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Stroud, Christopher
Publications (10 of 80) Show all publications
Kerfoot, C. & Bello-Nonjengele, B. O. (2022). Towards epistemic justice: Transforming relations of knowing in multilingual classrooms. Working Papers in Urban Language & Literacies (294), 1-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards epistemic justice: Transforming relations of knowing in multilingual classrooms
2022 (English)In: Working Papers in Urban Language & Literacies, no 294, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study of a postcolonial site engages with epistemic justice from the perspective of language. It understands epistemic justice as relating to issues of knowledge, understanding, and participation in communicative practices. It suggests that monoglossic language-in-education policies, often colonial in origin, constitute a form of epistemic injustice by denying learners the opportunity to learn in a familiar language and removing their ability to make epistemic contributions, a capacity central to human value. It further suggests that translanguaging in formal school settings is for the most part geared towards a monolingual outcome, that is, towards accessing knowledge in an official language. This unidirectional impetus means that translanguaging remains an affirmative rather than transformative strategy, leaving underlying hierarchies of value and relations of knowing unchanged. In contrast, this study presents linguistic ethnographic data from a three-year pilot project in Cape Town where primary school learners could choose their medium of instruction to Grade 6 and use all languages in subject classrooms. It analyses how a Grade 6 learner used laminated, multilingual, affective and epistemic stances to construct others as knowers, negotiate epistemic authority, and promote solidarity. It proposes that, in so doing, she constructed new decolonial relations of knowing and being. It further proposes that the shift from a monolingual to a multilingual episteme, which substantially improved educational performance overall, also enabled the emergence of politically fragile yet institutionally robust social, epistemic, and moral orders from below, orders that could lay the basis for greater epistemic justice. 

 

 

Keywords
Epistemic injustice, linguistic ethnography, multilingual education, translanguaging, language-in-education policy, mother tongue education, epistemic stance, affective stance, relations of knowing, decolonial education, southern sociolinguistics
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Arts, Humanities and Social Science Education; Linguistics; Language Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202137 (URN)
Projects
Towards Epistemic Justice: Language, Identity, and Relations of Knowing in Post-colonial SchoolsMultilingualism and identities in and out of school: urban youth on the Cape Flats
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, SAB17-1020:1
Available from: 2022-02-19 Created: 2022-02-19 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Stroud, C. & Kerfoot, C. (2021). Decolonizing Higher Education: Multilingualism, Linguistic Citizenship and Epistemic Justice. In: Zannie Bock; Christopher Stroud (Ed.), Language and Decoloniality in Higher Education: Reclaiming Voices from the South (pp. 19-46). London: Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decolonizing Higher Education: Multilingualism, Linguistic Citizenship and Epistemic Justice
2021 (English)In: Language and Decoloniality in Higher Education: Reclaiming Voices from the South / [ed] Zannie Bock; Christopher Stroud, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2021, p. 19-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2021
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Linguistics; Arts, Humanities and Social Science Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-197566 (URN)1-350-04909-3 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, SAB17-1020:1
Available from: 2022-02-15 Created: 2022-02-15 Last updated: 2022-10-11Bibliographically approved
Salö, L., Hyltenstam, K., Stroud, C. & Karlander, D. (2021). Två- och flerspråkighet: Ett samtal om forskningsinriktningens uppkomst och konsolidering i Sverige. Språk och stil, 1, 13-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Två- och flerspråkighet: Ett samtal om forskningsinriktningens uppkomst och konsolidering i Sverige
2021 (Swedish)In: Språk och stil, ISSN 1101-1165, E-ISSN 2002-4010, Vol. 1, p. 13-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article presents an edited conversation between Kenneth Hyltenstam, Christopher Stroud, Linus Salö and David Karlander. Its main topic is the rise and consolidation of bilingualism research/multilingualism research as a demarcated subject area in Swedish academe. The article delves into this history via the professional, scholarly trajectories of Hyltenstam and Stroud. By mapping and discussing their involvement in the field of bilingualism/multilingualism, the article offers analytical perspectives on the formation of the field, and on the general atmosphere surrounding this process. The account focuses on past and current research themes, institutional settings and modes of knowledge exchange. The creation of the Centre for Research on Bilingualism at Stockholm University in the 1980s emerges as a significant event in the evolving account of the research area. The conversation also makes clear that the history of bi/multilingualism research encompasses a variety of agents and interests. The subject area maintains mutable connections to numerous other scientific disciplines and is susceptible to various forms of intellectual influence. It has likewise been shaped in relation to various scholarly and societal values and concerns. By clarifying some of these dynamics, the article contributes to the yet-to-be-written history of bi/multilingualism research. It also comments on conversation as a scholarly method, and clarifies the scope and strength of its claims.

