Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Piemontese, L., Castelli, G., Fetzer, I., Barron, J., Liniger, H., Harari, N., . . . Jaramillo, F. (2020). Estimating the global potential of water harvesting from successful case studies. Global Environmental Change, 63, Article ID 102121.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimating the global potential of water harvesting from successful case studies
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 63, article id 102121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water harvesting has been widely applied in different social-ecological contexts, proving to be a valuable approach to sustainable intensification of agriculture. Global estimates of the potential of water harvesting are generally based on purely biophysical assessments and mostly neglect the socioeconomic dimension of agriculture. This neglect becomes a critical factor for the feasibility and effectiveness of policy and funding efforts to mainstream this practice. This study uses archetype analysis to systematically identify social-ecological regions worldwide based on >160 successful cases of local water harvesting implementation. We delineate six archetypal regions which capture the specific social-ecological conditions of the case studies. The archetypes cover 19% of current global croplands with hotspots in large portions of East Africa and Southeast Asia. We estimate that the adoption of water harvesting in these cropland areas can increase crop production up to 60–100% in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania and India. The results of this study can complement conventional biophysical analysis on the potential of these practices and guide policy development at global and regional scales. The methodological approach can be also replicated at finer scales to guide the improvement of rainfed agricultural.

Keywords
Water harvesting, Archetype analysis, Sustainable agricultural intensification, Food security, Case studies
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-185717 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2020.102121 (DOI)000556563400030 ()
Available from: 2020-10-05 Created: 2020-10-05 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Ouedraogo, I., Barron, J., Tumbo, S. D. & Kahimba, F. C. (2016). Land Cover Transition in Northern Tanzania. Land Degradation and Development, 27(3), 682-692
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Land Cover Transition in Northern Tanzania
2016 (English)In: Land Degradation and Development, ISSN 1085-3278, E-ISSN 1099-145X, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 682-692Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Land conversion in sub-Saharan Africa has profound biophysical, ecological, political and social consequences for human well-being and ecosystem services. Understanding the process of land cover changes and transitions is essential for good ecosystem management policy that would lead to improved agricultural production, human well-being and ecosystems health. This study aimed to assess land cover transitions in a typical semi-arid degraded agro-ecosystems environment within the Pangani river basin in northern Tanzania. Three Landsat images spanning over 30years were used to detect random and systematic patterns of land cover transition in a landscape dominated by crop and livestock farming. Results revealed that current land cover transition is driven by a systematic process of change dominated by the following: (i) transition from degraded land to sparse bushland (108%); (ii) conversion from sparse bushland to dense bushland in lowland areas (60%); (iii) conversion from bushland to forest (48%); and (iv) conversion from dense bushland to cropland in the highlands (45%). Agricultural lands under water harvesting technology adoption show a high degree of persistence (60-80%) between time slices. This suggests that there is a trend in land-use change towards vegetation improvement in the catchment with a continuous increase in the adoption of water harvesting technologies for crop and livestock farming. This can be interpreted as a sign of agricultural intensification and vegetation regrowth in the catchment.

