Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Giannotta, F., Nilsson, K. W., Åslund, C., Olofdotter, S., Vadlin, S. & Larm, P. (2024). Anxiety, Sleep Problems, and Vigorous Physical Activity: Bidirectional Associations from Early Adolescence to Early Adulthood in Swedish Adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 53(6), 1355-1369
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety, Sleep Problems, and Vigorous Physical Activity: Bidirectional Associations from Early Adolescence to Early Adulthood in Swedish Adolescents
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, ISSN 0047-2891, E-ISSN 1573-6601, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 1355-1369Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Anxiety symptoms and sleep problems typically emerge during adolescence and are frequently intertwined. However, there is a dearth of knowledge concerning their reciprocal influence and whether physical activity might play a protective role in this relationship. The present study aims at filling this gap exploring also the moderating role of sex. 915 13-year-old Swedish adolescents (56% girls) answered a survey conducted four times: at ages 13 (T1), 16 (T2), 19 (T3), and 22 (T4). A random intercept cross-lagged panel model was used. At within-levels, sleep problems and anxiety symptoms had a bidirectional positive association in middle adolescence. Vigorous physical activity and anxiety symptoms showed a reciprocal negative association from middle adolescence. Vigorous physical activity and sleep problems were reciprocally associated only in late adolescence. Associations were the same for girls and boys. This study demonstrated that the relations between anxiety symptoms, sleep problems, and vigorous physical activity cannot be understood without adopting a developmental perspective and that middle adolescence is a crucial period to plan interventions to reduce anxiety symptoms and sleep problems.

Keywords
Anxiety, Sleep problems, RI-CPLM, Physical activity, Reciprocal associations
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228871 (URN)10.1007/s10964-024-01980-1 (DOI)001197349700002 ()38580891 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85189607014 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-06 Created: 2024-05-06 Last updated: 2024-05-06Bibliographically approved
Buli, B. G., Larm, P., Nilsson, K. W., Hellström-Olsson, C. & Giannotta, F. (2024). Trends in mental health problems among Swedish adolescents: Do school-related factors play a role?. PLOS ONE, 19(3), Article ID e0300294.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in mental health problems among Swedish adolescents: Do school-related factors play a role?
Show others...
2024 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 19, no 3, article id e0300294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim

The aim of this study is to investigate the extent to which school-related factors, such as school liking, participation in decision-making, school-related parental support, teachers’ support, and school physical environment, explain trends in mental health problems. The problems considered are psychosomatic symptoms (PSS), depressive symptoms (DS), suicidal ideations (SI), and suicide attempts (SA) among Swedish adolescents of varying socioeconomic status (SES) from 2004 to 2020.

Methods

We analyzed data collected through repeated cross-sectional surveys from 19,873 15-year-old students at schools in a county in Sweden. Boys and girls each constituted 50% of the participants. We fitted linear and logistic regression models to investigate associations between the school-related factors and trends in mental health problems.

Results

Increased school-related parental support and school liking were cross-sectionally associated with decreased PSS, DS and SI, with school liking also associated with decreased SA. Conducive school physical environment was also found to be cross-sectionally associated with lower PSS and DS scores. Over time, mental health problems have shown a general increase among adolescents in the low SES group and a decrease among those in the high SES group. While school-related factors explained the improvement in mental health in the high SES group, we found such association only between parental support trends in PSS and DS, along with participation and trends in SA over time among adolescents in the low SES group.

Conclusions

The results show that school-related factors play significant roles in influencing adolescent mental health. The influence, however, varied across SES gradients over time. This suggests that working against inequities in school-related factors would help address inequities in mental health.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228231 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0300294 (DOI)001181701200063 ()38457463 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85187514377 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-10 Created: 2024-04-10 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Buli, B. G., Lehtinen-Jacks, S., Larm, P., Nilsson, K. W., Hellström-Olsson, C. & Giannotta, F. (2024). Trends in psychosomatic symptoms among adolescents and the role of lifestyle factors. BMC Public Health, 24, Article ID 878.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in psychosomatic symptoms among adolescents and the role of lifestyle factors
Show others...
2024 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 24, article id 878Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Adolescent mental health problems are on the rise globally, including in Sweden. One indicator of this trend is increased psychosomatic symptoms (PSS) over time. Lifestyle factors such as physical activity (PA), diet, smoking, and alcohol consumption may influence the time trends in PSS; however, the evidence base is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate associations between time trends in PSS and lifestyle factors.

