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Publications (10 of 21) Show all publications
Steffen, K., Proux-Wéra, E., Soler, L., Churcher, A., Sundh, J. & Cárdenas, P. (2023). Whole genome sequence of the deep-sea sponge Geodia barretti (Metazoa, Porifera, Demospongiae) . G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, 13(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whole genome sequence of the deep-sea sponge Geodia barretti (Metazoa, Porifera, Demospongiae) 
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2023 (English)In: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, E-ISSN 2160-1836, Vol. 13, no 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sponges are among the earliest branching extant animals. As such, genetic data from this group are valuable for understanding the evolution of various traits and processes in other animals. However, like many marine organisms, they are notoriously difficult to sequence, and hence, genomic data are scarce. Here, we present the draft genome assembly for the North Atlantic deep-sea high microbial abundance species Geodia barretti, from a single individual collected on the West Coast of Sweden. The nuclear genome assembly has 4,535 scaffolds, an N50 of 48,447 bp and a total length of 144 Mb; the mitochondrial genome is 17,996 bp long. BUSCO completeness was 71.5%. The genome was annotated using a combination of ab initio and evidence-based methods finding 31,884 protein-coding genes. 

Keywords
Geodia barretti, Porifera, Tetractinellida, Sweden, symbionts, metagenome-assembled genome
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220969 (URN)10.1093/g3journal/jkad192 (DOI)001058715700001 ()37619978 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174513308 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Law, S. R., Serrano, A. R., Daguerre, Y., Sundh, J., Schneider, A. N., Stangl, Z. R., . . . Hurry, V. (2022). Metatranscriptomics captures dynamic shifts in mycorrhizal coordination in boreal forests. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 119(26), Article ID e2118852119.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Metatranscriptomics captures dynamic shifts in mycorrhizal coordination in boreal forests
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2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 119, no 26, article id e2118852119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon storage and cycling in boreal forests—the largest terrestrial carbon store—is moderated by complex interactions between trees and soil microorganisms. However, existing methods limit our ability to predict how changes in environmental conditions will alter these associations and the essential ecosystem services they provide. To address this, we developed a metatranscriptomic approach to analyze the impact of nutrient enrichment on Norway spruce fine roots and the community structure, function, and tree–microbe coordination of over 350 root-associated fungal species. In response to altered nutrient status, host trees redefined their relationship with the fungal community by reducing sugar efflux carriers and enhancing defense processes. This resulted in a profound restructuring of the fungal community and a collapse in functional coordination between the tree and the dominant Basidiomycete species, and an increase in functional coordination with versatile Ascomycete species. As such, there was a functional shift in community dominance from Basidiomycetes species, with important roles in enzymatically cycling recalcitrant carbon, to Ascomycete species that have melanized cell walls that are highly resistant to degradation. These changes were accompanied by prominent shifts in transcriptional coordination between over 60 predicted fungal effectors, with more than 5,000 Norway spruce transcripts, providing mechanistic insight into the complex molecular dialogue coordinating host trees and their fungal partners. The host–microbe dynamics captured by this study functionally inform how these complex and sensitive biological relationships may mediate the carbon storage potential of boreal soils under changing nutrient conditions. 

