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Xiao, S., Ebner, N. C., Manzouri, A., Li, T.-Q., Sanchez Cortes, D., Månsson, K. N. .. & Fischer, H. (2024). Age-dependent effects of oxytocin in brain regions enriched with oxytocin receptors. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 160, Article ID 106666.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-dependent effects of oxytocin in brain regions enriched with oxytocin receptors
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2024 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 160, article id 106666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although intranasal oxytocin administration to tap into central functions is the most commonly used non-invasive means for exploring oxytocin’s role in human cognition and behavior, the way by which intranasal oxytocin acts on the brain is not yet fully understood. Recent research suggests that brain regions densely populated with oxytocin receptors may play a central role in intranasal oxytocin’s action mechanisms in the brain. In particular, intranasal oxytocin may act directly on (subcortical) regions rich in oxytocin receptors via binding to these receptors while only indirectly affecting other (cortical) regions via their neural connections to oxytocin receptor-enriched regions. Aligned with this notion, the current study adopted a novel approach to test 1) whether the connections between oxytocin receptor-enriched regions (i.e., the thalamus, pallidum, caudate nucleus, putamen, and olfactory bulbs) and other regions in the brain were responsive to intranasal oxytocin administration, and 2) whether oxytocin-induced effects varied as a function of age. Forty-six young (24.96 ± 3.06 years) and 44 older (69.89 ± 2.99 years) participants were randomized, in a double-blind procedure, to self-administer either intranasal oxytocin or placebo before resting-state fMRI. Results supported age-dependency in the effects of intranasal oxytocin administration on connectivity between oxytocin receptor-enriched regions and other regions in the brain. Specifically, compared to placebo, oxytocin decreased both connectivity density and connectivity strength of the thalamus for young participants while it increased connectivity density and connectivity strength of the caudate for older participants. These findings inform the mechanisms underlying the effects of exogenous oxytocin on brain function and highlight the importance of age in these processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
oxytocin, age, resting-state functional connectivity, oxytocin receptor, quantitative data-driven analysis framework
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223696 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2023.106666 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2013-00854
Available from: 2023-11-14 Created: 2023-11-14 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Laukka, P., Månsson, K. N. .., Sanchez Cortes, D., Manzouri, A., Frick, A., Fredborg, W. & Fischer, H. (2024). Neural correlates of individual differences in multimodal emotion recognition ability. Cortex, 175, 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neural correlates of individual differences in multimodal emotion recognition ability
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2024 (English)In: Cortex, ISSN 0010-9452, E-ISSN 1973-8102, Vol. 175, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies have reported substantial variability in emotion recognition ability (ERA) – an important social skill – but possible neural underpinnings for such individual differences are not well understood. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study investigated neural responses during emotion recognition in young adults (N=49) who were selected for inclusion based on their performance (high or low) during previous testing of ERA. Participants were asked to judge brief video recordings in a forced-choice emotion recognition task, wherein stimuli were presented in visual, auditory and multimodal (audiovisual) blocks. Emotion recognition rates during brain scanning confirmed that individuals with high (vs. low) ERA received higher accuracy for all presentation blocks. fMRI-analyses focused on key regions of interest (ROIs) involved in the processing of multimodal emotion expressions, based on previous meta-analyses. In neural response to emotional stimuli contrasted with neutral stimuli, individuals with high (vs. low) ERA showed higher activation in the following ROIs during the multimodal condition: right middle superior temporal gyrus (mSTG), right posterior superior temporal sulcus (PSTS), and right inferior frontal cortex (IFC). Overall, results suggest that individual variability in ERA may be reflected across several stages of decisional processing, including extraction (mSTG), integration (PSTS) and evaluation (IFC) of emotional information.

Keywords
emotion recognition, facial expression, fMRI, individual differences, vocal expression
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228739 (URN)10.1016/j.cortex.2024.03.009 (DOI)001236628700001 ()38691922 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85191491399 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council (2012-00801 to P.L and 2013-00854 to H.F.) and the Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation (MMW 2018.0059 to P.L). Open access funding was provided by Stockholm University.

Available from: 2024-04-24 Created: 2024-04-24 Last updated: 2024-07-01Bibliographically approved
Fischer, H., Nilsson, M. E. & Ebner, N. C. (2024). Why the Single-N Design Should Be the Default in Affective Neuroscience. Affective Science, 5(1), 62-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why the Single-N Design Should Be the Default in Affective Neuroscience
2024 (English)In: Affective Science, ISSN 2662-2041, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 62-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many studies in affective neuroscience rely on statistical procedures designed to estimate population averages and base their main conclusions on group averages. However, the obvious unit of analysis in affective neuroscience is the individual, not the group, because emotions are individual phenomena that typically vary across individuals. Conclusions based on group averages may therefore be misleading or wrong, if interpreted as statements about emotions of an individual, or meaningless, if interpreted as statements about the group, which has no emotions. We therefore advocate the Single-N design as the default strategy in research on emotions, testing one or several individuals extensively with the primary purpose of obtaining results at the individual level. In neuroscience, the equivalent to the Single-N design is deep imaging, the emerging trend of extensive measurements of activity in single brains. Apart from the fact that individuals react differently to emotional stimuli, they also vary in shape and size of their brains. Group-based analysis of brain imaging data therefore refers to an “average brain” that was activated in a way that may not be representative of the physiology of any of the tested individual brains, nor of how these brains responded to the experimental stimuli. Deep imaging avoids such group-averaging artifacts by simply focusing on the individual brain. This methodological shift toward individual analysis has already opened new research areas in fields like vision science. Inspired by this, we call for a corresponding shift in affective neuroscience, away from group averages, and toward experimental designs targeting the individual.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
Keywords
psychophysics approach, brain imaging, methods, emotion
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215760 (URN)10.1007/s42761-023-00182-5 (DOI)001044341900001 ()2-s2.0-85159342538 (Scopus ID)
Note

Open access funding provided by Stockholm University. NCE was funded through NIH/NIA grants R01AG072658, R01AG057764, and R01AG059809 as well as FLDOH grants 22A12 and 21A09.

