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Kraus, L., Loy, J. K., Olderbak, S., Trolldal, B., Ramstedt, M., Svensson, J. & Törrönen, J. (2024). Does the decline in Swedish adolescent drinking persist into early adulthood?. Addiction, 119(2), 259-267
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the decline in Swedish adolescent drinking persist into early adulthood?
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2024 (English)In: Addiction, ISSN 0965-2140, E-ISSN 1360-0443, Vol. 119, no 2, p. 259-267Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Sweden has experienced a substantial decrease in adolescent drinking over the past decades. Whether the reduction persists into early adulthood remains unclear. Using survey data, the present study aimed to determine whether reductions in indicators of alcohol use observed among adolescents remain in early adulthood and whether changes in alcohol intake are consistent among light/moderate and heavy drinkers.

Design: Data from the Swedish monthly Alcohol Monitoring Survey (2001–20) were used to construct five 5-year birth cohorts (1978–82, 1983–87, 1988–92, 1993–97 and 1998–2002).

Setting: Sweden.

Participants: A total of n = 52 847 respondents (48% females) aged 16 and 30 years were included in this study.

Measurements: For both males and females, temporal changes in the prevalence of any drinking, the prevalence of heavy episodic drinking (HED) and total alcohol intake in the past 30 days in centilitres were analysed.

Findings: The prevalence of any drinking in more recent cohorts remained low until young people came into their early (females) and mid- (males) 20s. Male cohorts differed in the prevalence of HED across age, with the later cohorts showing lower odds than earlier cohorts (odds ratios between 0.54 and 0.66). Among females, no systematic differences between cohorts across age could be observed. Later male birth cohorts in light/moderate drinkers had lower alcohol intake than earlier cohorts (correlation coefficients between −0.09 and −0.54). No statistically significant cohort effects were found for male heavy drinkers. Although differences in alcohol intake among females diminished as age increased, the cohorts did not differ systematically in their level of alcohol intake.

Conclusions: In Sweden, the reduced uptake of drinking in adolescents appears to fade as people move into adulthood. Observed reductions in alcohol intake among light and moderate drinkers appear to persist into adulthood. More recent male cohorts show a lower prevalence rate of heavy episodic drinking.

Keywords
Adolescents, alcohol intake, alcohol use, cohort, heavy episodic drinking, trends, youth drinking
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-222232 (URN)10.1111/add.16342 (DOI)001066322600001 ()37726931 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85171596329 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-11 Created: 2023-10-11 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Raninen, J., Ramstedt, M., Thor, S. & Törrönen, J. (2024). Mind the gap! Gender differences in alcohol consumption among Swedish ninth graders 1989–2021. Drug and Alcohol Review, 43(3), 596-603
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mind the gap! Gender differences in alcohol consumption among Swedish ninth graders 1989–2021
2024 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 596-603Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: To examine gender differences in drinking habits among Swedish ninth graders over the period 1989–2021.

Methods: Annual school surveys with nationally representative samples of ninth-grade students in Sweden covering the period 1989–2021, total sample of 180,538 students. Drinking habits were measured with self-reports of frequency and quantity of use and frequency of heavy episodic drinking. Differences between genders were compared annually and differences were tested using logistic and ordinary least square regression models with cluster robust standard errors.

Results: Small gender differences in the prevalence of alcohol use during the first part of the study period were followed by an increasing gap over the past decade with girls being more likely to drink alcohol than boys. Boys consumed larger amounts of alcohol than girls during the first three decades of the studied period but no gender differences were found in later years. Binge drinking was more prevalent among boys during 1989 to 2000 but no systematic gender difference was found during the past 15 years.

Discussion and Conclusions: There used to be clear gender differences in drinking habits among ninth graders in Sweden with boys drinking more than girls. This gap has narrowed over the past three decades and among contemporary adolescents, no gender differences are found neither in binge drinking nor volume of drinking and the prevalence of drinking is even higher among girls.

