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Publications (10 of 91) Show all publications
Bebbington, J., Blasiak, R., Larrinaga, C., Russell, S., Sobkowiak, M., Jouffray, J.-B. & Österblom, H. (2024). Shaping nature outcomes in corporate settings. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 379(1903), Article ID 20220325.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shaping nature outcomes in corporate settings
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2024 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 379, no 1903, article id 20220325Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Transnational companies have substantive impacts on nature: a hallmark of living in the Anthropocene. Understanding these impacts through company provision of information is a precursor to holding them accountable for nature outcomes. The effect of increasing disclosures (of varying quality) is predicated on 'information governance', an approach that uses disclosure requirements to drive company behaviour. However, its efficacy is not guaranteed. We argue that three conditions are required before disclosures have the possibility to shape nature outcomes, namely: (1) radical traceability that links company actions to outcomes in particular settings; (2) developing organizational routines, tools and approaches that translate strategic intent to on-the-ground behaviour; and (3) mobilizing and aligning financial actors with corporate nature ambitions. While disclosure is key to each of these conditions, its limits must be taken into account and it must be nested in governance approaches that shape action, not just reporting.This article is part of the theme issue 'Bringing nature into decision-making'.

Keywords
company decision-making, biodiversity accounting, information governance
National Category
Biomaterials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-229022 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2022.0325 (DOI)001206271200009 ()38643791 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-05-07 Created: 2024-05-07 Last updated: 2024-05-07Bibliographically approved
Søgaard Jørgensen, P., Jansen, R. E. V., Avila Ortega, D. I., Wang-Erlandsson, L., Donges, J., Österblom, H., . . . Crépin, A.-S. (2023). Evolution of the polycrisis: Anthropocene traps that challenge global sustainability. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 379(1893), Article ID 20220261.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of the polycrisis: Anthropocene traps that challenge global sustainability
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2023 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 379, no 1893, article id 20220261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Anthropocene is characterized by accelerating change and global challenges of increasing complexity. Inspired by what some have called a polycrisis, we explore whether the human trajectory of increasing complexity and influence on the Earth system could become a form of trap for humanity. Based on an adaptation of the evolutionary traps concept to a global human context, we present results from a participatory mapping. We identify 14 traps and categorize them as either global, technology or structural traps. An assessment reveals that 12 traps (86%) could be in an advanced phase of trapping with high risk of hard-to-reverse lock-ins and growing risks of negative impacts on human well-being. Ten traps (71%) currently see growing trends in their indicators. Revealing the systemic nature of the polycrisis, we assess that Anthropocene traps often interact reinforcingly (45% of pairwise interactions), and rarely in a dampening fashion (3%). We end by discussing capacities that will be important for navigating these systemic challenges in pursuit of global sustainability. Doing so, we introduce evolvability as a unifying concept for such research between the sustainability and evolutionary sciences.

Keywords
cultural evolution, social–ecological systems, participatory mapping, complex adaptive systems, evolutionary traps
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225226 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2022.0261 (DOI)37952617 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176728902 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Blasiak, R., Jouffray, J.-B., Norström, A. V., Queiroz, C., Wabnitz, C. C. C. & Österblom, H. (2023). The Ocean Decade as an instrument of peace. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 64, Article ID 101319.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Ocean Decade as an instrument of peace
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2023 (English)In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 64, article id 101319Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development 2021-2030 (the 'Ocean Decade') is poised to stimulate new cooperation for ocean science, but makes no mention of conflict or peace. We contend that this is a missed opportunity, and use an environmental peacebuilding typology to review how ocean science has historically contributed to peace. Such considerations are timely in the context of an increasingly complex and multidimensional ocean risk landscape, due among other things to unprecedented growth in the extent and intensity of ocean uses, and increasing conflict potential as the ocean becomes a more crowded and coveted place. We conclude by proposing the Ocean Decade Implementation Plan be appended to include an eighth intended outcome: 'A Peaceful Ocean'.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221122 (URN)10.1016/j.cosust.2023.101319 (DOI)001034912200001 ()2-s2.0-85165240414 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-19 Created: 2023-09-19 Last updated: 2023-09-19Bibliographically approved
Österblom, H., Gazitua, F. & Leible, A. (2023). To split a stone. Ecology & Society, 28(3), Article ID 11.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To split a stone
2023 (English)In: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 28, no 3, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Science and art are often disconnected but, if combined, can help stimulate learning and novelty and guide societal change. How then to bridge the divide between scientists and artists in a way that extends beyond superficial, short-term interactions? We describe an ongoing coproduction practice between a Swedish sustainability scientist and two Chilean artists-a sculptor and painter-striving to find ways to work together. Our transdisciplinary collaboration was initiated in 2013 and, although there has never been an agenda or goal for our interaction, there has been a mutual interest to investigate joint possibilities. Through a series of meetings, we tried but failed to accomplish anything for several years. By 2022, we finally created something tangible together, realizing it was not just material objects we were producing but also a meeting between worlds. We describe how this long-term partnership, driven by mutual respect and curiosity, created conditions for bridging across our respective knowledge and practices. By working, walking, and exploring together, we learned how to communicate, overcome challenges of different languages, and combine perspectives. We have recognized similarities in how we engage with material from the natural world and how we combine elements for novelty. Through our interactions, we have started to identify how coproduced science and art can stimulate a reconnection with the biosphere, thereby providing a foundation for transformative societal change.

