, mindfulness stress-management
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-231480 (URN)
Conference
The 13th Swedish Congress on Internet Interventions Stockholm University, 20-21 May 2024, Stockholm, Sweden.
Available from: 2024-06-24 Created: 2024-06-24 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson, M., Rozental, A., Ginsberg, Y., Carlbring, P., Andersson, G. & Jönsson, F. U. (2023). A Novel Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Stress-Management Program for Working Adults With ADHD. In: Younghee Choi & Simon Blackwell (Ed.), Abstract Book of the 10th World Congress of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies. Global CBT Dissemination, Accessibility and New Technology: Open Papers 41: Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and ADHD. Paper presented at 10th World Congress of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies, Seoul, Korea. 1–4 June, 2023. (pp. 477-477).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Novel Internet-Based Cognitive-Behavioral Stress-Management Program for Working Adults With ADHD
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2023 (English)In: Abstract Book of the 10th World Congress of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies. Global CBT Dissemination, Accessibility and New Technology: Open Papers 41: Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and ADHD / [ed] Younghee Choi & Simon Blackwell, 2023, p. 477-477Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: In the last few decades, the proportion of sickness absence due to psychiatric diagnoses has increased drastically. This can be attributed to several factors, including a transition from physical to psychosocial strain at work, and difficulties balancing full-time employment alongside family obligations. A population that may have certain difficulties balancing work, leisure, and family, is adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Adults with ADHD are more stressed, more often on sick leave, and receive sickness absence recommendations to a greater extent than adults without ADHD. Thus, it is urgent to manage and prevent stress and other work- related mental illnesses in this population. This project evaluates the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of an internet-based cognitive- behavioral stress-management program, developed specifically for this at-risk population.

Method: The novel stress-management program is based on existing support and interventions for ADHD adults. It is also inspired by existing support and interventions for relevant psychological disorders based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) principles. This includes both tailored and transdiagnostic CBT applications. The development includes thoroughly assessing previous research, including quantitative and qualitative studies, meta-analyses, and literature reviews. The most relevant and effective material is adapted to the internet format and the ADHD-adult population. Modules include information and exercises on: how ADHD symptoms affect work, leisure, and relationships; planning and prioritizing on and off the job; communication, assertiveness, and setting boundaries; sleep and recovery; and more. The program will be evaluated in a pilot study during the spring of 2023, revised, and later tested in a randomized controlled trial.

Results: At the time of writing, recruitment to the pilot study is about to begin. Preliminary results are expected to be presented at the 10th World Congress of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies in Seoul.

Discussion: Despite the fact that many adults with ADHD are more stressed, more often on sick leave, and receive sickness absence recommendations to a greater extent than adults without ADHD, few studies have explored the possibility to manage and prevent these negative outcomes. This project will further the knowledge of possible ways to manage and prevent stress and other work-related mental illness among ADHD adults. If the internet-based CBT stress-management program shows promising results, it could quickly be made available to caregivers and/or the public, conceivably conserving considerable resources for individuals, employers, and society.

Keywords
internet-based, CBT, stress-management program, working adults, ADHD
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-218886 (URN)
Conference
10th World Congress of Cognitive and Behavioral Therapies, Seoul, Korea. 1–4 June, 2023.
Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2023-09-29Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson, M., Rozental, A., Ginsberg, Y., Carlbring, P., Andersson, G. & Jönsson, F. U. (2023). A pilot study of an internet-based stress-management program for working adults with ADHD. In: : . Paper presented at 9th World Congress on ADHD – Early Career Researcher meeting, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 17–18 May, 2023..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A pilot study of an internet-based stress-management program for working adults with ADHD
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction and objectives: Adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more stressed, more often on sick leave, and receive sickness absence recommendations to a greater extent than adults without ADHD. This project evaluates the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of an internet-based stress-management program, developed specifically for this at-risk population.

Methods: The intervention is based on existing support and interventions for ADHD adults, and inspired by support and interventions for relevant psychological disorders. The development includes a thorough assessment of previous research. The most relevant and effective material is adapted to the internet format and the ADHD-adult population. The program is evaluated in a pilot study during the spring of 2023, and will later be tested in a randomized controlled trial.

Results: At the time of writing, 36 participants have recently started the intervention. Preliminary results are expected to be presentable at the 9th World Congress on ADHD in Amsterdam.

