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Roll-Pettersson, LiseORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3892-2794
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Jornevald, M., Roll-Pettersson, L. & Hau, H. (2024). The Good Behavior Game for students with special educational needs in mainstream education settings: A scoping review. Psychology in the schools (Print), 61(3), 861-886
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Good Behavior Game for students with special educational needs in mainstream education settings: A scoping review
2024 (English)In: Psychology in the schools (Print), ISSN 0033-3085, E-ISSN 1520-6807, Vol. 61, no 3, p. 861-886Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a classroom management strategy that consistently demonstrates its ability to promote positive behaviors and peer relations among students, with immediate and long-term benefits. This scoping review aimed to provide an overview of peer-reviewed research on the GBG specifically focused on students with special educational needs (SEN) in mainstream education settings. Following a systematic search-and-selection procedure, 30 studies were included, 26 with an experimental design and 4 with a qualitative/mixed-methods design. SEN participants were mainly subgroups of students with baseline assessments of emotional-behavioral difficulties; there was, however, substantial clinical and methodological heterogeneity across studies. Integrative findings from quantitative and qualitative studies indicate that the GBG benefits most students with SEN in mainstream settings, while results for students with severe socio-behavioral difficulties are ambiguous. We identified a paucity of research on students with neurodevelopmental diagnoses such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or autism spectrum disorder, as well as on the perspectives of students and teachers and challenges associated with the GBG for students with severe difficulties. Schools implementing the GBG should be aware that some students may need individual adaptations to participate in the GBG, and teachers may need support to implement these adaptations. 

Keywords
Good Behavior Game, scoping review, special educational needs
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223423 (URN)10.1002/pits.23086 (DOI)001069632000001 ()2-s2.0-85171854068 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-01 Created: 2023-11-01 Last updated: 2024-03-11Bibliographically approved
Bejnö, H., Roll-Pettersson, L., Klintwall Högberg, L., Långh, U., Odom, S. L. & Bölte, S. (2023). Adapting the Preschool Environment to the Needs of Children on the Autism Spectrum in Sweden: A quasi-experimental study. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 30(3), 278-297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adapting the Preschool Environment to the Needs of Children on the Autism Spectrum in Sweden: A quasi-experimental study
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2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 278-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND Children on the autism spectrum may receive Early Intensive Behavioural Intervention (EIBI) in Sweden to support development by providing learning opportunities. However, research suggests a need to improve the quality of their learning environment.

AIM This pre-registered study (#NCT03634761) aimed to evaluate the Swedish Autism Program Environment Rating Scale (APERS-P-SE) as a means to promote the quality of the pre-school learning environment for children on the autism spectrum, along with outcomes for these children, and their pre-school staff.

MATERIAL AND METHODS In a quasi-experimental study, pre-school staff (n = 35) conducted either EIBI supported by in-service training and on-site coaching based on APERS-P-SE assessment (at k = 9 preschools) or EIBI only (k = 8), during an 8-months period.

RESULTS The quality of the immediate learning environment (primary outcome) increased significantly in the EIBI/APERS-P-SE preschools. However, changes in child and pre-school staff measures were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE In-service training and on-site coaching based on APERS-P-SE assessments can increase the quality of the learning environment in Swedish pre-school. Studies of longer duration and larger sample size are required to determine if using the APERS-P-SE can also achieve desired behavioural change for children-, and impact pre-school staff applying EIBI.