Methods The study was based on data collected from a nationally representative sample of 9,196 fifteen-year-old boys and girls in Sweden using the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) symptom checklist. The sample comprised nearly equal proportions of girls (50.5%) and boys. The lifestyle factors examined in this study included PA, regular breakfast intake, consumption of fruits, vegetables, sweets, or soft drinks, smoking, and alcohol drunkenness. We used data from 2002 to 2018 and stratified by family affluence scale (FAS) to demonstrate how the associations varied among the FAS groups. We fitted separate regression models for the high- and low-FAS groups, where interaction terms between the year of survey and each lifestyle factor were used to estimate the level and direction of associations between the factors and trends in PSS.

Results There was a generally increasing trend in PSS mean scores from 2.26 in 2002 to 2.49 in 2018 (p <.001). The changes in each survey year compared to the average mean scores during the preceding years were significant in all years except 2010. Regular breakfast intake, daily fruit and vegetable consumption, and higher PA were associated with lower PSS mean scores, while smoking and drunkenness had opposite associations with PSS. The only significant interaction between survey year and the lifestyle factors was observed regarding drunkenness in the high FAS group, suggesting that the association between trends in PSS and the experience of getting drunk at least twice got stronger over time (B = 0.057; CI:0.016, 0.097; p <.01).

Conclusions The results indicate increasing trends in PSS among young people in Sweden from 2002 to 2018, with a significant increase observed among adolescents in the high FAS group who reported getting drunk on at least two occasions.

Keywords
Adolescent, Mental health, Psychosomatic symptoms, Lifestyle factors, Trends
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228697 (URN)10.1186/s12889-024-18327-x (DOI)001188909400007 ()38515098 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85188601608 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-29 Created: 2024-04-29 Last updated: 2024-04-29Bibliographically approved
Ramstedt, M., Raninen, J., Larm, P. & Livingston, M. (2023). Children with problem-drinking parents in a Swedish national sample: is the risk of harm related to the severity of parental problem drinking? . European Journal of Public Health, 33(2), 312-316
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children with problem-drinking parents in a Swedish national sample: is the risk of harm related to the severity of parental problem drinking? 
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 312-316Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this paper is to examine the link between severity in exposure to parental problem drinking in a Swedish national population sample of children aged 15–16 years. Specifically, we assessed whether the risk of poor health, poor relationships and a problematic school situation increase with severity in exposure to parental problem drinking.

Methods: National population survey from 2017 with a representative sample of 5 576 adolescents born in 2001. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). A short version of The Children of Alcoholics Screening Test, CAST-6, was used to identify children with problem-drinking parents. Health status, social relations and school situation were assessed by well-established measures.

Results: The risk of having poor health, poor school performance and poor social relations increased with severity of parental problem drinking. The risk was lowest among children least severely affected (Crude models ranged from OR: 1.2, 95% CI 1.0–1.4 to OR: 2.2, 95% CI 1.8–2.6) and highest among children most severely affected (Crude models ranges from OR: 1.7, 95% CI 1.3–2.1 to OR: 6.6, 95% CI 5.1–8.6). The risk became lower when adjusting for gender and socioeconomic position but were still higher compared to children without problem-drinking parents.

Conclusions: Appropriate screening and intervention programs are necessary for children with problem-drinking parents especially when exposure is severe but also at mild forms of exposure.

