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Leineweber, ConstanzeORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8433-2405
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 134) Show all publications
Sousa-Ribeiro, M., Stengård, J., Leineweber, C. & Bernhard-Oettel, C. (2024). Are Trajectories of Preferred Retirement Ages Associated with Health, Work Ability and Effort–Reward Imbalance at Work? Findings from a 6-Year Swedish Longitudinal Study. Work, Aging and Retirement, 10(3), 225-240
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Trajectories of Preferred Retirement Ages Associated with Health, Work Ability and Effort–Reward Imbalance at Work? Findings from a 6-Year Swedish Longitudinal Study
2024 (English)In: Work, Aging and Retirement, ISSN 2054-4642, E-ISSN 2054-4650, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 225-240Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Preferred retirement age (PRA) is one key dimension when studying retirement decision-making. However, little is known concerning how PRA develops over the late career years. This study used a person-centered approach to longitudinally investigate trajectories of PRA and how they differ in self-rated health, perceived work ability, and effort–reward imbalance (ERI) at baseline levels and over 6 years. The study used data from four waves (2010, 2012, 2014, and 2016) of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. The sample consisted of 1,510 individuals aged 50–55 in 2010, who answered to the questionnaire for those in paid work (including self-employment) at the baseline and at least one of the following waves. Results from the latent class growth curve modeling show both within- and between-person variability in PRA over the 6-year span. We found four distinct trajectories, which differed both at the baseline levels and in the patterns of change in PRA: “C1: normative, relatively stable PRA” (42% of all participants); “C2: considerably early, increasing PRA” (6% of the participants); “C3: late, relatively stable PRA” (4% of the participants); and “C4: early, increasing PRA” (49% of the participants). Participants revealed a clear preference for retirement before the age of 65. Trajectories comprising earlier PRA showed poorer self-rated health, poorer work ability, and higher levels of ERI at the baseline and over time. The findings reinforce the importance of healthy work environments that promote work ability and facilitate a balance between efforts and rewards for encouraging longer working lives. 

Keywords
preferred retirement age trajectories, latent class growth curve modeling, work ability, health, effort-reward imbalance
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-216308 (URN)10.1093/workar/waad006 (DOI)000953626800001 ()
Note

This research was funded by a grant from FORTE: Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (grant number 2014-1662) to the first author. Data collection was funded by The Swedish Research Council (grant numbers 2009-06192, 2013-01645, 2013-01646, and 2015-06013) and the Stockholm Stress Center funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (grant number 2009-1758).

Available from: 2023-04-12 Created: 2023-04-12 Last updated: 2024-07-01Bibliographically approved
Bernhard-Oettel, C., Bergman, L. E., Leineweber, C. & Toivanen, S. (2024). Flourish, fight or flight: health in self-employment over time-associations with individual and business resources. International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, 97, 263-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flourish, fight or flight: health in self-employment over time-associations with individual and business resources
2024 (English)In: International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health, ISSN 0340-0131, E-ISSN 1432-1246, Vol. 97, p. 263-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Using COR theory to study developments of health and other key resources in self-employed workers in Sweden over 6 years, this study: (1) explored whether the heterogenous group of self-employed workers contained subgroups with different health trajectories, (2) investigated whether these were more typical for certain individuals (with respect to age, gender, sector, education, employment status), and (3) compared the different health trajectories regarding resource development in mental well-being, business resources, employment status, work ability. Method: The study used data from the Swedish longitudinal occupational survey of health (SLOSH) and included participants working as self-employed or combiner (N = 2642). Result: Five trajectories were identified with latent class growth curve model analysis (LCGM). Two health trajectories with (1) very good, respective (2) good stable health (together comprising 78.5% of the participants), (3) one with moderate stable health (14.8%), (4) one with a U-shaped form (1.9%), and (5) one with low, slightly increasing health (4.7%). The first two trajectories flourish: they maintained or increased in all key resources and were more likely to remain self-employed. Trajectories three and five consist of those who fight to maintain or increase their resources. Workers in the U-shaped health trajectory show signs of fight and flight after loss in health and other key resources. Conclusions: Studying subgroups with different resource developments over time was suitable to understand heterogeneity in self-employed workers. It also helped to identify vulnerable groups that may benefit from interventions to preserve their resources.