Keywords
carbon storage, ectomycorrhiza, fungal effectors, host–microbe, metatranscriptome, transcriptome, carbon, Article, Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes, carbon cycling, community structure, controlled study, environmental impact, eutrophication, fungal cell wall, fungal community, metatranscriptomics, molecular dynamics, mycorrhiza, nonhuman, Norway, plant gene, plant root, prediction, spruce, taiga, chemistry, ecosystem, forest, metabolism, microbiology, physiology, soil, tree, Basidiomycota, Forests, Mycorrhizae, Picea, Soil Microbiology, Trees
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-212130 (URN)10.1073/pnas.2118852119 (DOI)35727987 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85132270803 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-01 Created: 2022-12-01 Last updated: 2022-12-01Bibliographically approved
Schneider, A. N., Sundh, J., Sundström, G., Richau, K., Delhomme, N., Grabherr, M., . . . Street, N. R. (2021). Comparative Fungal Community Analyses Using Metatranscriptomics and Internal Transcribed Spacer Amplicon Sequencing from Norway Spruce. mSystems, 6(1), Article ID e00884-20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative Fungal Community Analyses Using Metatranscriptomics and Internal Transcribed Spacer Amplicon Sequencing from Norway Spruce
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2021 (English)In: mSystems, E-ISSN 2379-5077, Vol. 6, no 1, article id e00884-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The health, growth, and fitness of boreal forest trees are impacted and improved by their associated microbiomes. Microbial gene expression and functional activity can be assayed with RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data from host samples. In contrast, phylogenetic marker gene amplicon sequencing data are used to assess taxonomic composition and community structure of the microbiome. Few studies have considered how much of this structural and taxonomic information is included in transcriptomic data from matched samples. Here, we described fungal communities using both host-derived RNA-Seq and fungal ITS1 DNA amplicon sequencing to compare the outcomes between the methods. We used a panel of root and needle samples from the coniferous tree species Picea abies (Norway spruce) growing in untreated (nutrient-deficient) and nutrient-enriched plots at the Flakaliden forest research site in boreal northern Sweden. We show that the relationship between samples and alpha and beta diversity indicated by the fungal transcriptome is in agreement with that generated by the ITS data, while also identifying a lack of taxonomic overlap due to limitations imposed by current database coverage. Furthermore, we demonstrate how metatranscriptomics data additionally provide biologically informative functional insights. At the community level, there were changes in starch and sucrose metabolism, biosynthesis of amino acids, and pentose and glucuronate interconversions, while processing of organic macromolecules, including aromatic and heterocyclic compounds, was enriched in transcripts assigned to the genus Cortinarius.

IMPORTANCE A deeper understanding of microbial communities associated with plants is revealing their importance for plant health and productivity. RNA extracted from plant field samples represents the host and other organisms present. Typically, gene expression studies focus on the plant component or, in a limited number of studies, expression in one or more associated organisms. However, metatranscriptomic data are rarely used for taxonomic profiling, which is currently performed using amplicon approaches. We created an assembly-based, reproducible, and hardware-agnostic workflow to taxonomically and functionally annotate fungal RNA-Seq data obtained from Norway spruce roots, which we compared to matching ITS amplicon sequencing data. While we identified some limitations and caveats, we show that functional, taxonomic, and compositional insights can all be obtained from RNA-Seq data. These findings highlight the potential of metatranscriptomics to advance our understanding of interaction, response, and effect between host plants and their associated microbial communities.

Keywords
fungi, metatranscriptomics, ITS amplicon sequencing, Norway spruce, nutrient enrichment, ectomycorrhiza, tree roots, phyllosphere, fungi, phyllosphere-inhabiting microbes
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-194573 (URN)10.1128/mSystems.00884-20 (DOI)000647691000034 ()33594001 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-07-30 Created: 2021-07-30 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Hagström, Å., Zweifel, U. L., Sundh, J., Osbeck, C. M. G., Bunse, C., Sjöstedt, J., . . . Pinhassi, J. (2021). Composition and Seasonality of Membrane Transporters in Marine Picoplankton. Frontiers in Microbiology, 12, Article ID 714732.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Composition and Seasonality of Membrane Transporters in Marine Picoplankton
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2021 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 12, article id 714732Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we examined transporter genes in metagenomic and metatranscriptomic data from a time-series survey in the temperate marine environment of the Baltic Sea. We analyzed the abundance and taxonomic distribution of transporters in the 3μm–0.2μm size fraction comprising prokaryotes and some picoeukaryotes. The presence of specific transporter traits was shown to be guiding the succession of these microorganisms. A limited number of taxa were associated with the dominant transporter proteins that were identified for the nine key substrate categories for microbial growth. Throughout the year, the microbial taxa at the level of order showed highly similar patterns in terms of transporter traits. The distribution of transporters stayed the same, irrespective of the abundance of each taxon. This would suggest that the distribution pattern of transporters depends on the bacterial groups being dominant at a given time of the year. Also, we find notable numbers of secretion proteins that may allow marine bacteria to infect and kill prey organisms thus releasing nutrients. Finally, we demonstrate that transporter proteins may provide clues to the relative importance of biogeochemical processes, and we suggest that virtual transporter functionalities may become important components in future population dynamics models.