Keywords
alcohol, change, gender, Sweden, youth
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221384 (URN)10.1111/dar.13718 (DOI)001024743500001 ()37434384 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85164772835 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-20 Created: 2023-09-20 Last updated: 2024-04-22Bibliographically approved
Caluzzi, G., Fenton, L., Holmes, J., MacLean, S., Pennay, A., Fairbrother, H. & Törrönen, J. (2023). ‘90 per cent of the time when I have had a drink in my hand I’m on my phone as well’: A cross-national analysis of communications technologies and drinking practices among young people. New Media and Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘90 per cent of the time when I have had a drink in my hand I’m on my phone as well’: A cross-national analysis of communications technologies and drinking practices among young people
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2023 (English)In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Greater use of communication technologies among young people, including mobile phones, social media and communication apps, has coincided with declines in youth alcohol use in many high-income countries. However, little research has unpacked how drinking as a practice within interconnected routines and interactions may be changing alongside these technologies. Drawing on qualitative interviews about drinking with young people aged 16–23 across three similar studies in Australia, the United Kingdom and Sweden, we identify how communication technologies may afford reduced or increased drinking. They may reduce drinking by producing new online contexts, forms of intimacy and competing activities. They may increase drinking by re-organising drinking occasions, rituals and contexts. And they may increase or reduce drinking by enabling greater fluidity and interaction between diverse practices. These countervailing dynamics have likely contributed to shifting drinking patterns and practices for young people that may be obscured beneath the population-level decline in youth drinking.

Keywords
Affordances, alcohol, communications technology, practice theory, young people
National Category
Substance Abuse Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215147 (URN)10.1177/14614448221150775 (DOI)000919936300001 ()2-s2.0-85147433725 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-02 Created: 2023-03-02 Last updated: 2023-08-16
Törrönen, J. (2023). Analyzing agency and identity navigation in addiction stories by drawing on actor-network theory and narrative positioning analysis. Drugs: education prevention and policy, 30(1), 95-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analyzing agency and identity navigation in addiction stories by drawing on actor-network theory and narrative positioning analysis
2023 (English)In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 95-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In addiction stories in which dependence is experienced as an antagonistic force, agency manifests as enigmatic. As narrators in these stories usually describe how they lost their agency to a substance, we may ask who then acts. By drawing on the actor-network theory, I propose that addiction stories should be approached with an ontology that allows agency also to non-human actors and conceptualizes both human and non-human agencies as relational. Moreover, I argue that addiction stories perform complex identity navigation that can be captured by analysing them from the dimensions of ‘story,’ ‘interaction,’ and ‘identity claim’. As addiction stories describe what kinds of unique human and non-human elements and assemblages have contributed to the development of addiction, they provide expressive material to analyze how their narrators reassemble their addictive past (story), justify it to their audience (interaction) and articulate who they are (identity claim). By approaching addiction stories through these dimensions, we can produce knowledge on what kinds of identity alignments with particular human and non-human actors promote or hinder addiction as part of specific assemblages. This knowledge can help health practitioners focus their treatment interventions on the relational identities that act as barriers or facilitators of recovery. 

Keywords
Addiction stories, actor-network theory, assemblage, narrative positioning theory, self, story, interaction, identity claim
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202599 (URN)10.1080/09687637.2022.2035684 (DOI)000753800800001 ()2-s2.0-85125134334 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-10 Created: 2022-03-10 Last updated: 2023-02-22Bibliographically approved
Törrönen, J., Månsson, J., Samuelsson, E., Roumeliotis, F., Kraus, L. & Room, R. (2023). Following the changes in young people’s drinking practices before and during the pandemic with a qualitative longitudinal interview material. Journal of Youth Studies, 1-19
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Following the changes in young people’s drinking practices before and during the pandemic with a qualitative longitudinal interview material
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The paper analyses how the Covid-19 pandemic affected young people’s alcohol-related assemblages, trajectories of becoming and identity claims in Sweden. The data is based on longitudinal qualitative interviews among heavy and moderate drinking young people (n=23; age range 15–24 years). The participants were interviewed two to three times before the Covid-19 pandemic and once at the end of it, between 2017 and 2021. The analysis draws on actor-network theory and narrative positioning approach. The analysis demonstrates how the lockdown produced trajectories of becoming boring, normal, stress-free, self-caring, self-confident and shielded. In these trajectories, drinking was positioned into relations that either increased young people’s capacities for well-being or decreased them. Due to the lockdown, some participants learnt to be moved by relations that contributed to replace drinking with competing activities, while others experienced that the lockdown made drinking a more attractive activity, turning it into a collective force that helped them to overcome isolation. The results show how drinking is a heterogeneous activity which may increase or decrease young people’s capacities for well-being, depending on what kinds of assemblages and trajectories of becoming it is embedded in.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2023
Keywords
Covid-19, qualitative longitudinal data, actor-network theory, narrative positioning theory, trajectories of becoming, identity claims
National Category
Sociology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Sociology; Child and Youth Studies; Public Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224048 (URN)10.1080/13676261.2023.2283508 (DOI)001103715100001 ()2-s2.0-85177032512 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00313Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00457
Available from: 2023-11-27 Created: 2023-11-27 Last updated: 2023-12-19
Spångberg, J., Månsson, J., Törrönen, J. & Samuelsson, E. (2023). Making sense of gambling. Swedish youth navigating between risk and responsibility. International Gambling Studies, 23(1), 57-74
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making sense of gambling. Swedish youth navigating between risk and responsibility
2023 (English)In: International Gambling Studies, ISSN 1445-9795, E-ISSN 1479-4276, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 57-74Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Youth gambling is commonly described in policy and research as a high-risk behavior. To design relevant measures to prevent gambling problems among youth, it is important to understand how youth themselves relate to gambling. To explore how youth navigate their position on gambling in the context of their everyday lives, we conducted qualitative interviews with 35 participants aged 17–21 years in Sweden; 15 had gambled and 20 had experience of others’ gambling. The thematic analysis showed that both gamblers and non-gamblers overall had negative attitudes toward gambling and emphasized repeatedly discourses of personal responsibility in it. The participants used various neutralization techniques to navigate the economic and addictive risks of gambling. Youth who gambled distanced themselves from the risks of gambling by drawing a line between themselves and excessive gamblers, between safe and unsafe gambling, or highlighted how their skills and strategic thinking made gambling less problematic. Also, gambling in liminal circumstances abroad or in alcohol-serving venues offered a safe time and place for gambling by separating it from everyday life practices. The findings provide important cues to how young people locate gambling in their everyday life, which is useful knowledge for policy and prevention.