Keywords
agro-ecological transformation, water harvesting, land-use change, systematic transition, Tanzania
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Agricultural Science, Forestry and Fisheries
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-130190 (URN)10.1002/ldr.2461 (DOI)000373949600021 ()
Available from: 2016-05-10 Created: 2016-05-09 Last updated: 2022-02-16Bibliographically approved
Magombeyi, M. S., Taigbenu, A. E. & Barron, J. (2016). Rural food insecurity and poverty mappings and their linkage with water resources in the Limpopo River Basin. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 92, 20-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rural food insecurity and poverty mappings and their linkage with water resources in the Limpopo River Basin
2016 (English)In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, ISSN 1474-7065, E-ISSN 1873-5193, Vol. 92, p. 20-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mappings of poverty and food insecurity were carried out for the rural districts of the four riparian countries (Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe) of the Limpopo river basin using the results of national surveys that were conducted between 2003 and 2013. The analysis shows lower range of food insecure persons (0-40%) than poverty stricken persons (0-95%) that is attributable to enhanced government and non-government food safety networks in the basin countries, the dynamic and transitory nature of food insecurity which depends on the timings of the surveys in relation to harvests, markets and food prices, and the limited dimension of food insecurity in relation to poverty which tends to be a more structural and pervasive socio-economic condition. The usefulness of this study in influencing policies and strategies targeted at alleviating poverty and improving rural livelihoods lies with using food insecurity mappings to address short-term socio-economic conditions and poverty mappings to address more structural and long-term deprivations. Using the poverty line of $1.25/day per person (2008-2013) in the basin, Zimbabwe had the highest percentage of 68.7% of its rural population classified as poor, followed by Mozambique with 68.2%, South Africa with 56.1% and Botswana with 20%. While average poverty reduction of 6.4% was observed between 2003 and 2009 in Botswana, its population growth of 20.1% indicated no real poverty reduction. Similar observations are made about Mozambique and Zimbabwe where population growth outstripped poverty reductions. In contrast, both average poverty levels and population increased by 4.3% and 11%, respectively, in South Africa from 2007 to 2010. While areas of high food insecurity and poverty consistently coincide with low water availability, it does not indicate a simple cause-effect relationship between water, poverty and food insecurity. With limited water resources, rural folks in the basin require stronger institutions, increased investments and support to enable them generate sufficient income from their rain-fed farming livelihood to break out of the poverty cycle.

Keywords
Food insecurity, Poverty and water resources mappings, Agricultural water management, Rural smallholder farmers, Limpopo basin
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-135077 (URN)10.1016/j.pce.2015.10.020 (DOI)000383345100005 ()2-s2.0-84948823829 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-11-23 Created: 2016-10-31 Last updated: 2023-11-02Bibliographically approved
Ran, Y., Lannerstad, M., Barron, J., Fraval, S., Paul, B., Notenbaert, A., . . . Herrero, M. (2015). A review of environmental impact assessment frameworks for livestock production systems. Stockholm: Stockholm Environment Institute
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A review of environmental impact assessment frameworks for livestock production systems
Show others...
2015 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm Environment Institute, 2015. p. 49
Series
Stockholm Environment Institute, Project Report ; 2015-03
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-125079 (URN)
Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-07 Last updated: 2023-11-02Bibliographically approved
Karlberg, L., Garg, K. K., Barron, J. & Wani, S. P. (2015). Impacts of agricultural water interventions on farm income: An example from the Kothapally watershed, India. Agricultural Systems, 136, 30-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impacts of agricultural water interventions on farm income: An example from the Kothapally watershed, India
2015 (English)In: Agricultural Systems, ISSN 0308-521X, E-ISSN 1873-2267, Vol. 136, p. 30-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Agricultural water interventions (AWI), e.g. in-situ soil and water conservation strategies, irrigation, and damming of rivers to increase groundwater recharge, have been suggested as important strategies to improve yields in tropical agriculture. Although the biophysical implications of AWIs have been well investigated, the coupling between the biophysical changes and the economic implications thereof is less well understood. In this study we translate the results from a hydrological model, SWAT, on crop yields for different cropping systems with and without agricultural water interventions, to hypothetical farm incomes for a watershed, Kothapally, located in Andhra Pradesh, India. It was found that on average, AWI significantly improved farm incomes by enabling the cultivation of a high value crop during the monsoon season (cotton), supplementary irrigated to bridge dry spells and replacing a traditional crop (sorghum), and also by enhancing the capacity to produce dry season, fully irrigated vegetable crops, in this case exemplified by onion. AWI combined with cotton resulted in more than a doubling of farm incomes compared to traditional sorghum-based systems without AWI during normal and wet years (i.e. for 75% of the years). Interestingly, we observed that the difference between the AWI system and the no intervention system was larger during years of high average rainfall compared to dry years. It was also found that access to irrigation was more important for farm income than crop choice and AWI per se, and thus farms with access irrigation benefitted more from AWI compared to farmers lacking access to irrigation. In conclusion, we suggest that in order to assess equity aspects in terms of farm income generation following the implementation of an AWI project, there is a need for income analyses at the farm level, since income estimates at the watershed level may mask important differences in economic benefits between farms.