Keywords
autism spectrum disorder, coaching, early intensive behavioural intervention, early intervention, environmental enrichment, learning environment
National Category
Applied Psychology Pedagogy
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-197604 (URN)10.1080/11038128.2021.1993330 (DOI)000710779700001 ()2-s2.0-85118169159 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01212
Available from: 2021-10-09 Created: 2021-10-09 Last updated: 2023-03-27Bibliographically approved
Backman, A., Zander, E., Roll-Pettersson, L., Vigerland, S. & Hirvikoski, T. (2023). Functioning and quality of life in transition-aged youth on the autism spectrum – associations with autism symptom severity and mental health problems. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 104, Article ID 102168.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functioning and quality of life in transition-aged youth on the autism spectrum – associations with autism symptom severity and mental health problems
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2023 (English)In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, ISSN 1750-9467, E-ISSN 1878-0237, Vol. 104, article id 102168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous research notes difficulties in functioning and low quality of life (QoL) among transition-age youth on the autism spectrum, and poor mental health may contribute to these difficulties. This study examined the role of autism symptom severity and mental health problems on self-reported functioning and QoL in treatment-seeking transition-age autistic youth. The study included 140 autistic youth (16–25 years, M = 20.44 (SD = 2.95); n = 91 females [65%], n = 42 males [30%], n = 7 non-binary [5%]). We assessed functioning using a structured interview and QoL through a self-report questionnaire. Factors potentially associated with functioning and QoL were assessed using standardized self-report questionnaires of autism symptom severity, symptoms of anxiety and depression, and information from medical records. Participants reported functioning on the 90th percentile compared to general population norms, indicating significant disability, and also rated low overall QoL. Regression analysis showed that autism symptom severity and anxiety symptoms, and to some extent gender and having an ADHD diagnosis, explained 46% of the variance in overall functioning. Symptoms of anxiety and depression, and to a lesser extent, active friendship, explained 43% of the variance in QoL. Sampling limitations of the study include the overrepresentation of women and newly diagnosed participants. We highlight that functioning and QoL are multifactorial, necessitating a comprehensive assessment of transition-aged autistic youth, including mental health problems, to plan tangible interventions.

Keywords
Functioning, Co-occurrence, Self-report, Autism spectrum disorder, Transition-age, Quality of life
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220223 (URN)10.1016/j.rasd.2023.102168 (DOI)000987041400001 ()2-s2.0-85153207288 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-25 Created: 2023-08-25 Last updated: 2023-08-25Bibliographically approved
Zakirova Engstrand, R., Roll-Pettersson, L., Andersson, K., Larsson, H., Allodi Westling, M. & Hirvikoski, T. (2023). Group Psychoeducational Intervention for Grandparents of Young Children with ASD: An Open Feasibility Study. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 53(2), 808-824
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group Psychoeducational Intervention for Grandparents of Young Children with ASD: An Open Feasibility Study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 808-824Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This initial open feasibility trial reports on feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of the manualized, group-based psychoeducationalintervention for grandparents of preschool-aged children with ASD provided by the outpatient habilitation servicesin Stockholm, Sweden. One hundred and twenty non-custodial grandparents participated in a 6-h intervention program. Thestudy demonstrated good feasibility: 114 (95%) grandparents completed both pre- and post-intervention measures and evaluationsand reported high intervention acceptability. The results also indicated that grandparents increased their knowledgeabout ASD from pre-intervention to post-intervention, gained skills about strategies of supporting their grandchildren andadult children, and appreciated the opportunity to meet and share experiences with other grandparents. Follow-up with arandomized controlled trial design is needed to firmly establish efficacy of this intervention.

Keywords
Feasibility, Grandparents, Psychoeducational intervention, Family systems
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200039 (URN)10.1007/s10803-021-05189-0 (DOI)000672408800003 ()34247300 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85110471180 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-12-21 Created: 2021-12-21 Last updated: 2023-10-10Bibliographically approved
Keenan, M., Dillenburger, K., Konrad, M.-H., Debetencourt, N., Vuksan, R., Kourea, L., . . . Gallagher, S. (2023). Professional Development of Behavior Analysts in Europe: A Snapshot for 21 Countries. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 16(3), 709-729
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Professional Development of Behavior Analysts in Europe: A Snapshot for 21 Countries
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2023 (English)In: Behavior Analysis in Practice, ISSN 1998-1929, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 709-729Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Behavior analysts are not recognized or regulated as a distinct profession in Europe. For the most part, European behavior analysts adhered to the standards set by the U.S.-based Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). However, the BACB certification has not been recognized officially in any European jurisdiction. The recent decision by the BACB to discontinue eligibility of non-U.S. residents to apply for the BCBA exam by the end of 2022 has brought the issue of professional regulation outside of the United States into sharp focus. This article offers a snapshot in time of professional recognition of behavior analysts in 21 European countries. It stems from the Erasmus+ funded EuroBA project and its Professional Advisory Group (PAG). The EuroBA project aims to develop common standards and competences for behavior analysts to facilitate national regulation and mutual recognition across Europe.