Keywords
self-employment, self-rated health, business success, longitudinal study, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-226544 (URN)10.1007/s00420-023-02041-z (DOI)001147729800001 ()38265496 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182980922 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was funded by FORTE, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare Grant Number 2017-01063. The APC was funded by Stockholm University. The SLOSH study was funded by the Swedish Research Council (VR 2009-06192, 2013-01645, 2013-01646, 2015-06013, and as part of the REWHARD consortium by 2017-00624), and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (2009-1758). Open access funding provided by Stockholm University.

Available from: 2024-02-14 Created: 2024-02-14 Last updated: 2024-04-24Bibliographically approved
Albrecht, S. C., Leineweber, C., Kecklund, G. & Tucker, P. (2024). Prospective effects of work-time control on overtime, work-life interference and exhaustion in female and male knowledge workers. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 52(2), 205-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospective effects of work-time control on overtime, work-life interference and exhaustion in female and male knowledge workers
2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 205-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Employee-based flexible working hours are increasing, particularly among knowledge workers. Research indicates that women and men use work–time control (WTC; control over time off and daily hours) differently: while men work longer paid hours, women use WTC to counteract work–life interference. In a knowledge-worker sample, we examined associations between WTC and overtime, work–life interference and exhaustion and tested whether gender moderates the mediating role of overtime. Methods: The sample contained 2248 Swedish knowledge workers. Employing hierarchical regression modelling, we examined effects of control over time off/daily hours on subsequent overtime hours, work–life interference and exhaustion in general and in gender-stratified samples. Using conditional process analysis, we tested moderated mediation models. Results: Control over time off was related to less work–life interference (βmen= −0.117; 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.237 to 0.003; βwomen= −0.253; 95% CI: −0.386 to −0.120) and lower exhaustion (βmen= −0.199; 95% CI: −0.347 to −0.051; βwomen= −0.271; 95% CI: −0.443 to −0.100). For control over daily hours, estimates were close to zero. While men worked more overtime (42 min/week), we could not confirm gender moderating the indirect effect of control over time off/daily hours on work–life interference/exhaustion via overtime. Independent of gender, effects of control over time off on work–life interference were partly explained by working fewer overtime hours. Conclusions: Control over time off was related to lower exhaustion and better work–life balance (in particular for women). We found no evidence for men’s work–life interference increasing with higher WTC owing to working more overtime. Knowledge workers’ control over time off may help prevent work–life interference and burnout.

Keywords
work-life balance, burnout, long working hours, flexible work, longitudinal
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215291 (URN)10.1177/14034948221150041 (DOI)000923893900001 ()36732910 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147497211 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (grant number 2013-0448) and NordForsk, the Nordic Programme on Health and Welfare (grant number 74809).

Available from: 2023-03-14 Created: 2023-03-14 Last updated: 2024-03-05Bibliographically approved
Plückelmann, C., Gustafsson Sendén, M., Bernhard-Oettel, C., Leineweber, C. & Sczesny, S. (2024). Women’s and men’s experiences with participative decision-making at workplace and organizational levels. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, Article ID 1240117.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women’s and men’s experiences with participative decision-making at workplace and organizational levels
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2024 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1240117Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The concept of participative decision-making (PDM) has been well established as a positive organizational factor, and has recently gained attention as a measure of gender inclusivity in the workplace. However, findings regarding gender differences in the experiences of PDM are inconclusive. This study hypothesized that women perceive themselves as less influential than men at the organizational level rather than at the workplace level. Furthermore, the study explored whether these assumed gender differences depend on the gender typicality of occupational positions and professions. We expected gender differences to be more pronounced for male-typed positions and professions (e.g., leadership, engineer) compared to non-male-typed occupational positions and professions (e.g., non-leadership, nurse).

