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Publications (10 of 72) Show all publications
Hansson, K., Bardzell, S., Bhandari, A., Boulicault, M., Thomas Doyle, D., Erete, S., . . . Watson, J. (2023). A Toolbox of Feminist Wonder: Theories and methods that can make a difference. In: Casey Fiesler, Loren Terveen, Morgan Ames, Susan Fussell, Eric Gilbert, Vera Liao, Xiaojuan Ma, Xinru Page, Mark Rouncefield, Vivek Singh, Pamela Wisniewski (Ed.), CSCW '23 Companion: Companion Publication of the 2023 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing. Paper presented at CSCW '23: Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing Minneapolis MN USA October 14 - 18, 2023. (pp. 476-480). Association for Computing Machinery (ACM)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Toolbox of Feminist Wonder: Theories and methods that can make a difference
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2023 (English)In: CSCW '23 Companion: Companion Publication of the 2023 Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing / [ed] Casey Fiesler, Loren Terveen, Morgan Ames, Susan Fussell, Eric Gilbert, Vera Liao, Xiaojuan Ma, Xinru Page, Mark Rouncefield, Vivek Singh, Pamela Wisniewski, Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) , 2023, p. 476-480Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

theoretical and methodological approaches that have provided us with useful tools to see things differently and make space for change. Since its inception over a decade ago, feminist HCI has progressed from the margins to mainstream HCI, with numerous references in the literature. Feminist HCI has also evolved to incorporate other critical HCI practices such as Queer HCI, participatory design, and speculative design. While feminist approaches have grown in popularity and become mainstream, it is getting more difficult to distinguish the feminist emancipatory core from other attempts of developing and improving society in various ways. In this workshop, we therefore want to revisit our feminist roots, where theory is a liberatory and creative practice, motivated by affect, curiosity, and wonder. From this standpoint, we consider which of our feminist tools can make a significant difference today, in a highly datafied world. The goal of this workshop is to; 1) create an inventory of feminist theories and concepts that have had an impact on our work as designers, educators, researchers, and activists; 2) develop a feminist toolbox for the CSCW community to strengthen our feminist literacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), 2023
Keywords
Decolonization, Care, Intersectionality, Feminist HCI, Feminist wonder
National Category
Other Computer and Information Science
Research subject
Computer and Systems Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224930 (URN)10.1145/3584931.3611295 (DOI)2-s2.0-85176250268 (Scopus ID)9798400701290 (ISBN)
Conference
CSCW '23: Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing Minneapolis MN USA October 14 - 18, 2023.
Available from: 2024-01-02 Created: 2024-01-02 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Hansson, K. & Näslund Dahlgren, A. (2022). Choice, Negotiation, and Pluralism: a Conceptual Framework for Participatory Technologies in Museum Collections. Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices (31), 603-631
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Choice, Negotiation, and Pluralism: a Conceptual Framework for Participatory Technologies in Museum Collections
2022 (English)In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, no 31, p. 603-631Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In an era of big data and fake news, museums' collection practices are particularly important democratic cornerstones. Participatory technologies such as crowdsourcing or wikis have been put forward as a means to make museum collections more open and searchable, motivated by a desire for efficiency but also as a way to engage the public in the development of a more diverse and polyphonic heritage. However, there is a lack of a nuanced vocabulary to describe participatory technologies in terms of democracy. Without a deeper understanding of how technology shapes the overall structures, there is a risk that the tools instead undermine democratic ambitions.

Addressing the need to conceptualize democracy in these contexts, we therefore develop a framework for participatory technologies with an eye toward the long-term development and preservation of cultural heritage. In this framework different democratic processes intersect with democratic values, from a liberal conception of democracy to a more deliberative democracy, to an agonistic pluralism emphasizing the importance of acknowledging conflict and diversity.