National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215436 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckad022 (DOI)000933942900001 ()36794630 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151574397 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-17 Created: 2023-03-17 Last updated: 2023-04-20Bibliographically approved
Larm, P., Hellström, C., Raninen, J., Åslund, C., Nilsson, K. W. & Giannotta, F. (2023). Do non-drinking youth drink less alcohol in young adulthood or do they catch up? Findings from a Swedish birth cohort. European Journal of Public Health, 33(4), 640-644
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do non-drinking youth drink less alcohol in young adulthood or do they catch up? Findings from a Swedish birth cohort
Show others...
2023 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 640-644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Alcohol consumption among adolescents has declined considerably during the last two decades. However, it is unknown if these adolescents’ alcohol consumption will remain low as they grow older. To our knowledge, this is one of the first studies that uses longitudinal data to examine if non-drinking adolescents have a lower alcohol consumption in young adulthood or if they catch up. Methods: A self-report survey was distributed to a birth cohort (n = 794) born in 1997 in a Swedish region when cohort members attended ninth grade (age 14–15 years) in 2012. Responders were divided into non-drinkers and alcohol users and assessed again in their late teens (17–18 years) and young adulthood (20–21 years). Results: In their late teens (17–18 years), non-drinkers at baseline consumed less alcohol and had a lower probability of harmful use compared with their alcohol-using peers. In young adulthood (20–21 years), these effects disappeared when adjustment was made for covariates. However, a stratified analysis showed that non-drinking adolescents low in conduct problems consumed less alcohol and had a lower probability of harmful use in young adulthood than alcohol-using peers. Conclusions: This study suggests that the decline in alcohol use among adolescents in the past decades may be associated with a lower alcohol consumption in the late teens and young adulthood among those low in conduct problems. This may have promising implications for alcohol-related morbidity and mortality.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-217347 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/ckad057 (DOI)000972775800001 ()37080565 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-06-02 Created: 2023-06-02 Last updated: 2023-08-16Bibliographically approved
Giannotta, F., Nilsson, K. W., Åslund, C. & Larm, P. (2023). Frequency of vigorous physical activity and depressive symptoms across adolescence: Disentangling the reciprocal associations between different groups and subtypes of symptoms. Mental Health and Physical Activity, 25, Article ID 100536.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frequency of vigorous physical activity and depressive symptoms across adolescence: Disentangling the reciprocal associations between different groups and subtypes of symptoms
2023 (English)In: Mental Health and Physical Activity, ISSN 1755-2966, E-ISSN 1878-0199, Vol. 25, article id 100536Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physical activity has a demonstrated positive effect on youth depressive symptoms. However, very few studies have explored the bi-directionality of the links between physical activity and depression. The present study aims at filling this gap and tests whether any associations are moderated by sex. Moreover, the role of subtype of depressive symptoms, vegetative (i.e., lack of energy, poor sleep) or non-vegetative (i.e., mood-related), is explored. Participants were 910 12–13 year-old Swedish adolescents (56% girls) who answered a three-wave survey at ages 12–13 (T1), 15–16 (T2), and 18–19 (T3). Using a cross-lagged structural model, depression predicted decreased frequency of vigorous physical activity (VPA) from T1 to T2 (β = −0.09, p < .05) and from T2 to T3 (β = −0.10, p < .01), while frequency of VPA at T2 decreased depression at T3 (β = −0.12, p < .05). Associations did not differ between boys and girls. Non-vegetative symptoms predicted decreased frequency of VPA from T1 to T2 (β = −0.10, p < .05), while frequency of VPA at T2 predicted decreased non-vegetative symptoms at T3 (β = −0.15, p < .05). Vegetative symptoms predicted decreased frequency of VPA from T1 to T2 (β = −0.09, p < .05), while have a reciprocal influence with VPA from T2 to T3. Overall, our results highlight an association across adolescence between VPA and depression. The association becomes stronger and reciprocal in middle adolescence, which suggests this period as an effective developmental time to plan physical-activity-based interventions to decrease youth depressive symptoms.

