Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 179) Show all publications
Albrecht, S. C., Leineweber, C., Kecklund, G. & Tucker, P. (2024). Prospective effects of work-time control on overtime, work-life interference and exhaustion in female and male knowledge workers. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, 52(2), 205-215
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospective effects of work-time control on overtime, work-life interference and exhaustion in female and male knowledge workers
2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 205-215Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Employee-based flexible working hours are increasing, particularly among knowledge workers. Research indicates that women and men use work–time control (WTC; control over time off and daily hours) differently: while men work longer paid hours, women use WTC to counteract work–life interference. In a knowledge-worker sample, we examined associations between WTC and overtime, work–life interference and exhaustion and tested whether gender moderates the mediating role of overtime. Methods: The sample contained 2248 Swedish knowledge workers. Employing hierarchical regression modelling, we examined effects of control over time off/daily hours on subsequent overtime hours, work–life interference and exhaustion in general and in gender-stratified samples. Using conditional process analysis, we tested moderated mediation models. Results: Control over time off was related to less work–life interference (βmen= −0.117; 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.237 to 0.003; βwomen= −0.253; 95% CI: −0.386 to −0.120) and lower exhaustion (βmen= −0.199; 95% CI: −0.347 to −0.051; βwomen= −0.271; 95% CI: −0.443 to −0.100). For control over daily hours, estimates were close to zero. While men worked more overtime (42 min/week), we could not confirm gender moderating the indirect effect of control over time off/daily hours on work–life interference/exhaustion via overtime. Independent of gender, effects of control over time off on work–life interference were partly explained by working fewer overtime hours. Conclusions: Control over time off was related to lower exhaustion and better work–life balance (in particular for women). We found no evidence for men’s work–life interference increasing with higher WTC owing to working more overtime. Knowledge workers’ control over time off may help prevent work–life interference and burnout.

Keywords
work-life balance, burnout, long working hours, flexible work, longitudinal
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215291 (URN)10.1177/14034948221150041 (DOI)000923893900001 ()36732910 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147497211 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (grant number 2013-0448) and NordForsk, the Nordic Programme on Health and Welfare (grant number 74809).

Available from: 2023-03-14 Created: 2023-03-14 Last updated: 2024-03-05Bibliographically approved
Harma, M., Kecklund, G. & Tucker, P. (2024). Working hours and health - key research topics in the past and future. Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, 50(4), 233-243
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working hours and health - key research topics in the past and future
2024 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health, ISSN 0355-3140, E-ISSN 1795-990X, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 233-243Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This paper discusses the past and present highlights of working hours and health research and identifies key research needs for the future. Method: We analyzed over 220 original articles and reviews on working hours and health in the Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health published during the last 50 years. Key publications from other journals were also included. Results: The majority of identified articles focussed on the effects of shift and night work, with fewer studying long and reduced working hours and work time control. We observed a transition from small-scale experimental and intensive field studies to large-scale epidemiological studies utilizing precise exposure assessment, reflecting the recent emergence of register -based datasets and the development of analytic methods and alternative study designs for randomized controlled designs. The cumulative findings provide convincing evidence that shift work and long working hours, which are often associated with night work and insufficient recovery, increase the risk of poor sleep and fatigue, sickness absence, occupational injuries, and several chronic health conditions such as cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The observed risks are strongly modified by individual and work -related factors. Conclusions: Although the observed health risks of shift work and long working hours are mostly low or moderate, the widespread prevalence of exposure and the hazardousness of the many associated potential outcomes makes such working time arrangements major occupational health risks. Further research is needed to identify exposure-response associations, especially in relation to the chronic health effects, and to elucidate underlying pathways and effective personalized intervention strategies.