Methods: Data on experiences with participative decision-making at the workplace and organizational levels were drawn from a large representative Swedish survey (N = 10,500; 60% women).

Results: Results showed that women experienced being less influential than men at the organizational level, whereas the experiences of women and men did not differ at the workplace level. The gender difference at the organizational level was not related to the gender typicality of position and profession.

Discussion: The findings highlight the importance of the inclusion of both women and men in strategic, large-scale decisions for achieving gender equality at work.

Keywords
participative decision-making, gender equality, leadership, gender stereotypes, gender roles
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Gender Studies
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-226264 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1240117 (DOI)001161209900001 ()2-s2.0-85184715169 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-05 Created: 2024-02-05 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Griep, Y., Magnusson Hanson, L., Leineweber, C. & Geurts, S. A. E. (2023). Feeling stressed and depressed?: A three-wave follow-up study of the beneficial effects of voluntary work. International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, 23(3), Article ID 100363.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feeling stressed and depressed?: A three-wave follow-up study of the beneficial effects of voluntary work
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Clinical and Health Psychology, ISSN 1697-2600, E-ISSN 2174-0852, Vol. 23, no 3, article id 100363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While symptoms of stress are a major risk factor in the onset of depressive symptoms and major depression, a better understanding of intervening mechanisms in breaking down this positive association is urgently required. It is within this literature that we investigate (1) how symptoms of stress are associated with depressive symptoms and the onset of major depression, and (2) the buffering effect of hours spent on voluntary work on the stress-depression relationship. Using 3-wave longitudinal data, we estimated a direct and reverse auto-regressive path model. We found both cross-sectional and longitudinal support for the positive association between symptoms of stress and depressive symptoms. Next, we found that individuals who experienced more symptoms of stress at T1, T2, and T3 were 1.64 (95%CI [1.46;1.91]), 1.49 (95%CI [1.24;1.74]), and 1.40 (95%CI [1.21;1.60]) times more likely to be prescribed an anti-depression treatment at T3, respectively. Moreover, we found that the number of hours spent volunteering mitigated the (1) longitudinal-but not cross-sectional-stress-depression relationship, and (2) cross-sectional but not the longitudinal-association between symptoms of stress at T3 and the likelihood of being prescribed an anti-depression treatment. These results point toward the pivotal role of voluntary work in reducing the development of depressive symptoms and major depression in relation to the experience of symptoms of stress.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
stress, depression, anti-depression treatment, volunteering, follow-up study
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-216356 (URN)10.1016/j.ijchp.2022.100363 (DOI)000949381300001 ()36605772 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85144572843 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-17 Created: 2023-04-17 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Peristera, P., Stengård, J., Eib, C., Bernhard-Oettel, C. & Leineweber, C. (2023). Organizational injustice and sickness absence: The moderating role of locked-in status. SSM - Population Health, 23, Article ID 101427.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizational injustice and sickness absence: The moderating role of locked-in status
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2023 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 23, article id 101427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Organizational injustice is known to negatively affect employees' health and to increase the risk for sickness absence. The negative health effects are also known to be more pronounced in uncontrollable, strain increasing, situations at the workplace. This study tests whether locked-in status, i.e., being stuck in a non-preferred workplace, modifies the associations between injustice perceptions and frequent (>= 2 times/yr) and long (>= 8 days/yr) sickness absence. The sample contained 2631 permanent employees from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health in 2018 and 2020. Multigroup structural equation modelling was used to compare the proposed relationships between employees who are locked-in in their workplace and employees who are not. We found a positive association between higher overall organizational injustice and long sickness absence two years later, with the association being stronger for the locked-in group. Also, higher injustice was associated with more frequent sickness absence, but only for those not being locked-in.