Keywords
Depressive symptoms, Physical activity, VPA, Adolescence, Reciprocal associations
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221209 (URN)10.1016/j.mhpa.2023.100536 (DOI)001030645100001 ()
Available from: 2023-09-20 Created: 2023-09-20 Last updated: 2023-09-20Bibliographically approved
Söderqvist, F. & Larm, P. (2023). Psychometric evaluation of the mental health continuum - short form in Swedish adolescents. Current Psychology, 42(3), 2136-2144
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric evaluation of the mental health continuum - short form in Swedish adolescents
2023 (English)In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 2136-2144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Mental Health Continuum - Short form (MHC-SF) is a self-report measure that has been increasingly used to monitor mental well-being at the population level. The aim of this study was to evaluate, for the first time, the psychometric properties of the MHC-SF in a population of Swedish adolescents. First, the evaluation was performed by examining face validity and test-retest reliability obtained in a pre-study. Then using data from the Survey of Adolescent Life in Vestmanland 2020 (n = 3880) we performed confirmatory factor analysis on different factor structures based on theory and previous research. Model-based estimates were calculated for assessing the internal reliability of the factor structure with the best fit. Convergent validity was assessed by bivariate as well as model-based correlations, and test-retest reliability was evaluated by intra-class correlation coefficients. The results show that the MHC-SF is best described with a bifactor model consisting of a dominant general well-being factor and three specific group factors of emotional, social and psychological well-being. Its overall reliability was high to very high, while the reliability of its subscales was low. A practical implication of the latter is that the subcales should not be used on their own because they are more likely to reliably measure the general well-being factor than the specific group factors. Test-retest reliability of the total scale was acceptable, and convergent validity was supported. In conclusion, we consider the Swedish MHC-SF to be a psychometrically sound instrument for monitoring overall mental well-being in Swedish adolescents.

Keywords
Positive mental health, Positive epidemiology, Well-being, Adolescence
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-193006 (URN)10.1007/s12144-021-01626-6 (DOI)000629868700002 ()2-s2.0-85102988781 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-07 Created: 2021-05-07 Last updated: 2023-03-27Bibliographically approved
Buli, B. G., Larm, P., Nilsson, K. & Giannotta, F. (2023). Trends in adolescent mental health problems 2004–2020: do sex and socioeconomic status play any role?. Scandinavian Journal of Public Health
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trends in adolescent mental health problems 2004–2020: do sex and socioeconomic status play any role?
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aims: This study aims to investigate trends in four types of adolescent mental health problems; that is, psychosomatic symptoms, depressive symptoms, suicidal ideations, and suicide attempts 2004–2020. A second aim is to investigate the moderating roles of socioeconomic status and sex in these trends.

Methods: The analysis is based on repeated cross-sectional data 2004–2020 among grade 9 students in secondary schools in a Swedish county. In total, data from 19,873 students were included in the analysis. We fitted linear and logistic regression equations and used survey-years’ coefficients to estimate the trends. We also estimated the moderating effects of socioeconomic status and sex using interactions between survey year and socioeconomic status and sex, respectively.

Results: The trends in all mental health problems declined over time. Through its interaction with survey year, socioeconomic status moderated the trends; psychosomatic symptoms (B = −0.115, P<0.001), depressive symptoms (B = −0.084, P<0.001) and suicidal ideations (odds ratio 0.953, confidence interval 0.924–0.983) significantly declined over time among those with high socioeconomic status. However, socioeconomic status did not have an association with the trend in suicide attempts. Interaction between sex and year of survey was associated with significant decreasing trends in depressive symptoms and suicidal ideations only among girls.

Conclusions: Adolescent mental health problems have decreased over time, but only for adolescents with high socioeconomic status, or only in depressive symptoms and suicidal ideations for girls. The results shed light on the growing inequalities in health outcomes across levels of socioeconomic status.