Keywords
aleph, Anthropocene, arts research, biosphere, painting, resilience, sculpture, SARAS, transformation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221732 (URN)10.5751/ES-14270-280311 (DOI)001060915600001 ()2-s2.0-85170538809 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-28 Created: 2023-09-28 Last updated: 2023-09-28Bibliographically approved
Calderón-Contreras, R., Balvanera, P., Trimble, M., Langle-Flores, A., Jobbágy, E., Maass Moreno, M., . . . Velázquez, M. (2022). A regional PECS node built from place-based social-ecological sustainability research in Latin America and the Caribbean. Ecosystems and People, 18(1), 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A regional PECS node built from place-based social-ecological sustainability research in Latin America and the Caribbean
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2022 (English)In: Ecosystems and People, ISSN 2639-5908, E-ISSN 2639-5916, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainability requires a combination of meaningful co-production of locally relevant solutions, synthesis of insights gained across regions, and increased cooperation between science, policy and practice. The Programme for Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS) has been coordinating Place-Based Social-Ecological Sustainability Research (PBSESR) across the globe and emphasizes the need for regional scientific nodes from diverse biocultural regions to inform sustainability science and action. In this paper, we assess the strengths of the PBSESR communities in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC). We provide an overview of PBSESR literature associated with this region and highlight the achievements of two prominent regional networks: The Social-Ecological Systems and Sustainability Research Network from Mexico (SocioEcoS) and the South American Institute for Resilience and Sustainability Studies from Uruguay (SARAS Institute). Finally, we identify the potential in these nodes to constitute a regional PECS node in Latin America and discuss the capacity needed to ensure such function. The results of the literature review show that while still loosely interconnected across the region, networks play key roles in connecting otherwise cloistered teams and we illustrate how the SocioEcoS network (focusing on transdisciplinary co-production of knowledge towards sustainability) and the SARAS Institute (focusing on innovative approaches for looking at complex social-ecological problems, rooted in slow science and arts) operate as key connectors in the region. We conclude that these organizations combined can embody a Latin American node for PECS, and would thereby not only contribute to regional but also global capacities to advance the sustainability agenda. 

Keywords
Interdisciplinary research networks, network analysis, transdisciplinary collaboration, place-based research, social-ecological systems, sustainability
National Category
Other Social Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-204954 (URN)10.1080/26395916.2021.2000501 (DOI)000731565200001 ()2-s2.0-85121572701 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-23 Created: 2022-05-23 Last updated: 2022-12-07Bibliographically approved
Chambers, J. M., Wyborn, C., Klenk, N. L., Ryan, M., Serban, A., Bennett, N. J., . . . Rondeau, R. (2022). Co-productive agility and four collaborative pathways to sustainability transformations. Global Environmental Change, 72, Article ID 102422.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Co-productive agility and four collaborative pathways to sustainability transformations
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2022 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 72, article id 102422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Co-production, the collaborative weaving of research and practice by diverse societal actors, is argued to play an important role in sustainability transformations. Yet, there is still poor understanding of how to navigate the tensions that emerge in these processes. Through analyzing 32 initiatives worldwide that co-produced knowledge and action to foster sustainable social-ecological relations, we conceptualize 'co-productive agility' as an emergent feature vital for turning tensions into transformations. Co-productive agility refers to the willingness and ability of diverse actors to iteratively engage in reflexive dialogues to grow shared ideas and actions that would not have been possible from the outset. It relies on embedding knowledge production within processes of change to constantly recognize, reposition, and navigate tensions and opportunities. Co-productive agility opens up multiple pathways to transformation through: (1) elevating marginalized agendas in ways that maintain their integrity and broaden struggles for justice; (2) questioning dominant agendas by engaging with power in ways that challenge assumptions, (3) navigating conflicting agendas to actively transform interlinked paradigms, practices, and structures; (4) exploring diverse agendas to foster learning and mutual respect for a plurality of perspectives. We explore six process considerations that vary by these four pathways and provide a framework to enable agility in sustainability transformations. We argue that research and practice spend too much time closing down debate over different agendas for change - thereby avoiding, suppressing, or polarizing tensions, and call for more efforts to facilitate better interactions among different agendas.

Keywords
Co-production, Transformative processes, Social-ecological relations, Power relations
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-201326 (URN)10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2021.102422 (DOI)000738910700006 ()
Available from: 2022-01-27 Created: 2022-01-27 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Österblom, H. & Blasiak, R. (2022). Credibility at stake in Sweden. Science, 378(6618), 337-337
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Credibility at stake in Sweden
2022 (English)In: Science, ISSN 0036-8075, E-ISSN 1095-9203, Vol. 378, no 6618, p. 337-337Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Swedens legacy as a global leader in the push to put climate and the environment at the heart of government decision-making may have come to an end on 18 October 2022. The first casualty of the countrys new right-wing government was the Ministry of the Environment, eliminated on Day 1. A key question is the extent to which this change derails progress made toward building a sustainable nation and world.