Employees being locked-in seem to have higher risk of long-term sickness absence which might indicate more serious health problems. Employees not being locked-in more often take short sickness absence, which could indicate a coping behaviour to handle high strain. This study adds knowledge to the role of locked-in status as a moderator in the much-studied relationship between organizational justice and health as well as to the multiple reasons underlying sickness absence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
organizational overall (in)justice, frequent and short sickness absence, duration of sickness absence, locked-in status, longitudinal SEM models
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220910 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2023.101427 (DOI)001055159400001 ()37215400 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159306608 (Scopus ID)
Note

The study was funded by Swedish Research Council for Health, Working life and Welfare (Forte, grant number 2017-0259) and utilised data from the REWHARD consortium supported by the Swedish Research Council (VR; grant number 2017-00624).

Available from: 2023-09-18 Created: 2023-09-18 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Stengård, J., Leineweber, C. & Wang, H.-X. (2023). Prolonging working life among blue-collar workers: The buffering effect of psychosocial job resources on the association between physically demanding and hazardous work and retirement timing. SSM - Population Health, 22, Article ID 101372.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prolonging working life among blue-collar workers: The buffering effect of psychosocial job resources on the association between physically demanding and hazardous work and retirement timing
2023 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 22, article id 101372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The need to delay retirement timing has been acknowledged in Western countries due to demographic ageing. The aim of the present study was to examine the buffering effects of job resources (decision authority, social support, work-time control, and rewards) on the association of exposures to physically demanding work tasks and physically hazardous work environment with non-disability retirement timing. Results from discrete-time event history analyses, in a sample of blue-collar workers (n = 1741; 2792 observations) from the nationwide longitudinal Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH), supported that decision authority and social support may buffer the negative impact of heavy physical demands on working longer (continuing working vs retiring). Stratified analyses by gender showed that the buffering effect of decision authority remained statistically significant for men, while that of social support remained statistically significant for women. Moreover, an age effect was displayed, such that a buffering effect of social support on the association of heavy physical demands and high physical hazards with working longer were found among older men (≥64 years), but not younger (59–63 years). The findings suggest that heavy physical demands should be reduced, however, when not feasible physical demands should be accompanied by social support at work for delaying retirement.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
retirement timing, physically demanding work tasks, physically hazardous work environment, job resources, moderator, interaction
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225010 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2023.101372 (DOI)2-s2.0-85149214471 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) under Grant 2019–01120. Data collection was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (FORTE) through the Stockholm Stress Center under Grant 2009–1758; the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare under Grant 2005–0734; and the Swedish Research Council (VR) under Grant 2009-06192, 2013–01645, 2015–06013, and 2017–00624.

Available from: 2024-01-04 Created: 2024-01-04 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, M., Gustafsson, K. & Leineweber, C. (2023). Psychosocial and organisational work factors as predictors of sickness absence among professionally active adults with common mental disorders. BMC Psychiatry, 23(1), Article ID 543.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychosocial and organisational work factors as predictors of sickness absence among professionally active adults with common mental disorders
2023 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 543Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The incidence of sickness absence (SA) due to common mental disorders (CMDs) has increased in recent decades. It is hence important to elucidate how individuals with CMDs can maintain work. The aim was to analyse the relationship between psychosocial and organisational workplace factors and a spell of > 14 days of SA among persons with CMDs. Methods: Included were respondents of the Swedish Work Environment Survey (SWES) 1993-2013, diagnosed with a CMD up to five years before the interview in the SWES (n = 3,795). Relative Risk (RR) regression models with 95% Confidence Intervals (CIs) analysed associations between psychosocial-, and organisational workplace factors and a subsequent spell of SA > 14 days. Results: Low control over work (RR:1.16; CI:1.01-1.35), job strain (RR:1.25; CI:1.04-1.49), no flexible working hours (RR:1.25; CI:1.08-1.45) or no possibility to work from home (RR:1.37; CI:1.13-1.66) were significantly related to an increased risk of SA. Persons diagnosed with depression experiencing job strain had the highest increased risk of SA (RR:1.55; CI: 1.07-2.25). Conclusions: A sustainable work-life among working individuals with CMDs can be provided by reducing job strain, and if possible, by increasing flexibility regarding workplace and working hours. This may prevent spells of SA, and hereby increase productivity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
sick leave, common mental disorder, CMD, psychosocial and organisational working conditions, ill health
National Category
Clinical Medicine Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221403 (URN)10.1186/s12888-023-05020-3 (DOI)001036780500001 ()37495944 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165631769 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access funding provided by Karolinska Institute. This work was funded by AFA Insurance Agency (AFA Försäkring), Sweden (grant number 200061).