To firmly ground our vocabulary in museum collection practices, we have investigated two cases from museums in the US that have opposite participatory strategies for enriching images with metadata; the Smithsonian Transcription Center, and the National Gallery of Art collection on Wikimedia Commons. These cases demonstrate how the framework can be used to identify patterns of participation showing the support for different values and processes.

Furthermore, our conceptual investigation points out a contradiction in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) research, between the pluralism and conflicts emphasized in more critical and participatory design perspectives used in the development of design, and the features in the actual design of participatory technologies, emphasizing consistency and access.

Keywords
Crowdsourcing, Participatory technologies, Digital heritage, Metadata, Participatory museum, Value sensitive design, Authorized heritage discourse
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-209265 (URN)10.1007/s10606-022-09441-8 (DOI)000850428000006 ()
Available from: 2022-09-14 Created: 2022-09-14 Last updated: 2023-08-24Bibliographically approved
Hansson, K. & Näslund Dahlgren, A. (2022). Crowdsourcing historical photographs: autonomy and control at the Copenhagen City Archives. Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices (31), 1-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Crowdsourcing historical photographs: autonomy and control at the Copenhagen City Archives
2022 (English)In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, no 31, p. 1-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study of crowdsourcing practices at Kbhbilleder.dk at the Copenhagen City Archives provides a rich description of how motivation and work relations are situated in a wider infrastructure of different tools and social settings. Approximately, 94% of the work is here done by 7 of the 2,433 participants. The article contributes insights into how these super-taggers carry out their work, describing and placing images on a map, through an extensive discursive effort that takes place outside the institution’s more limited interface in private discussion forums with over 60 000 participants. The more exploratory qualitative work that is going on in different discussion groups does not fit within the archive’s technical framework. Instead, alternative archives are growing within privately owned networks, where participants’ own collections merge with images from public archives. Rather than focusing on the nature of participants’ motivation, the article suggests a relational perspective on participation that is useful for analyzing a systems’ support for participation. Pointing out how people’s motivation in citizen science correspond with relational and intra-relational aspects enables an approach to system design that potentially supports or counteracts these aspects.

Keywords
Crowdsourcing, alienation, motivation, metadata, super-taggers, visual heritage, citizen science
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects Art History
Research subject
Information Systems; Knowledge and Communication; Art History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-199630 (URN)10.1007/s10606-021-09418-z (DOI)000725363700002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-01068Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2021-12-12 Created: 2021-12-12 Last updated: 2023-08-24Bibliographically approved
Hansson, K., Näslund Dahlgren, A. & Cerratto Pargman, T. (2022). Datafication and Cultural Heritage: Critical Perspectives on Exhibition and Collection Practices. Information and culture, 57(1), 1-5
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Datafication and Cultural Heritage: Critical Perspectives on Exhibition and Collection Practices
2022 (English)In: Information and culture, ISSN 2164-8034, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 1-5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The increasing digitiza-ti on and the emergence of new data-sharing practices change our understanding of how cultural heritage is de -fined, collected, and exhibited. We must pay particular attention to the ways in which digital interfaces curate history. Crowdsourcing, social media, linked open data, and other open science practices challenge the current practices of cul-tural heritage institutions, owing to the established structures between and within them and the char-acter of the networked publics involved. Howev-er, such challenges also open new opportunities for wider negotiations of cultural heritage and rethinking what cultural heritage institutions and practices are. This spe-cial issue brings together scholars from different disciplines to provide critically and empirically grounded perspectives on the datafication of cul-tural heritage institutions' exhibition and collection practices.