Keywords
climate, climate change, government, Sweden
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-211820 (URN)10.1126/science.adf4127 (DOI)36302031 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85140862249 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-28 Created: 2022-11-28 Last updated: 2022-11-28Bibliographically approved
Selig, E. R., Nakayama, S., Wabnitz, C. C. C., Österblom, H., Spijkers, J., Miller, N. A., . . . Decker Sparks, J. L. (2022). Revealing global risks of labor abuse and illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing. Nature Communications, 13(1), Article ID 1612.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revealing global risks of labor abuse and illegal, unreported, and unregulated fishing
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2022 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Labor abuse on fishing vessels and illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing violate human rights, jeopardize food security, and deprive governments of revenues. We applied a multi-method approach, combining new empirical data with satellite information on fishing activities and vessel characteristics to map risks of labor abuse and IUU fishing, understand their relationships, and identify major drivers. Port risks were globally pervasive and often coupled, with 57% of assessed ports associated with labor abuse or IUU fishing. For trips ending in assessed ports, 82% were linked to labor abuse or IUU fishing risks. At-sea risk areas were primarily driven by fishing vessel flags linked to poor control of corruption by the flag state, high ownership by countries other than the flag state, and Chinese-flagged vessels. Transshipment risk areas were related to the gear type of fishing vessels engaged in potential transshipment and carrier vessel flags. Measures at port offer promise for mitigating risks, through the Port State Measures Agreement for IUU fishing, and ensuring sufficient vessel time at port to detect and respond to labor abuse. Our results highlight the need for coordinated action across actors to avoid risk displacement and make progress towards eliminating these socially, environmentally and economically unsustainable practices.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-204396 (URN)10.1038/s41467-022-28916-2 (DOI)000782237700031 ()35383162 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-05-06 Created: 2022-05-06 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Österblom, H., Folke, C., Rocha, J., Bebbington, J., Blasiak, R., Jouffray, J.-B., . . . Lubchenco, J. (2022). Scientific mobilization of keystone actors for biosphere stewardship. Scientific Reports, 12, Article ID 3802.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scientific mobilization of keystone actors for biosphere stewardship
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2022 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 12, article id 3802Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The biosphere crisis requires changes to existing business practices. We ask how corporations can become sustainability leaders, when constrained by multiple barriers to collaboration for biosphere stewardship. We describe how scientists motivated, inspired and engaged with ten of the world’s largest seafood companies, in a collaborative process aimed to enable science-based and systemic transformations (2015–2021). CEOs faced multiple industry crises in 2015 that incentivized novel approaches. New scientific insights, an invitation to collaborate, and a bold vision of transformative change towards ocean stewardship, created new opportunities and direction. Co-creation of solutions resulted in new knowledge and trust, a joint agenda for action, new capacities, international recognition, formalization of an organization, increased policy influence, time-bound goals, and convergence of corporate change. Independently funded scientists helped remove barriers to cooperation, provided means for reflection, and guided corporate strategies and actions toward ocean stewardship. By 2021, multiple individuals exercised leadership and the initiative had transitioned from preliminary and uncomfortable conversations, to a dynamic, operational organization, with capacity to perform global leadership in the seafood industry. Mobilizing transformational agency through learning, collaboration, and innovation represents a cultural evolution with potential to redirect and accelerate corporate action, to the benefit of business, people and the planet. 

National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-203512 (URN)10.1038/s41598-022-07023-8 (DOI)000764883800007 ()35246555 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125796589 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-04-04 Created: 2022-04-04 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Österblom, H., Bebbington, J., Blasiak, R., Sobkowiak, M. & Folke, C. (2022). Transnational Corporations, Biosphere Stewardship, and Sustainable Futures. Annual Review Environment and Resources, 47, 609-635
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transnational Corporations, Biosphere Stewardship, and Sustainable Futures
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2022 (English)In: Annual Review Environment and Resources, ISSN 1543-5938, E-ISSN 1545-2050, Vol. 47, p. 609-635Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Corporations are perceived as increasingly powerful and critically important to ensuring that irreversible climatological or ecological tipping points on Earth are not crossed. Environmental impacts of corporate activities include pollution of soils, freshwater and the ocean, depletion of ecosystems and species, unsustainable use of resources, changes to air quality, and alteration of the global climate. Negative social impacts include unacceptable working conditions, erosion of traditional practices, and increased inequalities. Multiple formal and informal mechanisms have been developed, and innovative examples of corporate biosphere stewardship have resulted in progress. However, the biosphere crisis underscores that such efforts have been insufficient and that transformative change is urgently needed. We provide suggestions for aligning corporate activities with the biosphere and argue that such corporate biosphere stewardship requires more ambitious approaches taken by corporations, combined with new and formalized public governance approaches by governments.

Keywords
accounting, corporations, governance, private sector, resilience, social-ecological
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-211654 (URN)10.1146/annurev-environ-120120-052845 (DOI)000869731800023 ()
Available from: 2022-11-24 Created: 2022-11-24 Last updated: 2022-11-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1913-5197

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