Discussion: Although adults with ADHD experience more stress and are more often on sick leave than their non-ADHD peers, there has been limited research on methods to manage and prevent these negative outcomes. If this stress-management program shows promising results, it could quickly be made available to caregivers and/or the public, possibly saving considerable resources for individuals, employers, and society.

Keywords
ADHD, stress management, internet intervention
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-218855 (URN)
Conference
9th World Congress on ADHD – Early Career Researcher meeting, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 17–18 May, 2023.
Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2023-09-29Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson, M., Nelson, M., Rozental, A., Ginsberg, Y., Carlbring, P. & Jönsson, F. U. (2023). A qualitative study of stress and work-related mental illness among working adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. In: : . Paper presented at 9th World Congress on ADHD – Modernising the concept of ADHD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 18-21 May, 2023..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A qualitative study of stress and work-related mental illness among working adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Many adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) underperform professionally, are more stressed, and have more days of sickness absence than adults without ADHD. Still, few studies have explored ADHD adults’ experiences of working life. This study aimed to explore the broad experience of working as an adult with ADHD, specifically explore stress and work-related mental illness among adults with ADHD, and identify needs to prevent these negative outcomes.

Methods: In-depth semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 20 working adults with ADHD. Topics in the interviews included how the ADHD diagnosis and/or symptoms of ADHD may have affected participants on the job, how work may have affected participants’ well-being, and the need for support and accommodation. A conventional approach to qualitative content analysis was used to explore verbatim transcripts from the interviews.

Results: The analysis yielded three themes of everyday experiences of working with ADHD: Working and living with ADHD, Needs, and Special abilities. These themes included eight subcategories: Specific challenges; Relationships and cooperation; Negative consequences; Planning, prioritization, organization, and structure; Support, interventions, accommodations, and aids; Openness, understanding, and acceptance; Strategies; Strengths and qualities.

Conclusions: The results suggest that further knowledge about the challenges of working with ADHD is needed in workplaces; where organizational support is lacking, much in terms of accommodations and aids is up to the employee, and the disclosure of diagnoses may be associated with a great dilemma. The results may also inform other social partners, e.g., labor organizations and work environment authorities, and advise regulations, recommendations, and legislation.

Keywords
adhd, adults, stress, work-related mental illness
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Epidemiology; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-218857 (URN)
Conference
9th World Congress on ADHD – Modernising the concept of ADHD, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 18-21 May, 2023.
Available from: 2023-06-26 Created: 2023-06-26 Last updated: 2023-09-29Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson, M., Nelson, M., Rozental, A., Ginsberg, Y., Carlbring, P. & Jönsson, F. U. (2022). Developing an internet-based stress-management program for working adults with ADHD. In: Abstracts from the 11th Swedish Congress on internet interventions (SWEsrii), Gothenburg, Sweden, 23-24 May 2022: . Paper presented at SweSRII 2022. The 11th Swedish Congress on Internet Interventions, Gothenburg, 23-24 May 2022. (pp. 9-9). Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Developing an internet-based stress-management program for working adults with ADHD
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2022 (English)In: Abstracts from the 11th Swedish Congress on internet interventions (SWEsrii), Gothenburg, Sweden, 23-24 May 2022, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2022, p. 9-9Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The proportion of sickness absence due to psychiatric diagnoses has increased drastically. It is reasonable to assume that ADHD adults are overly represented in these cases. Thus, it is urgent to manage and prevent work-related mental illness in this population. Yet, the possibilities of doing so have not been studied extensively. Therefore, this project evaluates the feasibility, acceptability, and effects of an internet-based stress-management program developed specifically for this at-risk population. In this presentation, the protocol for developing and assessing the program is presented, including ADHD adults’ attitudes toward the program and comparing current interventions.

Methods: To assess attitudes toward the program, transcripts from 20 interviews with ADHD adults were explored using descriptive thematic analysis. The interviews focused on the scope, content, and duration of the proposed intervention and the design and possible inclusion of therapist support. The program will be based on existing support and interventions for ADHD adults. The development will include a thorough assessment of previous research, including quantitative and qualitative studies, meta-analyses, and literature reviews. The most relevant and effective material will be adapted to the internet format and the ADHD-adult population.