Keywords
professional recognition, Europe, behavior analysis, Behavior Analyst Certification Board
National Category
Applied Psychology Social Work
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-211145 (URN)10.1007/s40617-022-00754-0 (DOI)000881661000001 ()
Available from: 2022-11-11 Created: 2022-11-11 Last updated: 2023-12-12Bibliographically approved
Bejnö, H., Bölte, S., Linder, N., Långh, U., Odom, S. L. & Roll-Pettersson, L. (2022). From Someone Who May Cause Trouble to Someone You Can Play With: Stakeholders' Perspectives on Preschool Program Quality for Autistic Children. Journal of autism and developmental disorders, 52(9), 3890-3908
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From Someone Who May Cause Trouble to Someone You Can Play With: Stakeholders' Perspectives on Preschool Program Quality for Autistic Children
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2022 (English)In: Journal of autism and developmental disorders, ISSN 0162-3257, E-ISSN 1573-3432, Vol. 52, no 9, p. 3890-3908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, young autistic children typically attend community-based preschool programs, which may not be adapted to their needs. In the current study, stakeholders to autistic children receiving Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention were interviewed following a quasi-randomized study (#NCT03634761) aimed at improving the preschool program quality using the Swedish version of the Autism Program Environment Rating Scale (APERS). Stakeholders provided their perceptions and experiences concerning key factors for high quality preschool programs as well as well as their experiences of the abovementioned APERS study. Applying thematic analysis, stakeholder groups differed in what they emphasized, but all highlighted staff’s competence, children’s inclusion and participation, collaboration, and the learning environment as key program areas that had been positively influenced by the APERS-based intervention.

Keywords
Autism, Learning environment, Preschool, Program quality
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Special Education; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-197178 (URN)10.1007/s10803-021-05268-2 (DOI)000695633100001 ()34499273 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85114648632 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01212
Available from: 2021-09-28 Created: 2021-09-28 Last updated: 2022-08-16Bibliographically approved
Strömberg, D., Roll-Pettersson, L. & Awasthi, S. (2022). Monitoring indices of happiness in children with autism: Effects of a naturalistic parent-implemented play-based shaping intervention. In: 10th European Association for Behaviour Analysis Conference, Tampere, 15-18 June 2022: . Paper presented at 10th European Association for Behaviour Analysis Conference, Tampere, Finland, 15-18 June 2022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring indices of happiness in children with autism: Effects of a naturalistic parent-implemented play-based shaping intervention
2022 (English)In: 10th European Association for Behaviour Analysis Conference, Tampere, 15-18 June 2022, 2022Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Previous research indicates that indices of happiness (IOH) can provide useful information regarding the social validity of behavioural interventions. One way to measure happiness might be to simply ask the participants how they are feeling. However, when focusing on populations lacking the skills to effectively communicate their internal emotional states, such as young children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), indices other than verbal self-reports are necessary. Monitoring observable behaviours likely correlated with states of happiness can be one method. In this study, IOH were measured in two young children diagnosed with ASD, in a naturalistic parent-implemented play-based shaping intervention to improve eye contact. IOH were measured in three different social play activities per child. The parents were trained and supervised via telehealth. IOH were individualized and operationally defined for each child, based upon parent responses to a pre-intervention questionnaire, and monitored via video recordings. Interobserver agreement was 92% (range 88-100%). The results, as measured by the observed pre and post intervention IOH, as well as parents' self-reports, indicate a high degree of social validity. This study was a collaboration between Stockholm University and Behavior Momentum India, conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Keywords
autism intervention, happiness, shaping, social validity
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-206611 (URN)
Conference
10th European Association for Behaviour Analysis Conference, Tampere, Finland, 15-18 June 2022
Available from: 2022-06-20 Created: 2022-06-20 Last updated: 2022-10-04
Strömberg, D., Awasthi, S. & Roll-Pettersson, L. (2022). Teaching Eye Contact to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Through Parent Training Via Telehealth: Using Shaping Without Prompting in Social Play. In: : . Paper presented at 11th International Conference, Association for Behavior Analysis International, 1-September 1-3, 2022, Dublin, Ireland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching Eye Contact to Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Through Parent Training Via Telehealth: Using Shaping Without Prompting in Social Play
2022 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Deficits in eye contact are a common feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and has been found to negatively affect learning opportunities. Previous research has shown shaping without prompting to be effective in teaching eye contact to children diagnosed with ASD (Fonger & Malott, 2019). The current collaborative study between Behavioral Momentum, India, and Stockholm University, Sweden, conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, evaluated the effects of a shaping procedure, implemented by parents trained and supervised via telehealth, to teach two preschool-aged children with ASD to make eye contact in naturalistic social play interactions. A changing criterion design across settings was used. For each child, eye contact was taught in three different child-preferred play settings where the parent was a necessary component. The target behavior was divided into Mve successive shaping phases. Both children acquired eye contact for a duration of 1 to 2 seconds across several settings. Results suggested a high degree of social validity, as measured by the participating parents' selfreports as well as individualized indices of happiness observed in the two children.Furthermore, this study conMrms that when cultural aspects are taken into consideration, telehealth can be used to train and supervise parents across geographical regions.