Keywords
health, long working hours, mechanism, research agenda, safety, shift work, study design
National Category
Health Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-227728 (URN)10.5271/sjweh.4157 (DOI)001186851200001 ()38497926 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-03-26 Created: 2024-03-26 Last updated: 2024-05-15Bibliographically approved
Johansson, P. J., Crowley, P., Axelsson, J., Franklin, K., Garde, A. H., Hettiarachchi, P., . . . Svartengren, M. (2023). Development and performance of a sleep estimation algorithm using a single accelerometer placed on the thigh: an evaluation against polysomnography. Journal of Sleep Research, 32(2), Article ID e13725.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and performance of a sleep estimation algorithm using a single accelerometer placed on the thigh: an evaluation against polysomnography
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 32, no 2, article id e13725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Accelerometers placed on the thigh provide accurate measures of daily physical activity types, postures and sedentary behaviours, over 24 h and across consecutive days. However, the ability to estimate sleep duration or quality from thigh-worn accelerometers is uncertain and has not been evaluated in comparison with the 'gold-standard' measurement of sleep polysomnography. This study aimed to develop an algorithm for sleep estimation using the raw data from a thigh-worn accelerometer and to evaluate it in comparison with polysomnography. The algorithm was developed and optimised on a dataset consisting of 23 single-night polysomnography recordings, collected in a laboratory, from 15 asymptomatic adults. This optimised algorithm was then applied to a separate evaluation dataset, in which, 71 adult males (mean [SD] age 57 [11] years, height 181 [6] cm, weight 82 [13] kg) wore ambulatory polysomnography equipment and a thigh-worn accelerometer, simultaneously, whilst sleeping at home. Compared with polysomnography, the algorithm had a sensitivity of 0.84 and a specificity of 0.55 when estimating sleep periods. Sleep intervals were underestimated by 21 min (130 min, Limits of Agreement Range [LoAR]). Total sleep time was underestimated by 32 min (233 min LoAR). Our results evaluate the performance of a new algorithm for estimating sleep and outline the limitations. Based on these results, we conclude that a single device can provide estimates of the sleep interval and total sleep time with sufficient accuracy for the measurement of daily physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and sleep, on a group level in free-living settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
actigraphy, activity tracker, wearables, physical activity, sedentary behaviour
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-210313 (URN)10.1111/jsr.13725 (DOI)000860314300001 ()36167935 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139070466 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was partly financed by grants from: the Swedish state under the agreement between the Swedish government and the county councils, the ALF-agreement (1040232); FORTE, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (2021–01561); The Danish Work Environment Research Fund (November 03 2017); National Health and Medical Research Council Investigator Grant, Leadership second level (APP1194510); British Heart Foundation, Special Grant (SP/F/20/150002); National Health and Medical Research Council Ideas Grant (APP1180812); Swedish Heart Lung Foundation (20160343); Funding from Stockholm Stress Center – a centre of excellence for research on work-related stress and health Stress Research; AFA-insurance (150159).

Available from: 2022-10-13 Created: 2022-10-13 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Petersen, H., Kecklund, G. & Åkerstedt, T. (2023). Disturbed sleep and its attribution to stress and other causes: A population-based survey. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 64(2), 99-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disturbed sleep and its attribution to stress and other causes: A population-based survey
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores the prevalence of attributed causes of disturbed sleep and the association between stress-disturbed sleep and age, sex, and sleep duration on weekdays as well as weekends in a representative sample. A nationally representative sample (n = 1,128, response rate 72.8%), stratified for sex and age, completed a computer-assisted phone survey that included questions about sleep disturbances and attributed causes. Stress was the main attributed cause of sleep disturbance (35.1%), most frequently attributed by younger women (χ2 = 26.5, p < 0.001). Prevalence of stress-disturbed sleep was higher with lower age (B = −0.05, odds ratio (OR) = 0.94, CI = 0.91, 0.98). There was a trend, however, toward a significant interaction between age and sex, with women in the older age-groups more frequently reporting stress-disturbed sleep than older men (B = −0.02, OR = 1.022, CI = 1.003, 1.042). Weekday sleep duration decreased with increased stress-disturbed sleep, with an inverse relationship on weekends except for those reporting stress-disturbed sleep more than 5 days per week (F = 10.5, p < 0.001), who also had the shortest weekend sleep duration. Sleep disturbances were commonly attributed to stress, and more strongly so in women younger than 46 years. Stress-disturbed sleep during weekdays seems to be potentially compensated for with extended sleep on weekends, except for those with continuous stress-disturbed sleep. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
sleep, stress, sleep disturbance, sleep duration, weekend, representative
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-209437 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12867 (DOI)000849525200001 ()36057792 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85137564216 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The Swedish agency for health technology assessment and assessment of social services, Swedish Research Council.

Available from: 2022-09-19 Created: 2022-09-19 Last updated: 2024-01-13Bibliographically approved
Stenfors, C. U. D., Stengård, J., Magnusson Hanson, L., Kecklund, G. & Westerlund, H. (2023). Green sleep: Immediate residential greenspace and access to larger green areas are associated with better sleep quality, in a longitudinal population-based cohort. Environmental Research, 234, Article ID 116085.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Green sleep: Immediate residential greenspace and access to larger green areas are associated with better sleep quality, in a longitudinal population-based cohort
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 234, article id 116085Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Sleep is pivotal to health, wellbeing and functioning in daily life, but sleep difficulties are common and may be affected by modifiable qualities in the residential surrounding environment, in terms of greenspace. However, population-based studies on individual-level greenspace and sleep are limited. The objective of the current study was thus to investigate prospective associations between fine-grained individual-level residential greenspace and sleep, and moderating effects of life style (physical activity, work status) and sex, in a nationwide population-based Swedish cohort.