Available from: 2023-09-20 Created: 2023-09-20 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Plückelmann, C., Gustafsson Sendén, M., Bernhard-Oettel, C., Leineweber, C. & Sczesny, S. (2023). Women´s and men´s experiences with participative decision making at workplace and organisational levels. In: : . Paper presented at 5th G-VERSITY European Training Network Workshop, Nijmegen , The Netherlands, 17-21 April, 2023..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Women´s and men´s experiences with participative decision making at workplace and organisational levels
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2023 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Participative decision-making (PDM) refers to the involvement of both employees and managers in decision-making processes, allowing them to provide input on work-related or organizational matters. Evaluating gender equality in decision-making power is important for organizations, as it impacts various work-related outcomes.This study examined gender differences in PDM in Swedish organizations. In this study, the focus was on direct PDM at the workplace and organizational levels.The study involved a large nationally representative survey in Sweden with 10,500 participants from different types of occupations. The results revealed that women perceived themselves to be less influential at the organizational level, while no gender differences were found at the individual workplace level.

Keywords
gender equality, participative decision making
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-219200 (URN)
Conference
5th G-VERSITY European Training Network Workshop, Nijmegen , The Netherlands, 17-21 April, 2023.
Available from: 2023-07-14 Created: 2023-07-14 Last updated: 2024-01-08Bibliographically approved
Edvall, N. K., Mehraei, G., Claeson, M., Lazar, A., Bulla, J., Leineweber, C., . . . Cederroth, C. R. (2022). Alterations in auditory brain stem response distinguish occasional and constant tinnitus. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 132(5), Article ID e155094.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alterations in auditory brain stem response distinguish occasional and constant tinnitus
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Investigation, ISSN 0021-9738, E-ISSN 1558-8238, Vol. 132, no 5, article id e155094Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND. The heterogeneity of tinnitus is thought to underlie the lack of objective diagnostic measures.

METHODS. Longitudinal data from 20,349 participants of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) cohort from 2008 to 2018 were used to understand the dynamics of transition between occasional and constant tinnitus. The second part of the study included electrophysiological data from 405 participants of the Swedish Tinnitus Outreach Project (STOP) cohort.

RESULTS. We determined that with increasing frequency of the occasional perception of self-reported tinnitus, the odds of reporting constant tinnitus after 2 years increases from 5.62 (95% CI, 4.83–6.55) for previous tinnitus (sometimes) to 29.74 (4.82–6.55) for previous tinnitus (often). When previous tinnitus was reported to be constant, the odds of reporting it as constant after 2 years rose to 603.02 (524.74–692.98), suggesting that once transitioned to constant tinnitus, the likelihood of tinnitus to persist was much greater. Auditory brain stem responses (ABRs) from subjects reporting nontinnitus (controls), occasional tinnitus, and constant tinnitus show that wave V latency increased in constant tinnitus when compared with occasional tinnitus or nontinnitus. The ABR from occasional tinnitus was indistinguishable from that of the nontinnitus controls.

CONCLUSIONS. Our results support the hypothesis that the transition from occasional to constant tinnitus is accompanied by neuronal changes in the midbrain leading to a persisting tinnitus, which is then less likely to remit.

Keywords
constant tinnitus, auditory brain stem response
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202931 (URN)10.1172/jci155094 (DOI)000765058800011 ()35077399 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125553918 (Scopus ID)
Note

This study was supported by the GENDER-Net Co-Plus Fund (GNP-182), the European Union’s Horizon 2020 grants no. 848261 (Unification of Treatments and Interventions for Tinnitus [UNITI]) and no. 722046 (European School for Interdisciplinary Tinnitus Research [ESIT]).

Available from: 2022-03-17 Created: 2022-03-17 Last updated: 2022-04-04Bibliographically approved
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