Results and discussion: This project will further the knowledge of possible ways to manage and prevent work-related mental illness among ADHD adults, including related sickness absence. If the proposed program shows promising results, it could quickly be made available to caregivers and/or the public, conceivably conserving considerable resources for individuals, employers, and society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press, 2022
Keywords
internet-based, stress-management, ADHD, adults
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-208137 (URN)
Conference
SweSRII 2022. The 11th Swedish Congress on Internet Interventions, Gothenburg, 23-24 May 2022.
Available from: 2022-08-19 Created: 2022-08-19 Last updated: 2023-01-03Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, P. U., Lindholm, T. & Jönsson, F. U. (2022). Eyewitness accuracy and retrieval effort: Effects of time and repetition. PLOS ONE, 17(9), Article ID e0273455.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Eyewitness accuracy and retrieval effort: Effects of time and repetition
2022 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 9, article id e0273455Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An important task for the law enforcement is to assess the accuracy of eyewitness testimonies. Recent research show that indicators of effortful memory retrieval, such as pausing and hedging (e.g. “I think”, “maybe”), are more common in incorrect recall. However, a limitation in these studies is that participants are interviewed shortly after witnessing an event, as opposed to after greater retention intervals. We set out to mitigate this shortcoming by investigating the retrieval effort-accuracy relationship over time. In this study, participants watched a staged crime and were interviewed directly afterwards, and two weeks later. Half the participants also carried out a repetition task during the two-week retention interval. Results showed that the retrieval-effort cues Delays and Hedges predicted accuracy at both sessions, including after repetition. We also measured confidence, and found that confidence also predicted accuracy over time, although repetition led to increased confidence for incorrect memories. Moreover, retrieval-effort cues partially mediated between accuracy and confidence. 

Keywords
adult, article, crime, female, human, human experiment, information retrieval, male, memory, witness, association, recall, cues, humans, mental recall
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-212033 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0273455 (DOI)000933379100024 ()36070290 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85137736349 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Magnus Bergvall Foundation, 2018-02708
Available from: 2022-12-01 Created: 2022-12-01 Last updated: 2024-06-12Bibliographically approved
Oscarsson, M., Nelson, M., Rozental, A., Ginsberg, Y., Carlbring, P. & Jönsson, F. U. (2022). Stress and work-related mental illness among working adults with ADHD: a qualitative study. BMC Psychiatry, 22(1), Article ID 751.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress and work-related mental illness among working adults with ADHD: a qualitative study
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2022 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Though many adults with ADHD underperform professionally, are more stressed, and have more days of sickness absence compared to adults without ADHD, few studies have explored the experience of working as an adult with ADHD. This study explores the general experience of working with ADHD, including stress and work-related mental illness.

Methods: Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 20 working adults with ADHD. Interview topics included how the ADHD diagnosis and/or symptoms of ADHD may have affected participants on the job, how work may have affected participants’ well-being, and the need for support and accommodation. Qualitative content analysis was used to explore verbatim transcripts from the interviews.

Results: The analysis yielded three themes that describe some of the challenges of working with ADHD: Working and living with ADHD, Needs, and Special abilities, with a total of eight subcategories. Subcategories were Specific challenges; Relationships and cooperation; Negative consequences; Planning, prioritization, organization, and structure; Support, interventions, accommodations, and aids; Openness, understanding, and acceptance; Strategies; Strengths and qualities.

Conclusion: Further knowledge about the challenges of working with ADHD is needed in workplaces; where organizational support is lacking, much in terms of accommodations and aids is up to the employee, and the disclosure of diagnoses may be associated with great dilemma.

Keywords
adult adhd, work, stress, mental health, qualitative content analysis
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-212377 (URN)10.1186/s12888-022-04409-w (DOI)000892991500006 ()36451126 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143090678 (Scopus ID)
Note

This study was made possible through a generous grant from Region Stockholm (FoUI-941466). The funder had no role in the study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Open access funding provided by Stockholm University.

Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2024-05-27Bibliographically approved
Kubik, V., Jemstedt, A., Mahjub Eshratabadi, H., Schwartz, B. L. & Jönsson, F. U. (2022). The underconfidence-with-practice effect in action memory: The contribution of retrieval practice to metacognitive monitoring. Metacognition and Learning, 17(2), 375-398
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The underconfidence-with-practice effect in action memory: The contribution of retrieval practice to metacognitive monitoring
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2022 (English)In: Metacognition and Learning, ISSN 1556-1623, E-ISSN 1556-1631, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 375-398Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When making memory predictions (judgments of learning; JOLs), people typically underestimate the recall gain across multiple study–test cycles, termed the underconfidence-with-practice (UWP) effect. This is usually studied with verbal materials, but little is known about how people repeatedly learn and monitor their own actions and to what extent retrieval practice via interim tests influence the progression of JOLs across cycles. Using action phrases (i.e., squeeze the lemon) as learning material, we demonstrated the UWP effect after both verbal and enactive encoding, although we did not get first-cycle overconfidence. As predicted, participants exhibited underconfidence in Cycles 2 and 3, as an error of calibrations. However, people’s resolution of JOLs (i.e., ability to discriminate recalled from unrecalled items) increased across study–test cycles. Importantly, JOLs for study–test (relative to study–study) items increased faster across cycles suggesting that repeated study–test practice not only produces underconfidence across cycles, but also reduces underconfidence relative to study–study practice. We discuss these findings in terms of current explanations of the underconfidence-with-practice effect.

Keywords
underconfidence-with-practice effect, judgments of learning, study-test practice, metacognitive monitoring, enactment, action phrases
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-201880 (URN)10.1007/s11409-021-09288-2 (DOI)000744762500001 ()2-s2.0-85123259035 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-10 Created: 2022-02-10 Last updated: 2023-01-03Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, P. U., Lindholm, T. & Jönsson, F. U. (2021). Judging the accuracy of eyewitness testimonies using retrieval effort cues. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 35(5), 1224-1235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Judging the accuracy of eyewitness testimonies using retrieval effort cues
2021 (English)In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, ISSN 0888-4080, E-ISSN 1099-0720, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 1224-1235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recent research has shown that incorrect statements in eyewitness testimonies contain more cues to effortful memory retrieval than correct statements. In two experiments, we attempted to improve judgments of testimony accuracy by informing participants about these effort cues. Participants read eyewitness testimony transcripts and judged statement accuracy. Performance was above chance in both experiments, but there was only a significant effect of the effort-cue instruction in Experiment 2. In Experiment 1, we also compared judgment accuracy between police detectives, police students and laypersons, and found no significant difference, in contrast to previous studies. Moreover, the current study corroborates previous findings that (a) judging testimony accuracy is a difficult task and (b) people spontaneously rely on effort cues to some extent when judging accuracy. However, a complete reliance on effort cues showed substantially better performance than relying on one's own judgments skills at best, and offered equal performance at worst.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
eyewitness accuracy, eyewitness memory, eyewitness testimony, judgment accuracy, retrieval effort cues
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-195832 (URN)10.1002/acp.3854 (DOI)000662177400001 ()
Note

This research was supported by a grant from the Elisabeth and Herman Rhodin Memorial Foundation and from The Lars Hierta Memorial Foundation.

Available from: 2021-08-31 Created: 2021-08-31 Last updated: 2023-04-13Bibliographically approved
Rosa, E., Eiken, O., Grönkvist, M., Kölegård, R., Dahlström, N., Knez, I., . . . Willander, J. (2020). Effects of Fatigue on Cognitive Performance in Long-Duration Simulated Flight Missions. Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors, 10(2), 82-93
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Fatigue on Cognitive Performance in Long-Duration Simulated Flight Missions
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2020 (English)In: Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors, ISSN 2192-0923, E-ISSN 2192-0931, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 82-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fighter pilots may be exposed to extended flight missions. Consequently, there is increasing concern about fatigue. We investigated the effects of fatigue and cognitive performance in a simulated 11-hr mission in the 39 Gripen fighter aircraft. Five cognitive tasks were used to assess cognitive performance. Fatigue was measured with the Samn–Perelli Fatigue Index. Results showed that performance in the non-executive task degraded after approximately 7 hr. Fatigue ratings showed a matching trend to the performance in this task. Performance in tasks taxing executive functions did not decline. We interpreted that fatigue can be overridden by increased attentional effort for executive tasks but not for non-executive components of cognition. Participants underestimated their performance and metacognitive accuracy was not influenced by fatigue.

Keywords
long-duration flight missions, fatigue, cognitive performance, metacognition
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-187989 (URN)10.1027/2192-0923/a000191 (DOI)
Available from: 2020-12-18 Created: 2020-12-18 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4280-4301

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