Keywords
Andhra Pradesh, Hydrological modelling, Cotton, Sorghum, Supplementary irrigation, Soil and water management
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-124612 (URN)10.1016/j.agsy.2015.02.002 (DOI)000354503000003 ()
Available from: 2016-01-02 Created: 2016-01-02 Last updated: 2022-02-18Bibliographically approved
Karpouzoglou, T. & Barron, J. (2014). A global and regional perspective of rainwater harvesting in sub-Saharan Africa's rainfed farming. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 72-75, 43-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A global and regional perspective of rainwater harvesting in sub-Saharan Africa's rainfed farming
2014 (English)In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, ISSN 1474-7065, E-ISSN 1873-5193, Vol. 72-75, p. 43-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In semi-arid and sub-humid sub-Saharan Africa highly variable rainfall, frequent droughts and low water productivity are consistently undermining food security. Rainwater harvesting technologies (RWHTs) help utilise water more productively whilst raising yield levels. In this article it is argued that realising the potential of RWHTs for resilience building and climate adaptation requires a better understanding of global and regional processes influencing RWHTs adoption combined with pre-existing analysis at the household scale. On the basis of a systematic literature review, processes of influence in the diffusion and uptake of RWHTs are identified. These relate to shifting ideology associated with food production systems; the scope of investments in agriculture science and technology; emergent actors shaping development assistance; and patterns of farmer mobility. Drawing insights from theory on transformations for sustainability and development, this article adds to the understanding of connectedness between farm-level adoption of RWHTs, and regional to global level actors, institutions and processes.

Keywords
Rainwater harvesting technologies, Transformation, Rainfed agriculture, Sub-Saharan Africa
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-114281 (URN)10.1016/j.pce.2014.09.009 (DOI)000348019800005 ()
Note

AuthorCount:2;

Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2022-02-16Bibliographically approved
Garg, K. K., Wani, S. P., Barron, J., Karlberg, L. & Rockström, J. (2014). Reply to comment on ‘Up-scaling potential impacts on water flows from agricultural water interventions: opportunities and trade‐offs in the Osman Sagar catchment, Musi sub‐basin, India’. Hydrological Processes 27: 3905–3921 by Bouma et al., 2014. Hydrological Processes, 28(8), 3352-3355
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reply to comment on ‘Up-scaling potential impacts on water flows from agricultural water interventions: opportunities and trade‐offs in the Osman Sagar catchment, Musi sub‐basin, India’. Hydrological Processes 27: 3905–3921 by Bouma et al., 2014
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Hydrological Processes, ISSN 0885-6087, E-ISSN 1099-1085, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 3352-3355Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-110869 (URN)10.1002/hyp.10176 (DOI)000333683100013 ()
Available from: 2014-12-18 Created: 2014-12-18 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Rockström, J., Falkenmark, M., Folke, C., Lannerstad, M., Barron, J., Enfors, E., . . . Pahl-Wostl, C. (2014). Water resilience for human prosperity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Water resilience for human prosperity
Show others...
2014 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The world's human population now constitutes the largest driving force of changes to the biosphere. Emerging water challenges require new ideas for governance and management of water resources in the context of rapid global change. This book presents a new approach to water resources, addressing global sustainability and focusing on socio-ecological resilience to changes. Topics covered include the risks of unexpected change, human impacts and dependence on global water, the prospects for feeding the world's population by 2050, and a pathway for the future. The book's innovative and integrated approach links green and blue freshwater with terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem functions and use. It also links changes arising from land-use alteration with the impacts of those changes on social-ecological systems and ecosystem services. This is an important, state-of-the-art resource for academic researchers and water resource professionals, and a key reference for graduate students studying water resource governance and management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. p. 292
Keywords
water, drinking water, water supply, history
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-106664 (URN)10.1017/CBO9781139162463 (DOI)9781107024199 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-08-14 Created: 2014-08-14 Last updated: 2022-10-03Bibliographically approved
Pert, P. L., Boelee, E., Jarvis, D. I., Coates, D., Bindraban, P., Barron, J., . . . Herrero, M. (2013). Challenges to Agroecosystem Management. In: E. Boelee (Ed.), Managing water and agroecosystems for food security: (pp. 42-52). Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges to Agroecosystem Management
Show others...
2013 (English)In: Managing water and agroecosystems for food security / [ed] E. Boelee, Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 2013, Vol. 10, p. 42-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

