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Kjellsson, S., Rajaleid, K. & Modin, B. (2024). Using emulated clinical trials to investigate the risk of being diagnosed with psychiatric ill health following the cancer diagnosis of a sibling. PLOS ONE, 19(4), Article ID e0298175.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Using emulated clinical trials to investigate the risk of being diagnosed with psychiatric ill health following the cancer diagnosis of a sibling
2024 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 4, article id e0298175Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

The sibling bond is often the longest relationship in an individual’s life, spanning both good and bad times. Focusing on the latter, we investigated whether a cancer diagnosis in one adult sibling is predictive of psychiatric illness in the other, and if any such effect differs according the ‘sociodemographic closeness’ between the siblings in terms of sex, age, education, marital status and residence.

Methods

We used hospital records to identify psychiatric diagnoses (2005–2019) in a Swedish total-population cohort born in 1953, and cancer diagnoses (2005–2017) in their full siblings. By means of emulated clinical trials, the cohort member’s risk of a diagnosis within two years following a first exposure (or non-exposure) to a sibling’s cancer was analyzed through Cox regression.

Results

Exposed cohort members had a higher risk of psychiatric diagnosis than unexposed (HR = 1.15; CI: 1.08–1.23), with men displaying a higher risk (1.19; CI: 1.09–1.31) than women (HR = 1.11; CI: 1.01–1.22). Sub-analyses of the exposed group showed that women with a cancer-stricken sister had a higher risk of adverse psychiatric outcomes (HR = 1.31; CI: 1.07–1.61) than women with a cancer-stricken brother. Furthermore, unmarried cohort members ran a higher risk, both when the cancer-stricken sibling was married (HR = 2.03; CI: 1.67–2.46) and unmarried (HR = 2.61; CI: 2.16–3.15), than in cases where both siblings were married. No corresponding difference were detected for ‘closeness’ in age, education and residence.

Conclusions

In line with theories of linked lives, our findings suggest that negative events in one sibling’s life tend to ‘spill over’ on the other sibling’s wellbeing, at least during the 15-year-long period leading up to retirement age.

National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-231157 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0298175 (DOI)001207320100058 ()38635588 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85190841417 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-06-25 Created: 2024-06-25 Last updated: 2024-06-25Bibliographically approved
Almquist, Y. B., Östberg, V. & Modin, B. (2023). Is there a peer status gradient in mortality? Findings from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and followed to age 67. European Journal of Public Health, 33(2), 184-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is there a peer status gradient in mortality? Findings from a Swedish cohort born in 1953 and followed to age 67
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 184-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Similar to having a less advantaged socioeconomic position, children in lower peer status positions typically experience a situation characterized by less power, influence and command over resources, followed by worse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine whether peer status position is further associated with increased risks for premature all-cause mortality. Methods Data were drawn from a 1953 cohort born in Stockholm, Sweden. Peer status positions were established through survey data on peer nominations within the school class at age 13, whereas national registers were used to identify all-cause mortality across ages 14-67. Differences in hazard rates and median survival time, according to peer status position, were estimated with Cox regression and Laplace regression, respectively. Results Although differences in hazard rates were not large, they were consistent and clear, also after taking childhood socioeconomic status into account. Regarding median survival time, the number of years lost increased gradually as peer status decreased, with a difference of almost 6 years when comparing individuals in the lowest and highest positions. Conclusions Children's positions in the peer status hierarchy play a role for their chances of health and survival, pointing to the relevance of addressing opportunities for positive peer interaction and mitigating any adverse consequences that may stem from negative experiences within the peer context.

National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215918 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckad030 (DOI)000941599500001 ()36857154 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-03-29 Created: 2023-03-29 Last updated: 2023-04-20Bibliographically approved
Brolin Låftman, S., Magnusson, C., Olsson, G., Wahlström, J. & Modin, B. (2023). Perceived problematic alcohol use in the family and adolescents’ stress-related complaints: examining the buffering role of the school’s degree of student focus as rated by its teachers. BMC Public Health, 23, Article ID 1754.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived problematic alcohol use in the family and adolescents’ stress-related complaints: examining the buffering role of the school’s degree of student focus as rated by its teachers
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2023 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, article id 1754Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background A non-negligible proportion of children grow up with problematic alcohol use in the family. Problematic familial drinking can be regarded as a stressor, and prior studies have consistently reported poorer mental health among adolescents who are exposed. However, it is also of relevance to identify modifiable protective factors which may buffer against stress-related ill-health in this group of adolescents. One context where such factors may be present is the school. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between perceived problematic familial alcohol use and students’ stress-related complaints, and specifically to explore if the school’s degree of student focus can buffer against any such negative health consequences of problem drinking at home.