Keywords
Gambling, youth, risk, neutralizations, motives, Sweden, qualitative
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Public Health Sciences; Sociology; Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-206741 (URN)10.1080/14459795.2022.2077977 (DOI)000814123000001 ()2-s2.0-85132763624 (Scopus ID)
Projects
REGAPS
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-0709Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00457
Available from: 2022-06-23 Created: 2022-06-23 Last updated: 2023-06-09Bibliographically approved
Samuelsson, E., Törrönen, J., Månsson, J. & Roumeliotis, F. (2022). Becoming Safe, Legal, Mature, Moderate, and Self-Reflexive: Trajectories of Drinking and Abstinence among Young People. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(6), Article ID 3591.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Becoming Safe, Legal, Mature, Moderate, and Self-Reflexive: Trajectories of Drinking and Abstinence among Young People
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 6, article id 3591Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, a vast body of research has investigated trends of declining alcohol consumption among youths. However, the extent to which restrictive-youth approaches towards drinking are maintained into adulthood is unclear. The aim of this study is to explore how young people’s relation to alcohol changes over time. Our data are based on longitudinal qualitative in-depth interviews with 28 participants aged 15 to 23 conducted over the course of three years (2017–2019). The study draws on assemblage thinking by analysing to what kinds of heterogeneous elements young people’s drinking and abstinence are related and what kinds of transformations they undergo when they get older. Five trajectories were identified as influential. Alcohol was transformed from unsafe to safe assemblages, from illegal to legal drinking assemblages, from performance-orientated to enjoyment-orientated assemblages, and from immature to mature assemblages. These trajectories moved alcohol consumption towards moderate drinking. Moreover, abstinence was transformed from authoritarian assemblages into self-reflexive assemblages. Self-control, responsibility, and performance orientation were important mediators in all five trajectories. As the sober generation grows older, they will likely start to drink at more moderate levels than previous generations.

Keywords
youth, alcohol, abstinence, qualitative longitudinal data, actant, assemblage, trajectory, chains of translation
National Category
Sociology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202994 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19063591 (DOI)000775312400001 ()2-s2.0-85126477826 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Ungas hälsa
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-00313Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2020-00457
Available from: 2022-03-21 Created: 2022-03-21 Last updated: 2022-10-20Bibliographically approved
Månsson, J., Samuelsson, E. & Törrönen, J. (2022). Doing adulthood—doing alcohol: what happens when the ‘sober generation’ grows up?. Journal of Youth Studies (1), 84-99
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Doing adulthood—doing alcohol: what happens when the ‘sober generation’ grows up?
2022 (English)In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, no 1, p. 84-99Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Since the 2000s, there has been a worldwide trend of decreased alcohol consumption among young people. Although recent studies have given multiple explanations for this, we know little about the meaning of alcohol for this generation as they enter adulthood. The aim of this article is therefore to describe and analyze the age-related views toward alcohol among this group as they transition from adolescents to adults. The study was based on 39 qualitative interviews with people aged 17–21. Theoretical concepts such as doing age and symbolic boundaries were used to analyze the material and investigate how age can structure alcohol use, and how alcohol consumption can be narrated to produce maturity and adulthood. The analysis showed that participants presented their relation to alcohol in nuanced and responsible ways, signaling maturity. The participants’ navigation of acceptable alcohol consumption differs in terms of agency and control in different life phases. ‘Doing adulthood’ in relation to alcohol for abstainers and drinkers seems to center on the same understandings of legitimate behavior: being moderate, nuanced, and in control. This focus linked alcohol to the position these emerging adults hold in wider society, given that participants incorporated societal demands for a neoliberal lifestyle.