National Category
Pedagogy Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-208827 (URN)
Conference
11th International Conference, Association for Behavior Analysis International, 1-September 1-3, 2022, Dublin, Ireland
Note

Paper Session #79.

Available from: 2022-09-07 Created: 2022-09-07 Last updated: 2023-12-04Bibliographically approved
Strömberg, D., Awasthi, S. & Roll-Pettersson, L. (2022). Teaching Eye Contact to Children With Autism Through Parent Training Via Telehealth: Using Shaping Without Prompting in Social Play. In: 48th Annual Convention, Association for Behavior Analysis International, May 26-30, Boston: . Paper presented at 48th Annual Convention, Association for Behavior Analysis International, May 26-30, 2022, Boston, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching Eye Contact to Children With Autism Through Parent Training Via Telehealth: Using Shaping Without Prompting in Social Play
2022 (English)In: 48th Annual Convention, Association for Behavior Analysis International, May 26-30, Boston, 2022Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Deficits in eye contact are a common feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) which has been found to negatively affect learning opportunities. Previous research has shown shaping without prompting to be effective in teaching eye contact to children diagnosed with ASD (Fonger & Malott, 2019). The current collaborative study between Behavioral Momentum, India, and Stockholm University, Sweden, evaluated the effects of a shaping procedure, implemented by parents trained and supervised via telehealth, to teach two preschool-aged children with ASD to make eye contact in naturalistic social play interactions. A multiple baseline design across settings was used. For each child, eye contact was taught in three different child-preferred play settings where the parent was a necessary component. The target behavior, eye contact, was divided into five successive learning phases. Both children acquired eye contact for a duration of 1 to 2 seconds across several settings without direct prompting. Results suggested a high degree of social validity, as measured by the participating parents' self-reports as well as indices of happiness observed in the two children. Furthermore, this study confirms that when cultural aspects are taken into consideration telehealth can be used to train and supervise parents across geographical regions.

National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Special Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-206644 (URN)
Conference
48th Annual Convention, Association for Behavior Analysis International, May 26-30, 2022, Boston, USA
Note

Paper Session #567.

Available from: 2022-06-20 Created: 2022-06-20 Last updated: 2023-12-04Bibliographically approved
Ringer, N. & Roll-Pettersson, L. (2022). Understanding parental stress among parents of children with Paediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) in Sweden. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 17(1), Article ID 2080906.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding parental stress among parents of children with Paediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) in Sweden
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 2080906Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE Paediatric Acute-onset Neuropsychiatric Syndrome (PANS) is a relatively new diagnosis characterized by an abrupt and dramatic onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), together with neuropsychiatric symptoms. Very little research has been done to understand the experience of being a parent of a child with PANS. The current study aimed to explore aspects related to parental stress in parents of children with PANS.

METHOD The study employed in-depth semi-structured individual interviews with 13 parents of children diagnosed with PANS. Parents were recruited via an announcement on the websites of patient organizations, and in waiting rooms at child medical clinics. An inductive qualitative content analysis approach was used as a guide for analysis of data.

RESULTS The analysis of interviews identified five categories of parents’ experiences of stress related to: (1) being effected by the symptoms; (2) experiencing the symptoms over and over again; (3) having no control; (4) obtaining medical treatment is challenging; and (5) managing problems. The results are discussed in relation to the Transactional Theory of Stress and Coping.

CONCLUSIONS the study illuminates how parents’ perceptions of the child’s symptoms, parents’ strategies for managing problems, as well as experiences related to healthcare providers, may increase or decrease parental stress.

Keywords
Paediatric Acute-onset neuropsychiatric syndrome, PANS, PANDAS, OCD, parental stress, coping, mental disorder, qualitative research, transactional theory, constructivist grounded theory
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-206361 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2022.2080906 (DOI)000800392700001 ()
Funder
Swedish National Institute of Public Health
Available from: 2022-06-13 Created: 2022-06-13 Last updated: 2022-06-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3892-2794

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