Keywords
bacterial succession, membrane transporter traits, substrate uptake, toxin secretion, biogeochemical indicator
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-198844 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2021.714732 (DOI)000706488800001 ()34650527 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-11-25 Created: 2021-11-25 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Mehrshad, M., Lopez-Fernandez, M., Sundh, J., Bell, E., Simone, D., Buck, M., . . . Dopson, M. (2021). Energy efficiency and biological interactions define the core microbiome of deep oligotrophic groundwater. Nature Communications, 12(1), Article ID 4253.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy efficiency and biological interactions define the core microbiome of deep oligotrophic groundwater
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2021 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 4253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While oligotrophic deep groundwaters host active microbes attuned to the low-end of the bioenergetics spectrum, the ecological constraints on microbial niches in these ecosystems and their consequences for microbiome convergence are unknown. Here, we provide a genome-resolved, integrated omics analysis comparing archaeal and bacterial communities in disconnected fracture fluids of the Fennoscandian Shield in Europe. Leveraging a dataset that combines metagenomes, single cell genomes, and metatranscriptomes, we show that groundwaters flowing in similar lithologies offer fixed niches that are occupied by a common core microbiome. Functional expression analysis highlights that these deep groundwater ecosystems foster diverse, yet cooperative communities adapted to this setting. We suggest that these communities stimulate cooperation by expression of functions related to ecological traits, such as aggregate or biofilm formation, while alleviating the burden on microorganisms producing compounds or functions that provide a collective benefit by facilitating reciprocal promiscuous metabolic partnerships with other members of the community. We hypothesize that an episodic lifestyle enabled by reversible bacteriostatic functions ensures the subsistence of the oligotrophic deep groundwater microbiome. Ecological constraints on microbial niches in oligotrophic deep groundwaters remain elusive. This study provides support for the existence of a common core microbiome in two deep groundwater biomes of the Fennoscandian Shield using a genome-resolved, integrated omics analysis.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-197214 (URN)10.1038/s41467-021-24549-z (DOI)000675329200009 ()34253732 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-09-29 Created: 2021-09-29 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, H., Hugerth, L. W., Sundh, J., Lundin, E. & Andersson, A. F. (2020). Genome sequence of segmented filamentous bacteria present in the human intestine. Communications biology, 3(1), Article ID 485.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome sequence of segmented filamentous bacteria present in the human intestine
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2020 (English)In: Communications biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 485Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are unique immune modulatory bacteria colonizing the small intestine of a variety of animals in a host-specific manner. SFB exhibit filamentous growth and attach to the host's intestinal epithelium, offering a physical route of interaction. SFB affect functions of the host immune system, among them IgA production and T-cell maturation. Until now, no human-specific SFB genome has been reported. Here, we report the metagenomic reconstruction of an SFB genome from a human ileostomy sample. Phylogenomic analysis clusters the genome with SFB genomes from mouse, rat and turkey, but the genome is genetically distinct, displaying 65-71% average amino acid identity to the others. By screening human faecal metagenomic datasets, we identified individuals carrying sequences identical to the new SFB genome. We thus conclude that a unique SFB variant exists in humans and foresee a renewed interest in the elucidation of SFB functionality in this environment. Hans Jonsson et al. report the metagenomic reconstruction of the genome of a potentially immune modulatory segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) from a human ileostomy sample. They demonstrate that the genome clusters closely with SFB genomes from other species. They also detect the unique SFB variant in human faecal metagenomics datasets.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-186437 (URN)10.1038/s42003-020-01214-7 (DOI)000569864300001 ()32887924 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-11-03 Created: 2020-11-03 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Kasmaei, K. M. & Sundh, J. (2019). Identification of Novel Putative Bacterial Feruloyl Esterases From Anaerobic Ecosystems by Use of Whole-Genome Shotgun Metagenomics and Genome Binning. Frontiers in Microbiology, 10, Article ID 2673.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of Novel Putative Bacterial Feruloyl Esterases From Anaerobic Ecosystems by Use of Whole-Genome Shotgun Metagenomics and Genome Binning
2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 10, article id 2673Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) can reduce the recalcitrance of lignocellulosic biomass to enzymatic hydrolysis, thereby enhancing biorefinery potentials or animal feeding values of the biomass. In addition, ferulic acid, a product of FAE activity, has applications in pharmaceutical and food/beverage industries. It is therefore of great interest to identify new FAEs to enhance understanding about this enzyme family. For this purpose, we used whole-genome shotgun metagenomics and genome binning to explore rumens of dairy cows, large intestines of horses, sediments of freshwater and forest topsoils to identify novel prokaryotic FAEs and trace the responsible microorganisms. A number of prokaryotic genomes were recovered of which, genomes of Clostridiales order and Candidatus Rhabdochlamydia genus showed FAE coding capacities. In total, five sequences were deemed as putative FAE. The BLASTP search against non-redundant protein database of NCBI indicated that these putative FAEs represented novel sequences within this enzyme family. The phylogenetic analysis showed that at least three putative sequences shared evolutionary lineage with FAEs of type A and thus could possess specific activities similar to this type of FAEs, something that is not previously found outside fungal kingdom. We nominate Candidatus Rhabdochlamydia genus as a novel FAE producing taxonomic unit.