Keywords
Trends, mental health, adolescents, sex, socioeconomic status, SES
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220208 (URN)10.1177/14034948231165552 (DOI)000980095200001 ()37139789 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85158889938 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-28 Created: 2023-08-28 Last updated: 2023-08-28
Raninen, J., Livingston, M., Ramstedt, M., Zetterqvist, M., Larm, P. & Svensson, J. (2022). 17 Is the New 15: Changing Alcohol Consumption among Swedish Youth. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 19(3), Article ID 1645.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>17 Is the New 15: Changing Alcohol Consumption among Swedish Youth
Show others...
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 19, no 3, article id 1645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To examine and compare trends in drinking prevalence in nationally representative samples of Swedish 9th and 11th grade students between 2000 and 2018. A further aim is to compare drinking behaviours in the two age groups during years with similar drinking prevalence. Data were drawn from annual surveys of a nationally representative sample of students in year 9 (15–16 years old) and year 11 (17–18 years old). The data covered 19 years for year 9 and 16 years for year 11. Two reference years where the prevalence of drinking was similar were extracted for further comparison, 2018 for year 11 (n = 4878) and 2005 for year 9 (n = 5423). The reference years were compared with regard to the volume of drinking, heavy episodic drinking, having had an accident and quarrelling while drunk. The prevalence of drinking declined in both age groups during the study period. The rate of decline was somewhat higher among year 9 students. In 2018, the prevalence of drinking was the same for year 11 students as it was for year 9 students in 2005. The volume of drinking was lower among year 11 students in 2018 than year 9 students in 2005. No differences were observed for heavy episodic drinking. The decline in drinking has caused a displacement of consumption so that today’s 17–18-year-olds have a similar drinking behaviour to what 15–16-year-olds had in 2005.

Keywords
alcohol, youth, survey, Sweden, age of onset
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202619 (URN)10.3390/ijerph19031645 (DOI)000756297900001 ()35162666 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-03-09 Created: 2022-03-09 Last updated: 2022-03-09Bibliographically approved
Giannotta, F., Nilsson, K. W., Åslund, C. & Larm, P. (2022). Among the swedish generation of adolescents who experience an increased trend of psychosomatic symptoms. Do they develop depression and/or anxiety disorders as they grow older?. BMC Psychiatry, 22, Article ID 779.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Among the swedish generation of adolescents who experience an increased trend of psychosomatic symptoms. Do they develop depression and/or anxiety disorders as they grow older?
2022 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 22, article id 779Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite an increase in mental health problems, with psychosomatic symptoms having been observed in new generations of Swedish youth, the extent to which these problems correspond to an increase in adult mental problems is unknown. The present study investigates whether Swedish adolescents with high levels of psychosomatic symptoms are at risk of developing depression and anxiety problems in adulthood and whether sex moderates any association. Moreover, we aim to understand whether different clusters of youth psychosomatic symptoms – somatic, psychological and musculoskeletal – have different impacts on adult mental health.

Methods: One thousand five hundred forty-five Swedish adolescents – aged 13 (49%) and 15 (51%) – completed surveys at baseline (T1) and 3 years later (T2); of them, 1174 (61% females) also participated after 6 years (T3). Multivariate logistic models were run.

Results: Youth with high levels of psychosomatic symptoms had higher odds of high levels of depressive symptoms at T2 and T3. Moreover, psychosomatic symptoms at T1 predicted a high level of anxiety symptoms and diagnoses of anxiety disorders at T3. When analyzed separately, musculoskeletal symptoms predicted higher odds of having high levels of depressive symptoms at T2 and T3 while somatic symptoms predicted high levels of anxiety symptoms at T2. Moreover, somatic symptoms at T1 predicted diagnoses of depression and anxiety disorders at T3. Sex did not moderate any of the relationships.

Conclusions: The study supports the idea that an increase in mental health problems, such as psychosomatic symptoms, can seriously impact the psychological health of new generations of young adults.

Keywords
Psychosomatic symptoms, Somatic symptoms, Musculoskeletal symptoms, Depression, Adolescents, Anxiety
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213847 (URN)10.1186/s12888-022-04432-x (DOI)000897812500002 ()36503425 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143837964 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-18 Created: 2023-01-18 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4233-0564

Search in DiVA

Show all publications