Methods: Participants of the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH)-a population-based sample of adults in Sweden-were studied during 2014-2018 (19,375 individuals; 43,062 observations). Residential greenspace land cover, and coherent green area size, were assessed via high resolution geographic information systems, at 50, 100, 300, 500 and 1000 m buffers around residences. Prospective greenspace and sleep associations were assessed via multilevel general linear models, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic (individual and neighborhood), life style and urban factors.

Results: Higher greenspace availability in the immediate residential surroundings (50 m and 100 m buffer zones) was associated with less sleep difficulties, even after adjustment for confounders. Greenspace effects were generally greater among non-working individuals. Among the physically active, and among non-working, greenspace and green area size further away from home (300, 500 and 1000 m, i.e. dependent on mobility) were also associated with less sleep difficulties.

Conclusions: Residential greenspace in the immediate residential surroundings is associated with significantly less sleep difficulties. Greenspace further away from home was associated with better sleep especially among the physically active, and non-working individuals. The results highlight the importance of greenspace in the immediate residential-surrounding environment for sleep, and the need to integrate health and environmental policies, urban planning and greening.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
environmental policy, greenspace, population studies, public health policy, sleep, sustainable development
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Environmental Sciences; Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225131 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2023.116085 (DOI)37207733 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165470491 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was supported by research grants from the Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development, FORMAS (2018–00246), to CUDS. Data was partly utilized from the REWHARD research infrastructure, supported by the Swedish Research Council(2017–00624).

Available from: 2024-01-08 Created: 2024-01-08 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Schwarz, J. F. A., Freidle, M., van Leeuwen, W., Åkerstedt, T. & Kecklund, G. (2023). Sleep in everyday life – relationship to mood and performance in young and older adults: a study protocol. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, Article ID 1264881.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep in everyday life – relationship to mood and performance in young and older adults: a study protocol
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1264881Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Laboratory based sleep deprivation studies demonstrate that lack of sleep impairs well-being and performance ability, but suggest that these effects are mitigated in older adults. Yet, much less is known whether day-to-day variations of sleep have similar consequences in the context of everyday life. This project uses an intensive longitudinal design to investigate the occurrence of day-to-day variations in sleep and their impact on mood and performance in everyday life and to examine whether effects differ between young and older adults. We aim to include 160 young (18–30 years) and 160 older adults (55–75 years) to complete a 21-day experience sampling method (ESM) protocol. During the ESM period, participants are asked to fill in (i) a brief morning questionnaire, (ii) 8 short daytime questionnaires addressing momentary well-being, sleepiness, stress, and mind wandering, followed by a 1 min cognitive task and (iii) a brief evening questionnaire, all delivered via a mobile phone application. Sleep will be measured using self-reports (daily questions) and objectively with wrist actigraphy. The impact of adult age on mean levels and intraindividual variability of sleep will be analyzed using mixed-effects location scale models. The impact of sleep on daily cognitive performance will be analyzed using multilevel linear mixed models. The relationship of sleep to mean values and variability of positive and negative affect in young and older adults will be analyzed using mixed-effects location scale modeling. The overarching purpose of the project is improving the current knowledge on the occurrence of day-to-day variations in sleep and their relationship to performance as well as positive and negative affect in young and older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
sleep, mood, performance, experience sampling method (ESM), intensive longitudinal, age
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224267 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1264881 (DOI)001118947200001 ()2-s2.0-85178936186 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P19-0567:1
Note

Stockholm University Library funds the open access fee.

Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Xu, T., Rugulies, R., Vahtera, J., Stenholm, S., Pentti, J., Magnusson Hanson, L., . . . Rod, N. H. (2023). Workplace Psychosocial Resources and Risk of Sleep Disturbances Among Employees. JAMA Network Open, 6(5), Article ID e2312514.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workplace Psychosocial Resources and Risk of Sleep Disturbances Among Employees
Show others...
2023 (English)In: JAMA Network Open, E-ISSN 2574-3805, Vol. 6, no 5, article id e2312514Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Importance: Workplace psychosocial resources naturally tend to cluster in some work teams. To inform work-related sleep health promotion interventions, it is important to determine the associations between clustering of workplace resources and sleep disturbances when some resources are high while others are low and to mimic an actual intervention using observational data.