Keywords
biorefinery, de novo assembly, lignocellulosic biomass, phylogenetic analysis, sequence motif, taxonomic classification
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177483 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2019.02673 (DOI)000501291500001 ()31824458 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-14 Created: 2020-01-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Alneberg, J., Sundh, J., Bennke, C., Beier, S., Lundin, D., Hugerth, L. W., . . . Andersson, A. F. (2018). BARM and BalticMicrobeDB, a reference metagenome and interface to meta-omic data for the Baltic Sea. Scientific Data, 5, Article ID 180146.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>BARM and BalticMicrobeDB, a reference metagenome and interface to meta-omic data for the Baltic Sea
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 5, article id 180146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Baltic Sea is one of the world's largest brackish water bodies and is characterised by pronounced physicochemical gradients where microbes are the main biogeochemical catalysts. Meta-omic methods provide rich information on the composition of, and activities within, microbial ecosystems, but are computationally heavy to perform. We here present the Baltic Sea Reference Metagenome (BARM), complete with annotated genes to facilitate further studies with much less computational effort. The assembly is constructed using 2.6 billion metagenomic reads from 81 water samples, spanning both spatial and temporal dimensions, and contains 6.8 million genes that have been annotated for function and taxonomy. The assembly is useful as a reference, facilitating taxonomic and functional annotation of additional samples by simply mapping their reads against the assembly. This capability is demonstrated by the successful mapping and annotation of 24 external samples. In addition, we present a public web interface, BalticMicrobeDB, for interactive exploratory analysis of the dataset. [GRAPHICS] .