Keywords
digital heritage, datafication digital, humanities critical, archival studies
National Category
Media and Communications Other Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-204464 (URN)10.7560/IC57101 (DOI)000773378900001 ()2-s2.0-85127021894 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-08 Created: 2022-05-08 Last updated: 2022-05-08Bibliographically approved
Hansson, K. & Näslund Dahlgren, A. (2022). Open research data repositories: Practices, norms, and metadata for sharing images. Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, 73(2), 303-316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open research data repositories: Practices, norms, and metadata for sharing images
2022 (English)In: Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, ISSN 2330-1635, E-ISSN 2330-1643, Vol. 73, no 2, p. 303-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Open research data repositories are promoted as one of the cornerstones in the open research paradigm, promoting collaboration, interoperability, and large-scale sharing and reuse. There is, however, a lack of research investigating what these sharing platforms actually share and a more critical interface analysis of the norms and practices embedded in this datafication of academic practice is needed. This article takes image data sharing in the humanities as a case study for investigating the possibilities and constraints in 5 open research data repositories. By analyzing the visual and textual content of the interface along with the technical means for metadata, the study shows how the platforms are differentiated in terms of signifiers of research paradigms, but that beneath the rhetoric of the interface, they are designed in a similar way, which does not correspond well with the image researchers' need for detailed metadata. Combined with the problem of copyright limitations, these data-sharing tools are simply not sophisticated enough when it comes to sharing and reusing images. The result also corresponds with previous research showing that these tools are used not so much for sharing research data, but more for promoting researcher personas.

National Category
Computer and Information Sciences Art History
Research subject
Art History; Information Systems; Knowledge and Communication
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-198332 (URN)10.1002/asi.24571 (DOI)000688067400001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-06057
Available from: 2021-11-03 Created: 2021-11-03 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Hansson, K., Cerratto-Pargman, T. & Bardzell, S. (2021). Materializing activism. Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 5-6(30), 617-626
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Materializing activism
2021 (English)In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work, ISSN 1431-1496, Vol. 5-6, no 30, p. 617-626Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Online activism showcases how available digital tools allow social movements to emerge, scale up, and extend globally by fundamentally enabling new forms of power. This special issue brings together eight research articles that engage with the collaborative efforts embedded in various types of activism by studying features such as the socio-technical systems involved; how the activism is organized; relations between traditional and social media; and the complex network of systems, information, people, values, theories, histories, ideologies, and aesthetics that constitutes such activisms. The articles show the spaces in which this activism materializes, and particularly their situation in several intersecting dimensions including motivation, culture, language, and infrastructure. Together, these articles reflect the methodological breadth required to materialize online activism and the need to develop a more nuanced conceptualization of the media ecologies involved. By mapping out how activism is enabled and constrained by human-computer interfaces, this special issue contributes to open up the black box of online activism.

National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Man-Machine-Interaction (MMI)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200623 (URN)10.1007/s10606-021-09412-5 (DOI)
Available from: 2022-01-08 Created: 2022-01-08 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Hansson, K., Sveningsson, M. & Ganetz, H. (2021). Organizing Safe Spaces: #MeToo Activism in Sweden. Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices, 30(5-6), 651-682
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing Safe Spaces: #MeToo Activism in Sweden
2021 (English)In: Computer Supported Cooperative Work: The Journal of Collaborative Computing and Work Practices, ISSN 0925-9724, E-ISSN 1573-7551, Vol. 30, no 5-6, p. 651-682Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Networked online environments can effectively support political activism. In Sweden, the #metoo movement resulted in over 100,000 people participating in activities challenging sexual harassment and abuse, including collecting testimonies via social media and drafting and discussing petitions published in print news media. Participation involved many risks, such as social stigma, losing one's job, or misogynist terrorism, which meant that participation required a high level of trust among peers. Human-computer interaction (HCI) research on trust generally focuses on technical systems or user-generated data, less focus has been given to trust among peers in vulnerable communities. This study, based on semi-structured interviews and surveys of participants and organizers of 47 petitions representing different sectors in society, found that trust was aggregated over networks of people, practices, institutions, shared values, and technical systems. Although a supportive culture based on a feeling of solidarity and shared feminist values was central for safe spaces for participation, when activism was scaled up, social interaction had to be limited due to increased risk. HCI research views trust as a process of crossing distances, increasing over time; however, our results reveal that trust decreased over time as the movement grew and public exposure increased, a trend most evident when the participants actually came from a tightly knit community. Therefore, this study points out the significance to balance the need for transparency and community with the need for anonymity and distance in the development of tools to support large-scale deliberative processes that involve conflicts and risks.