Objective: To examine whether clustering of and changes in workplace psychosocial resources are associated with sleep disturbances among workers.

Design, Setting, and Participants: This population-based cohort study used data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (2012-2018), the Work Environment and Health in Denmark study (2012-2018), and the Finnish Public Sector Study (2008-2014), collected biennially. Statistical analysis was conducted from November 2020 to June 2022.

Exposure: Questionnaires were distributed measuring leadership quality and procedural justice (ie, vertical resources) as well as collaboration culture and coworker support (ie, horizontal resources). Resources were divided into clusters of general low, intermediate vertical and low horizontal, low vertical and high horizontal, intermediate vertical and high horizontal, and general high.

Main Outcomes and Measures: Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs were reported from logistic regression models for the associations between the clustering of resources and concurrent and long-term sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbances were measured by self-administered questionnaires.

Results: The study identified 114 971 participants with 219 982 participant-observations (151 021 [69%] women; mean [SD] age, 48 [10] years). Compared with participants with general low resources, other groups showed a lower prevalence of sleep disturbances, with the lowest observed in the general high group concurrently (OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.37-0.40) and longitudinally after 6 years (OR, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.48-0.57). Approximately half of the participants (27 167 participants [53%]) experienced changes in resource clusters within 2 years. Improvements in vertical or horizontal dimensions were associated with reduced odds of persistent sleep disturbances, and the lowest odds of sleep disturbances was found in the group with improvements in both vertical and horizontal dimensions (OR, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.46-0.62). A corresponding dose-response association with sleep disturbances was observed for decline in resources (eg, decline in both dimensions: OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.54-1.97).

Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of workplace psychosocial resources and sleep disturbances, clustering of favorable resources was associated with a lower risk of sleep disturbances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association (AMA), 2023
Keywords
workplace psychosocial resources, sleep disturbances, employees, population-based cohort study
National Category
Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225050 (URN)10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2023.12514 (DOI)37159197 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159729417 (Scopus ID)
Note

This project was supported by the Danish Working Environment Foundation (grant No. 13-2015-09; Dr Rod). Dr Xu was supported by a grant from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (grant No. 2020-00040). Dr Kivimäki was support by the Academy of Finland (grant No. 329202 and 350426) and Finnish Work Environment Fund (grant No. 190424). Dr Magnusson Hanson was supported by a grant from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (grant No. 2019-01318). Dr Vahtera was supported by the Academy of Finland (grant No. 321409 and 329240).

Available from: 2024-01-05 Created: 2024-01-05 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Deter, H.-C., Meister, R., Leineweber, C., Kecklund, G., Lohse, L., Orth-Gomér, K. & Fem-Cor-Risk Study group, . (2022). Behavioral factors predict all-cause mortality in female coronary patients and healthy controls over 26 years – a prospective secondary analysis of the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Study. PLOS ONE, 17(12), Article ID e0277028.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral factors predict all-cause mortality in female coronary patients and healthy controls over 26 years – a prospective secondary analysis of the Stockholm Female Coronary Risk Study
Show others...
2022 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 12, article id e0277028Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

The prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) is related to its severity and cardiovascular risk factors in both sexes. In women, social isolation, marital stress, sedentary lifestyle and depression predicted CAD progression and outcome within 3 to 5 years. We hypothesised that these behavioral factors would still be associated with all-cause mortality in female patients after 26 years.

Methods

We examined 292 patients with CAD and 300 healthy controls (mean age of 56 ± 7 y) within the Fem-Cor-Risk-Study at baseline. Their cardiac, behavioral, and psychosocial risk profiles, exercise, smoking, and dietary habits were assessed using standardized procedures. Physiological characteristics included a full lipid profile, the coagulation cascade and autonomic dysfunction (heart rate variability, HRV). A new exploratory analysis using machine-learning algorithms compared the effects of social and behavioral mechanisms with standard risk factors. Results: All-cause mortality records were completed in 286 (97.9%) patients and 299 (99.7%) healthy women. During a median follow-up of 26 years, 158 (55.2%) patients and 101 (33.9%) matched healthy controls died. The annualized mortality rate was 2.1% and 1.3%, respectively. After controlling for all available confounders, behavioral predictors of survival in patients were social integration (HR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99–1.0) and physical activity (HR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37–0.79). Smoking acted as a predictor of all-cause mortality (HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.03–2.36). Among healthy women, moderate physical activity (HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.24–0.74) and complete HRV recordings (≥50%) were found to be significant predictors of survival.