Keywords
alcohol, sober, emerging adulthood, qualitative, boundary work, doing age
National Category
Social Work Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Public Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-186621 (URN)10.1080/13676261.2020.1844173 (DOI)000588824100001 ()
Projects
Systembolagets Alkoholforskningsråd FO2018-0048Ungas hälsa
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016–00313
Available from: 2020-11-12 Created: 2020-11-12 Last updated: 2022-10-20Bibliographically approved
Autto, J., Törrönen, J. & Huysmans, J. (2022). Fear and insecurity in the politics of austerity. European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology, 9(1), 83-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fear and insecurity in the politics of austerity
2022 (English)In: European Journal of Cultural and Political Sociology, ISSN 2325-4823, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 83-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines how fear and insecurity are deployed in disputes over austerity. Drawing on discussions on the cultures of fear and on the social and political process which weaves fear and insecurity into the fabric of society, we analyse how austerity was justified and opposed in the Finnish parliament in 2015. We bring out different renditions of fear in five registers of justification that were deployed in the dispute. The registers evoked fear with threats to national sovereignty, dangers to societal security, and threats of harm and vulnerability. In addition, the registers evoked fear by drawing rhetorical force from the welfare state identity and by intertwining fear with political trust. Even though the renditions of fear played an important role, our findings also speak against straightforward interpretation of the politics of austerity as an example of moving into a culture of fear and insecurity. 

Keywords
Austerity, insecurity, politics of fear, trust, welfare state
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-209874 (URN)10.1080/23254823.2021.1888763 (DOI)2-s2.0-85101648809 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-27 Created: 2022-09-27 Last updated: 2022-09-27Bibliographically approved
Kraus, L., Seitz, N.-N., Loy, J. K., Trolldal, B. & Törrönen, J. (2022). Has beverage composition of alcohol consumption in Sweden changed over time? An age-period-cohort analysis. Drug and Alcohol Review, 41(1), 153-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Has beverage composition of alcohol consumption in Sweden changed over time? An age-period-cohort analysis
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2022 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 153-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction. In recent years, beverage composition of total alcohol consumption has changed substantially in Sweden. As beverage choice is strongly associated with drinking practices, our paper aims to analyse trends in beverage composition of alcohol consumption by age, period and cohort. Methods. Age-period-cohort (APC) analysis was conducted using monthly data from the Swedish Alcohol Monitoring Survey (2003-2018). The sample consisted of n = 260 633 respondents aged 16-80 years. APC analysis was conducted on drinkers only (n = 193 954; 96 211 males, 97 743 females). Beverage composition was defined as the beverage-specific proportion of total intake in litre ethanol. Fractional multinomial logit regression was applied to estimate the independent effects of age, period and cohort on trends in beverage composition. Results. Regression models revealed statistically significant effects of age on all beverages except for medium-strength beer and spirits in males. Controlling for age and cohort, decreasing trends were found over time for medium-strength beer and spirits. The proportion of regular beer increased statistically significantly in males and the proportion of wine in females, whereas the trends for the opposite sex remained stable in each case. Predictions for cohorts showed statistically significant decreasing trends for medium-strength beer in males, lower proportions for regular beer and higher proportions for spirits in the youngest cohorts. Discussion and Conclusions. The increasing proportion of wine drinking, which is associated with less risky drinking practices, may decrease alcohol-related morbidity and mortality. Increasing proportions of spirits in the youngest cohorts raises concerns of a possible revival in spirits consumption among the youngest.

Keywords
alcohol, beverage composition, trends, age-period-cohort analysis, survey
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-195195 (URN)10.1111/dar.13297 (DOI)000646641200001 ()33942409 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-08-10 Created: 2021-08-10 Last updated: 2022-01-20Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2473-6330

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