Keywords
Hashtag activism, Metoo, Net activism, Trust, Social movements
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-199657 (URN)10.1007/s10606-021-09410-7 (DOI)000714311900001 ()
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2023-08-24Bibliographically approved
Dahlgren, A. & Hansson, K. (2021). What an Image Is: The Ontological Gap between Researchers and Information Specialists. Art Documentation, 40(1), 21-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What an Image Is: The Ontological Gap between Researchers and Information Specialists
2021 (English)In: Art Documentation, ISSN 0730-7187, E-ISSN 2161-9417, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates how images are understood inside and outside heritage institutions. It focuses on information specialists in libraries, archives, and museums and on a very specific yet substantial end-user group for visual heritage material: university scholars in the humanities. Based on a survey on the production and use of descriptive metadata, this study discloses that there is an ontological divide between these two groups, and that the extensive production of descriptive metadata does not match the needs and interest of researchers in the humanities, but rather other end users. An increased dialogue is needed between these two groups concerning what metadata should be attached to images. This potentially could lead to a broader and more extended scholarly use of visual heritage material.

National Category
Other Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-196417 (URN)10.1086/714147 (DOI)000657293000003 ()
Available from: 2021-09-08 Created: 2021-09-08 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Hansson, K., Cerratto Pargman, T. & Dahlgren, A. (2020). Datafication and cultural heritage: Provocations, threats, and design opportunities. In: Proceedings of 18th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: . Paper presented at European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Siegen, Germany, June 13-17, 2020. European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Datafication and cultural heritage: Provocations, threats, and design opportunities
2020 (English)In: Proceedings of 18th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET) , 2020Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Increasing digitization and the emergence of new data sharing practices are likely to change how our understanding of history is negotiated. The curation of data is always culturally and ideologically inflected. Accordingly, archiving practices are not only fundamental for our understanding of the past but vital in navigating the present. We have to pay particular attention to the consequences of the interfaces that curate history, especially in relation to big data. Crowdsourcing, social media, linked open data, and other participatory and open science practices challenge the archiving practices in cultural heritage institutions due to the character of the networked publics involved and the established structures between and within institutions. However, they also open up new opportunities and practices when it comes to understanding and defining our shared culture. In this workshop we will bring together researchers who have studied these issues or are working to develop critical perspectives on archiving practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies (EUSSET), 2020
Series
Reports of the European Society for Socially Embedded Technologies, E-ISSN 2510-2591 ; vol. 4, no. 2
National Category
Other Computer and Information Science Media and Communications
Research subject
Man-Machine-Interaction (MMI); Media and Communication Studies; Art History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-186984 (URN)10.18420/ecscw2020_ws05 (DOI)
Conference
European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work, Siegen, Germany, June 13-17, 2020
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2020-11-30 Created: 2020-11-30 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Dahlgren, A., Hansson, K., Reichert, R. & Wasielewski, A. (2020). Introduction: The Politics of Metadata. Digital Culture & Society, 6(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: The Politics of Metadata
2020 (English)In: Digital Culture & Society, ISSN 2364-2114, E-ISSN 2364-2122, Vol. 6, no 2Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Keywords
metadata
National Category
Art History Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Art History; Computer and Systems Sciences; Informatics and System Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-192006 (URN)10.14361/dcs-2020-0202 (DOI)
Projects
The Politics of Metadata (VR)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-01068
Available from: 2021-04-08 Created: 2021-04-08 Last updated: 2022-09-07Bibliographically approved
Projects
#metoo activism in Sweden: Development, consequences, strategies [2018-01824_VR]; Södertörn University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5962-1536

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