Keywords
bilingualism, multilingualism, history of linguistics, sociology of science, institutional and disciplinary formation.
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Cultural Studies History Educational Sciences
Research subject
Bilingualism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-191081 (URN)10.33063/diva-434149 (DOI)
Available from: 2021-03-08 Created: 2021-03-08 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Stroud, C. & Kerfoot, C. (2020). Decolonising Higher Education: Multilingualism, Linguistic Citizenship & Epistemic Justice. King's College London, Centre for Language Discourse & Communication (265)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decolonising Higher Education: Multilingualism, Linguistic Citizenship & Epistemic Justice
2020 (English)Report (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper explores in what ways language – and multilingualism in particular – can be rethought in order to further epistemic justice. In order to situate the question of language in a broader decolonial project, it starts by critically reviewing three main strategies that have been proposed to address epistemic injustice in South African Higher Education over the last thirty years: scaffolding into colonial metropolitan languages, intellectualization and/or endogenization, and the use of translanguaging. It argues that the role of language/multilingualism in such strategies is compromised by the ‘coloniality of language’ (Veronelli 2015), that is, understandings of language inherited from the colonial project. It further advances the notion of Linguistic Citizenship (LC) (Stroud 2001, 2017) as a way of disengaging from coloniality. LC informs epistemic justice by focusing on the potential carried by language(s) for ontological refashioning of selves, socialities, and concomitant knowledges, thereby offering a way to rethink multilingualism as a transformative epistemology and methodology of difference.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
King's College London, Centre for Language Discourse & Communication, 2020. p. 1
Series
Working Papers in Urban Language & Literacies ; 265
National Category
Languages and Literature Educational Sciences
Research subject
Bilingualism; Education in Languages and Language Development; Arts, Humanities and Social Science Education; Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-185876 (URN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, SAB17-1020:1
Available from: 2020-10-14 Created: 2020-10-14 Last updated: 2022-10-11Bibliographically approved
Kerfoot, C. (2020). Making absences present: Language policy from below. Multilingual Margins, 7(1), 69-76
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making absences present: Language policy from below
2020 (English)In: Multilingual Margins, ISSN 2221-4216, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A commentary on the Special Issue ‘Grassroots participation and agency in bilingual education processes in Mozambique’. This Special Issue continues the decolonial task of making absences present: of bringing into the frame the linguistic and other knowledges traditionally excluded from educational policy and curricula, and pointing the way to more ethical and equitable forms of knowledge exchange among community members, learners, teachers, researchers, and state actors.