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-159042 (URN)10.1038/sdata.2018.146 (DOI)000440291200001 ()30063227 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-03 Created: 2018-09-03 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Paerl, R. W., Sundh, J., Tan, D., Svenningsen, S. L., Hylander, S., Pinhassi, J., . . . Riemann, L. (2018). Prevalent reliance of bacterioplankton on exogenous vitamin B1 and precursor availability. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 115(44), E10447-E10456
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalent reliance of bacterioplankton on exogenous vitamin B1 and precursor availability
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2018 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 115, no 44, p. E10447-E10456Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vitamin B1 (B1 herein) is a vital enzyme cofactor required by virtually all cells, including bacterioplankton, which strongly influence aquatic biogeochemistry and productivity and modulate climate on Earth. Intriguingly, bacterioplankton can be de novo B1 synthesizers or B1 auxotrophs, which cannot synthesize B1 de novo and require exogenous B1 or B1 precursors to survive. Recent isolate-based work suggests select abundant bacterioplankton are B1 auxotrophs, but direct evidence of B1 auxotrophy among natural communities is scant. In addition, it is entirely unknown if bulk bacterioplankton growth is ever B1-limited. We show by surveying for B1-related genes in estuarine, marine, and freshwater metagenomes and metagenome-assembled genomes (MAGs) that most naturally occurring bacterioplankton are B1 auxotrophs. Pyrimidine B1-auxotrophic bacterioplankton numerically dominated metagenomes, but multiple other B1-auxotrophic types and distinct uptake and B1-salvaging strategies were also identified, including dual (pyrimidine and thiazole) and intact B1 auxotrophs that have received little prior consideration. Time-series metagenomes from the Baltic Sea revealed pronounced shifts in the prevalence of multiple B1-auxotrophic types and in the B1-uptake and B1salvaging strategies over time. Complementarily, we documented B1/precursor limitation of bacterioplankton production in three of five nutrient-amendment experiments at the same time-series station, specifically when intact B1 concentrations were <= 3.7 pM, based on bioassays with a genetically engineered Vibrio anguillarum B1-auxotrophic strain. Collectively, the data presented highlight the prevalent reliance of bacterioplankton on exogenous B1/precursors and on the bioavailability of the micronutrients as an overlooked factor that could influence bacterioplankton growth and succession and thereby the cycling of nutrients and energy in aquatic systems.

Keywords
vitamin B1, thiamin, bacterioplankton, metagenomics, growth limitation
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-162900 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1806425115 (DOI)000448713200018 ()30322929 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-20 Created: 2018-12-20 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Dupont, C. L., Larsson, J., Yooseph, S., Ininbergs, K., Goll, J., Asplund-Samuelsson, J., . . . Bergman, B. (2014). Functional Tradeoffs Underpin Salinity-Driven Divergence in Microbial Community Composition. PLOS ONE, 9(2), e89549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functional Tradeoffs Underpin Salinity-Driven Divergence in Microbial Community Composition
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2014 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e89549-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bacterial community composition and functional potential change subtly across gradients in the surface ocean. In contrast, while there are significant phylogenetic divergences between communities from freshwater and marine habitats, the underlying mechanisms to this phylogenetic structuring yet remain unknown. We hypothesized that the functional potential of natural bacterial communities is linked to this striking divide between microbiomes. To test this hypothesis, metagenomic sequencing of microbial communities along a 1,800 km transect in the Baltic Sea area, encompassing a continuous natural salinity gradient from limnic to fully marine conditions, was explored. Multivariate statistical analyses showed that salinity is the main determinant of dramatic changes in microbial community composition, but also of large scale changes in core metabolic functions of bacteria. Strikingly, genetically and metabolically different pathways for key metabolic processes, such as respiration, biosynthesis of quinones and isoprenoids, glycolysis and osmolyte transport, were differentially abundant at high and low salinities. These shifts in functional capacities were observed at multiple taxonomic levels and within dominant bacterial phyla, while bacteria, such as SAR11, were able to adapt to the entire salinity gradient. We propose that the large differences in central metabolism required at high and low salinities dictate the striking divide between freshwater and marine microbiomes, and that the ability to inhabit different salinity regimes evolved early during bacterial phylogenetic differentiation. These findings significantly advance our understanding of microbial distributions and stress the need to incorporate salinity in future climate change models that predict increased levels of precipitation and a reduction in salinity.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-102787 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0089549 (DOI)000332390800027 ()
Note

AuthorCount:30;

Available from: 2014-04-23 Created: 2014-04-22 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
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