Methods Data were drawn from four separate surveys, the Stockholm School Survey (SSS) and the Stockholm Teacher Survey (STS) conducted in 2014 and 2016 among 7,944 students (~ 15–16 years) and 2,024 teachers in 147 Stockholm senior-level school units. Perceived problematic familial alcohol use was measured by one item in the SSS. Stress-related complaints were captured by co-occurring somatic complaints and psychological distress, and reported by students in the SSS. The school’s student focus was measured by an index based on teachers’ ratings of four items in the STS. A set of covariates at the student and the school level were also included. Two-level binary logistic and linear regression models were performed.

Results Perceived problematic familial alcohol use was linked with an increased likelihood of reporting co-occurring somatic complaints as well as psychological distress. Cross-level interactions revealed that the association between perceived problematic familial alcohol use and co-occurring somatic complaints was weaker among students attending schools with stronger teacher-rated student focus. Regarding psychological distress, the association was weaker for students attending schools with intermediate or strong teacher-rated student focus, compared with those attending schools with weaker teacher-rated student focus.

Conclusions The findings provide support for the assumption that favourable conditions in schools can buffer against negative health consequences of problematic conditions in the family, thus serving a compensatory role.

Keywords
Alcohol, Stress, Somatic complaints, Psychological distress, Adolescents, School, Compensatory, Contextual, Multilevel
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Sociology; Child and Youth Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221039 (URN)10.1186/s12889-023-16505-x (DOI)001065615700002 ()37684584 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85170341573 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Stockholm University
Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved
Brolin Låftman, S., Modin, B., Granvik Saminathen, M., Östberg, V., Löfstedt, P. & Rajaleid, K. (2023). Psychosocial School Conditions and Mental Wellbeing Among Mid-adolescents: Findings From the 2017/18 Swedish HBSC Study. International Journal of Public Health, 67, Article ID 1605167.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial School Conditions and Mental Wellbeing Among Mid-adolescents: Findings From the 2017/18 Swedish HBSC Study
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2023 (English)In: International Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1661-8556, E-ISSN 1661-8564, Vol. 67, article id 1605167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate mid-adolescent boys’ and girls’ experiences of school demands, teacher support, and classmate support, and explore the associations of these factors with mental wellbeing.

Methods: Data were derived from the Swedish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study of 2017/18, with information collected among 1,418 students in grade 9 (∼15–16 years). School demands, teacher support, and classmate support were measured by indices based on three items each. Mental wellbeing was measured by the Short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale (SWEMWBS). Linear regression analyses were performed.

Results: Higher demands were associated with lower mental wellbeing. Conversely, mental wellbeing increased with greater teacher support and classmate support. Interactions between demands and the support variables showed that at the lowest levels of teacher and of classmate support, mental wellbeing was low and not associated with school demands. With increasing levels of teacher and classmate support, the overall level of mental wellbeing increased and revealed an inverse association between school demands and mental wellbeing.

Conclusion: The study contributes with knowledge about how psychosocial conditions in school may hinder or enhance wellbeing among students.

Keywords
school demands, teacher support, classmate support, wellbeing, school
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215289 (URN)10.3389/ijph.2022.1605167 (DOI)000916533600001 ()36686385 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85146528028 (Scopus ID)
Note

The study was conducted within the research project “Health Behaviour in School-aged Children: Individual and contextual associations with psychological (ill-)health” funded by the Public Health Agency of Sweden. Open access funded by Stockholm University Library.

Available from: 2023-03-23 Created: 2023-03-23 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Olsson, G., Modin, B. & Brolin Låftman, S. (2023). School collective efficacy and gambling: A multilevel study of 11th grade students in Stockholm. Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 40(4), 327-338
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School collective efficacy and gambling: A multilevel study of 11th grade students in Stockholm
2023 (English)In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 327-338Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the present study was to investigate variations between schools when it comes to gambling and risk gambling, and, in particular, to analyse the links between school collective efficacy and student gambling and risk gambling. The data consists of official register information on schools as well as survey data collected in 2016 among 1,061 teachers and 5,191 students in 46 Stockholm upper secondary schools. School collective efficacy was operationalized on the basis of teacher responses, which were aggregated to the school level. Gambling and risk gambling were based on students’ self-reports. Two-level binary logistic regression analyses were performed. The results show that there is between-school variation in gambling and in all the study’s indicators of risk gambling. Both gambling and risk gambling were more commonly reported by students attending schools with weak collective efficacy, even when adjusting for student- and school-level sociodemographic characteristics. The findings suggest that conditions at school may counteract students’ engagement in gambling and risk gambling. 