Keywords
bilingual education, language policy, coloniality, linguistic citizenship, southern theory, decolonization
National Category
Languages and Literature
Research subject
Arts, Humanities and Social Science Education; Linguistics; Education in Languages and Language Development
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-183749 (URN)
Available from: 2020-09-09 Created: 2020-09-09 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Bock, Z., Dalwai, N. & Stroud, C. (2018). Cool mobilities: Youth style and mobile telephony in contemporary South Africa. In: Cecelia Cutler, Unn Røyneland (Ed.), Multilingual Youth Practices in Computer Mediated Communication: (pp. 51-67). New York: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cool mobilities: Youth style and mobile telephony in contemporary South Africa
2018 (English)In: Multilingual Youth Practices in Computer Mediated Communication / [ed] Cecelia Cutler, Unn Røyneland, New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 51-67Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Languages and Literature General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Bilingualism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-163768 (URN)9781107091733 (ISBN)9781108635943 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Heugh, K. & Stroud, C. (2018). Diversities, affinities and diasporas: a southern lens and methodology for understanding multilingualisms. Current Issues in Language Planning, 20(1), 1-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversities, affinities and diasporas: a southern lens and methodology for understanding multilingualisms
2018 (English)In: Current Issues in Language Planning, ISSN 1466-4208, E-ISSN 1747-7506, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We frame multilingualisms through a growing interest in a linguistics and sociology of the 'south' and acknowledge earlier contributions of linguists in Africa, the Americas and Asia who have engaged with human mobility, linguistic contact and consequential ecologies that alter over time and space. Recently, conversations of multilingualism have drifted in two directions. Southern conversations have become intertwined with 'de-colonial theory', and with 'southern' theory, thinking and epistemologies. In these, 'southern' is regarded as a metaphor for marginality, coloniality and entanglements of the geopolitical north and south. Northern debates that receive traction appear to focus on recent 're-awakenings' in Europe and North America that mis-remember southern experiences of linguistic diversity. We provide a contextual backdrop for articles in this issue that illustrate intelligences of multilingualisms and the linguistic citizenship of southern people. In these, southern multilingualisms are revealed as phenomena, rather than as a phenomenon defined usually in English. The intention is to suggest a third direction of mutual advantage in rethinking the social imaginary in relation to communality, entanglements and interconnectivities of both South and North.

Keywords
Affinities, diasporas, decoloniality, linguistic citizenship, southern multilingualisms
National Category
Educational Sciences Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-163830 (URN)10.1080/14664208.2018.1507543 (DOI)000454076600001 ()
Available from: 2019-01-09 Created: 2019-01-09 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Stroud, C. (2018). Introduction: Language Rights and Linguistic Citizenship. In: Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee (Ed.), The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a politics of language for agency and change (pp. 1-14). Bristol: Multilingual Matters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introduction: Language Rights and Linguistic Citizenship
2018 (English)In: The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a politics of language for agency and change / [ed] Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018
Series
Encounters ; 11
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Bilingualism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-164131 (URN)978-1-78309-964-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-13 Created: 2019-01-13 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Stroud, C. (2018). Linguistic Citizenship. In: Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee (Ed.), The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a politics of language for agency and change (pp. 17-39). Bristol: Multilingual Matters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linguistic Citizenship
2018 (English)In: The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a politics of language for agency and change / [ed] Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018, p. 17-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2018
Series
Encounters ; 11
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Bilingualism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-164130 (URN)978-1-78309-964-1 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-01-13 Created: 2019-01-13 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Kerfoot, C. (2018). Making and Shaping Participatory Spaces: Resemiotization and Citizenship Agency in South Africa. In: Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee (Ed.), The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a Politics of Language for Agency and Change (pp. 263-288). Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making and Shaping Participatory Spaces: Resemiotization and Citizenship Agency in South Africa
2018 (English)In: The Multilingual Citizen: Towards a Politics of Language for Agency and Change / [ed] Lisa Lim, Christopher Stroud, Lionel Wee, Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters, 2018, p. 263-288Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In South Africa, democratic consolidation involves not only building a new state but also new interfaces between state and society. In order to strengthen the agency of citizens at these interfaces, recent approaches to development stress the notion of ‘participatory citizenship’ which recasts citizenship as practised rather than given. The purpose of this paper is to explore the links between such practices of participatory citizenship and possibilities for literacy and language education in state adult learning centres. It draws on an impact study of a capacity building programme for educators of adults in the Northern Cape Province and uses interviews and document analysis to explore the ways in which meaning-making unfolded in new participatory spaces. It argues that such processes can be seen as  a form of ‘linguistic citizenship’ in which individuals and groups re-shaped the multilingual representational resources available to them to validate the authority of subaltern actors and mobilise collective agency. It uses the concept of resemiotisation (Iedema 1999) to investigate how the choice of different semiotic complexes enabled or constrained participation and to offer a set of principles for reconceptualising the provision of adult basic education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters, 2018
Series
Encounters ; 11
Keywords
Adult basic education, agency, citizenship, development, linguistic citizenship, literacy, multilingualism, resemiotisation, voice
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Bilingualism
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-27042 (URN)9781783099658 (ISBN)9781783099665 (ISBN)
Note

Revised version of 2011 article, updated and postcript added.

Available from: 2009-04-22 Created: 2009-04-22 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
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