As growth in population, gross domestic product (GDP) and consumption continues, further demands are placed on land, water and other resources. The resulting degradation can threaten the food security of poor people in fragile environments, particularly those whose livelihoods rely largely on agricultural activities. The concept of diversified or multifunctional agroecosystems is a relatively recent response to the decline in the quality of the natural resource base. Today, the question of agricultural production has evolved from a purely technical issue to a more complex one characterized by social, cultural, political and economic dimensions. Multifunctional agroecosystems carry out a variety of ecosystem services, such as the regulation of soil and water quality, carbon sequestration, support for biodiversity and sociocultural services, as well as meeting consumers' needs for food. In turn, these systems also rely on ecosystem services provided by adjacent natural ecosystems, including pollination, biological pest control, maintenance of soil structure and fertility, nutrient cycling and hydrological services. However, poor management practices in agroecosystems can also be the source of numerous disservices, including loss of wildlife habitat, nutrient runoff, sedimentation of waterways, greenhouse gas emissions, and pesticide poisoning of humans and non-target species. This chapter discusses the challenges to agroecosystem management, and how adopting a diversified approach will enable farmers to farm longer and more sustainably in an environment of greater uncertainty, in the face of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 2013
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-105958 (URN)10.1079/9781780640884.0042 (DOI)000334353800006 ()978-1-78064-088-4 (ISBN)
Note

AuthorCount:8;

Available from: 2014-07-08 Created: 2014-07-08 Last updated: 2022-09-09Bibliographically approved
Barron, J., Tharme, R. E. & Herrero, M. (2013). Drivers and Challenges for Food Security. In: E. Boelee (Ed.), Managing water and agroecosystems for food security: (pp. 7-28). Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drivers and Challenges for Food Security
2013 (English)In: Managing water and agroecosystems for food security / [ed] E. Boelee, Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 2013, Vol. 10, p. 7-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

At the global scale, humanity is increasingly facing rapid changes, and sometimes shocks, that are affecting the security of our food systems and the agroecosystems that are the ultimate sources of food. To plan and prepare for resilient food production and food security in a sustainable and efficient way, we are challenged to better understand the conditions and likely responses of these diverse agroecosystems under various drivers of change and scenarios of future trends. Among the many direct drivers and indirect pressures that exist or are emerging, the discussion in this chapter focuses on the main themes of drivers of demographic changes, globalization of economic and governance systems (including markets), and climate change. The current state of health of water and land resources, and of ecosystems and their services, are considered alongside these drivers, as these are critical determinants of the pathways with sufficient potential to move food-producing systems towards more sustainable production. Hence, addressing the opportunities, synergies and constraints of multiple drivers will be critical for policy advice to build resilient food systems in the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wallingford: CABI Publishing, 2013
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-105956 (URN)10.1079/9781780640884.0007 (DOI)000334353800004 ()978-1-78064-088-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-07-08 Created: 2014-07-08 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3292-3438

Search in DiVA

Show all publications