Keywords
adolescents, collective efficacy, gambling, health risk behaviours, risk gambling, school context
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213826 (URN)10.1177/14550725221143174 (DOI)000899593300001 ()2-s2.0-85144200285 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-20 Created: 2023-01-20 Last updated: 2023-09-11Bibliographically approved
Gurzo, K., Östergren, O., Martikainen, P. & Modin, B. (2023). The Impact of Privileged Classroom Friends on Adult Income and Income Mobility: A Study of a Swedish Cohort Born in 1953 . Social Forces, 102(3), 1068-1088
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Privileged Classroom Friends on Adult Income and Income Mobility: A Study of a Swedish Cohort Born in 1953 
2023 (English)In: Social Forces, ISSN 0037-7732, E-ISSN 1534-7605, Vol. 102, no 3, p. 1068-1088Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social relationships across and within generations are associated with intergenerational income mobility. Parents affect their children’s future opportunities through socialization and by conveying various resources to the child during upbringing. However, self-acquired social contacts of children, such as friendships in school, might also affect long-term outcomes. Children from less privileged homes may gain access to additional resources through contact with privileged friends and their parents. This study examines whether having a classroom friend with high parental income (privileged friend) is associated with upward income mobility. Furthermore, it explores where in the parental income distribution a privileged friend matters most. We use data from the Stockholm Birth Cohort Multigenerational Study (n = 10,641), which is a prospective study of individuals born in 1953 who lived in the greater Stockholm area in 1963. We fit classroom fixed-effects models to estimate the association between having a privileged childhood friend and adult income as well as parental income and adult income along with the interaction of privileged friend and parental income. Results show that cohort members who had a privileged classroom friend had higher adult income, and that this income gain was greater among those whose parents belonged to the lowest income quartile, compared with those whose parents had higher incomes. These results are robust to adjustments for childhood socioeconomic background, personal attributes, and adult educational attainment. Our findings indicate that having an economically privileged friend in the school class bolsters adult income and upward income mobility of children from families with low income.

National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221125 (URN)10.1093/sf/soad079 (DOI)001011834400001 ()2-s2.0-85183706566 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2024-03-11Bibliographically approved
Wahlström, J., Modin, B., Svensson, J., Löfstedt, P. & Brolin Låftman, S. (2023). There’s a tear in my beer: Bullying victimisation and young teenage drinking in Sweden. Children and youth services review, 154, Article ID 107123.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>There’s a tear in my beer: Bullying victimisation and young teenage drinking in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 154, article id 107123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Victims of bullying are at an increased risk not only of developing adverse mental health, but also of engaging in health risk behaviours. One way in which adolescents may cope with the health-related consequences of bullying victimisation is through substance use such as alcohol and narcotics, as posited by the self-medication hypothesis. Indeed, previous research has found a link between traditional (face-to-face) bullying victimisation and alcohol use among adolescents, albeit with some inconsistencies. However, studies examining both traditional bullying and cyberbullying among youth often report an association only between cyberbullying victimisation and drinking. The current study seeks to add to this field of research by analysing the predictive capacity of traditional and cyberbullying victimisation for youth drinking whilst also adjusting for bullying perpetration and sociodemographic characteristics. In the analyses, we distinguished between occasional and frequent victimisation, and performed separate investigations of how specific types of traditional bullying and cyberbullying victimisation are related to youth drinking. Data were obtained from the Swedish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) survey, with pooled cross-sectional information from 2013/14 and 2017/18 collected among 13- and 15-year-old students (n =7126). Any alcohol use and drunkenness during the past 30 days were used as dependent variables. The respondents were categorised as non-victims, occasional victims, and frequent victims of traditional and cyberbullying, respectively. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to examine the associations between bullying victimisation and youth drinking. The results showed that 21.2% of students reported that they had been bullied at least once or twice in the past months, either as victims of traditional bullying only (8.3%), cyberbullying only (7.8%), or both (5.1%). When both types of bullying victimisation were mutually adjusted for, only cyberbullying remained significantly associated with an increased risk of drinking. However, when specific types of face-to-face bullying victimisation were analysed, several statistically significant associations with youth drinking were found, even when controlling for cyberbullying victimisation. Associations with any alcohol use and drunkenness were overall very similar. To conclude, this study corroborates previous research which has shown youth drinking to be more consistently related with cyberbullying victimisation than with traditional bullying victimisation. The study also extends previous knowledge by showing that the association between traditional bullying victimisation and youth drinking differs depending on the operationalisation of victimisation. Future research might benefit from examining this more thoroughly. The findings highlight that interventions targeting bullying and its effects should consider both face-to-face and online victimisation. 