Conclusions

CAD patients with adequate social integration, who do not smoke and are physically active, have a favorable long-term prognosis. The exact survival times confirm that behavioral risk factors are associated with all-cause mortality in female CAD patients and healthy controls.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215180 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0277028 (DOI)000925063300015 ()36477657 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143561541 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-01 Created: 2023-03-01 Last updated: 2023-05-02Bibliographically approved
Rocha, F. P., Marqueze, E. C., Kecklund, G. & de Castro Moreno, C. R. (2022). Evaluation of truck driver rest locations and sleep quality. Sleep Science, 15(1), 55-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of truck driver rest locations and sleep quality
2022 (English)In: Sleep Science, ISSN 1984-0659, E-ISSN 1984-0063, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Truck drivers’ work organization requires that rest and sleep be taken in various locations, where sleep quality might be affected by the discomfort of these environments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate truck drivers’ rest locations and their association with sleep quality utilizing an ergonomic approach. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sleep quality of 81 truck drivers was assessed using the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). An adapted version of the ergonomics workplace analysis (EWA) instrument was used to evaluate 44 rest locations. RESULTS: Half of the workers preferred sleeper berths (51.2%) as a rest place. Sleep was classified as poor by 71.6% of the drivers. Dorms were rated more positively (p<0.001) by truck drivers (2.0±1.1) than by the analyst (2.6±0.6). Sleeper berths and dorms were rated statistically different by truck drivers (p=0.002), as well as by the analyst (p=0.003). No correlation was found between EWA evaluations and total score for sleep quality. Separate analyses of dorms and truck berths showed very few correlations. The higher the noise of roommates in dorms, the worse the sleep quality. Conversely, noise in corridors or outside the room positively impacted sleep quality. CONCLUSION: Noise in the rest place may affect sleep in both directions, negatively or positively. Sleep was classified as poor regardless of resting place. The quality of resting places seemed to have little effect on sleep quality of truck drivers. Factors other than rest place, such as work scheduling, are probably more important for promoting good sleep quality.

Keywords
sleep, resting places, truck drivers, public health
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-205104 (URN)10.5935/1984-0063.20210028 (DOI)000797563100008 ()
Available from: 2022-06-02 Created: 2022-06-02 Last updated: 2023-01-04Bibliographically approved
Garefelt, J., Gershagen, S., Kecklund, G., Westerlund, H. & Platts, L. G. (2022). How does work impact daily sleep quality? A within-individual study using actigraphy and self-reports over the retirement transition. Journal of Sleep Research, 31(3), Article ID e13513.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How does work impact daily sleep quality? A within-individual study using actigraphy and self-reports over the retirement transition
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 31, no 3, article id e13513Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined how the cessation of work at retirement affects daily measures of actigraphy-measured and self-rated sleep quality. Time in bed or asleep and stress at bedtime were examined as potential mechanisms. In total 117 employed participants who were aged 60-72 years and planned to retire soon were recruited to the Swedish Retirement Study. Sleep quality was measured in a baseline week using accelerometers, diaries, and questionnaires. Subjective sleep measures were sleep quality, restless sleep, restorative sleep, getting enough sleep, estimated wake after sleep onset, difficulties falling asleep, too early final awakening, and difficulties waking up. Actigraphy measures were sleep efficiency, wake after sleep onset, and average awakening length. After 1 and 2 years, the measurements were repeated for the now retired participants. Daily variations in sleep quality before and after retirement were analysed using multilevel modelling, with time in bed or asleep and stress at bedtime as potential mediators. We found that several self-reports of sleep improved (e.g., +0.2 standard deviations for sleep quality and +0.5 standard deviations for restorative sleep) while objective sleep quality remained unchanged or decreased slightly with retirement (e.g., -0.8% for sleep efficiency). Increased time in bed or asleep and stress at bedtime accounted partially for the improvements in self-rated sleep quality at retirement. In conclusion, actigraph-measured and self-reported sleep quality do not change in concert at retirement, highlighting the interest of studying both outcomes. The main effects of retirement from work concern subjective experiences of recovery more than sleep quality per se.

Keywords
job, perseverative cognition, sleep duration, sleep initiating and maintenance disorders, sleep problems, stress
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200126 (URN)10.1111/jsr.13513 (DOI)000714275200001 ()34734447 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118512356 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-28 Created: 2021-12-28 Last updated: 2022-09-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7457-7302

Search in DiVA

Show all publications