Keywords
Bullying, Cyberbullying, Victimization, Alcohol use, Drunkenness, Adolescents
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220682 (URN)10.1016/j.childyouth.2023.107123 (DOI)001076258900001 ()2-s2.0-85170578317 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2024-05-24Bibliographically approved
Ledberg, A., Rajaleid, K. & Modin, B. (2022). Are there really no causal associations between childhood family income and subsequent outcomes?. International Journal of Epidemiology, 51(6), 2027-2028
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are there really no causal associations between childhood family income and subsequent outcomes?
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 2027-2028Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We read with interest the recent paper by Sariaslan et al.1 investigating the associations between childhood family income and three outcomes observed later in life: psychiatric disorders, substance misuse and violent crime arrests. The paper contains a careful analysis of a large and relevant dataset of more than 650 000 individuals born in Finland in 1986–96, who were followed from age 15, when income was assessed, until 2017 or 2018. The authors use two types of analysis in the paper: one in which differences in the outcomes are accounted for by variability in income between families (henceforth between-family analysis) and one, the so-called sibling comparison, in which outcome differences are accounted for only by income variability within families (henceforth within-family analysis). In the between-family analysis, the authors find consistent associations between a number of related estimates of childhood family income and the three outcomes (e.g. Figure 2 in the paper). However, and this is the main finding of the paper, these associations between income and the three outcomes completely disappear in the within-family analysis. From this, the authors conclude that ‘[a]ssociations between childhood family income and subsequent risks … were not consistent with a causal interpretation’.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-210112 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyac016 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016–07148
Available from: 2022-10-06 Created: 2022-10-06 Last updated: 2023-01-23Bibliographically approved
Gurzo, K., Modin, B., Martikainen, P. & Östergren, O. (2022). Pathways from Childhood Economic Conditions to Adult Mortality in a 1953 Stockholm Cohort: The Intermediate Role of Personal Attributes and Socioeconomic Career. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(12), Article ID 7279.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pathways from Childhood Economic Conditions to Adult Mortality in a 1953 Stockholm Cohort: The Intermediate Role of Personal Attributes and Socioeconomic Career
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 12, article id 7279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although both childhood and adult economic conditions have been found to be associated with mortality, independently or in combination with each other, less is known about the role of intermediate factors between these two life stages. This study explores the pathways between childhood economic conditions and adult mortality by taking personal attributes as well as adult socioeconomic career into consideration. Further, we investigate the role of intergenerational income mobility for adult mortality. We used data from a prospective cohort study of individuals that were born in 1953 and residing in Stockholm, Sweden, in 1963 who were followed for mortality between 2002 and 2021 (n = 11,325). We fit Cox proportional hazards models to assess the association of parental income, cognitive ability, social skills, educational attainment, occupational status, and adult income with mortality. The income mobility is operationalized as the interaction between parental and adult income. Our results show that the association between parental income and adult mortality is modest and largely operates through cognitive ability and adult educational attainment. However, our results do not provide support for there being an effect of intergenerational income mobility on adult mortality. In a Swedish cohort who grew up in a comparatively egalitarian society during the 1950s and 1960s, childhood economic conditions were found to play a distinct but relatively small role for later mortality.

Keywords
childhood conditions, parental income, cognitive ability, adult income, all-cause mortality
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207594 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19127279 (DOI)000816067900001 ()35742527 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85132071768 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-03 Created: 2022-08-03 Last updated: 2022-08-03Bibliographically approved
Brolin Låftman, S., Granvik Saminathen, M., Modin, B. & Löfstedt, P. (2021). Excellent Self-Rated Health among Swedish Boys and Girls and Its Relationship with Working Conditions in School: A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(3), Article ID 1310.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Excellent Self-Rated Health among Swedish Boys and Girls and Its Relationship with Working Conditions in School: A Cross-Sectional Study
2021 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 3, article id 1310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to investigate the extent to which school demands, teacher support, and classmate support were associated with excellent self-rated health among students, and to examine if any such statistical predictions differed by gender. Data were drawn from the Swedish Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study of 2017/18, performed among adolescents in grades five, seven, and nine (n = 3701). Linear probability models showed that school demands were negatively associated with excellent self-rated health, whereas teacher and classmate support showed positive associations. The link with school demands was stronger for girls than boys, driven by the finding that in grades five and nine, school demands were associated with excellent self-rated health only among girls. In conclusion, the study suggests that working conditions in school in terms of manageable school demands and strong teacher and classmate support may benefit adolescents' positive health. The finding that the link between school demands and excellent self-rated health was more evident among girls than among boys may be interpreted in light of girls' on average stronger focus on schoolwork and academic success. The study contributes with to knowledge about how working conditions in school may impede or promote students' positive health.

Keywords
school demands, teacher support, classmate support, self-rated health, positive health, gender
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-191322 (URN)10.3390/ijerph18031310 (DOI)000615133700001 ()33535643 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-03-16 Created: 2021-03-16 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6606-2157

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