Available from: 2023-03-27 Created: 2023-03-27 Last updated: 2024-04-25Bibliographically approved
Högman, L., Gavalova, G., Laukka, P., Kristiansson, M., Källman, M. V., Fischer, H. & Johansson, A. G. M. (2023). Cognition, prior aggression, and psychopathic traits in relation to impaired multimodal emotion recognition in psychotic spectrum disorders. Frontiers in Psychiatry, 14, Article ID 1111896.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cognition, prior aggression, and psychopathic traits in relation to impaired multimodal emotion recognition in psychotic spectrum disorders
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1664-0640, Vol. 14, article id 1111896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Psychopathic traits have been associated with impaired emotion recognition in criminal, clinical and community samples. A recent study however, suggested that cognitive impairment reduced the relationship between psychopathy and emotion recognition. We therefore investigated if reasoning ability and psychomotor speed were impacting emotion recognition in individuals with psychotic spectrum disorders (PSD) with and without a history of aggression, as well as in healthy individuals, more than self-rated psychopathy ratings on the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (TriPM). 

Methods: Eighty individuals with PSD (schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, delusional disorder, other psychoses, psychotic bipolar disorder) and documented history of aggression (PSD+Agg) were compared with 54 individuals with PSD without prior aggression (PSD-Agg) and with 86 healthy individuals on the Emotion Recognition Assessment in Multiple Modalities (ERAM test). Individuals were psychiatrically stable and in remission from possible substance use disorders. Scaled scores on matrix reasoning, averages of dominant hand psychomotor speed and self-rated TriPM scores were obtained. 

Results: Associations existed between low reasoning ability, low psychomotor speed, patient status and prior aggression with total accuracy on the ERAM test. PSD groups performed worse than the healthy group. Whole group correlations between total and subscale scores of TriPM to ERAM were found, but no associations with TriPM scores within each group or in general linear models when accounting for reasoning ability, psychomotor speed, understanding of emotion words and prior aggression. 

Conclusion: Self-rated psychopathy was not independently linked to emotion recognition in PSD groups when considering prior aggression, patient status, reasoning ability, psychomotor speed and emotion word understanding. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
emotion recognition, psychosis, schizophrenia, aggression, violence, psychopathy
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology
Research subject
Psychiatry; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-219207 (URN)10.3389/fpsyt.2023.1111896 (DOI)
Note

Funding was provided by Vetenskapsrådet (2021-06362), Region Stockholm (ALF-952824 and 951046), Svenska Läkaresällskapet (779731 and 589661), and Fredrik and Ingrid Thuring’s fund (00127 och 00264).

Available from: 2023-07-16 Created: 2023-07-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Döllinger, L., Letellier, I., Högman, L., Laukka, P., Fischer, H. & Hau, S. (2023). Trainee psychotherapists’ emotion recognition accuracy during 1.5 years of psychotherapy education compared to a control group: No improvement after psychotherapy training. PeerJ, 11, Article ID e16235.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trainee psychotherapists’ emotion recognition accuracy during 1.5 years of psychotherapy education compared to a control group: No improvement after psychotherapy training
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2023 (English)In: PeerJ, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 11, article id e16235Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to recognize and work with patients’ emotions is considered an important part of most psychotherapy approaches. Surprisingly, there is little systematic research on psychotherapists' ability to recognize other people’s emotional expressions. In this study, we compared trainee psychotherapists’ non-verbal emotion recognition accuracy to a control group of undergraduate students at two time points: at the beginning and at the end of one and a half years of theoretical and practical psychotherapy training. Emotion recognition accuracy (ERA) was assessed using two standardized computer tasks, one for recognition of dynamic multimodal (facial, bodily, vocal) expressions and one for recognition of facial micro expressions. Initially, 154 participants enrolled in the study, 72 also took part in the follow-up. The trainee psychotherapists were moderately better at recognizing multimodal expressions, and slightly better at recognizing facial micro expressions, than the control group at the first test occasion. However, mixed multilevel modeling indicated that the ERA change trajectories for the two groups differed significantly. While the control group improved in their ability to recognize multimodal emotional expressions from pretest to follow-up, the trainee psychotherapists did not. Both groups improved their micro expression recognition accuracy, but the slope for the control group was significantly steeper than the trainee psychotherapists’. These results suggest that psychotherapy education and clinical training do not always contribute to improved emotion recognition accuracy beyond what could be expected due to time or other factors. Possible reasons for that finding as well as implications for the psychotherapy education are discussed.  

National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221021 (URN)10.7717/peerj.16235 (DOI)001177956500001 ()2-s2.0-85180968441 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2013.0130Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2013-02727
Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Döllinger, L., Högman, L., Laukka, P., Fischer, H. & Hau, S. (2023). Trainee psychotherapists’ emotion recognition accuracy improves after training: emotion recognition training as a tool for psychotherapy education. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, Article ID 1188634.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trainee psychotherapists’ emotion recognition accuracy improves after training: emotion recognition training as a tool for psychotherapy education
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1188634Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Psychotherapists’ emotional and empathic competencies have a positive influence on psychotherapy outcome and alliance. However, it is doubtful whether psychotherapy education in itself leads to improvements in trainee psychotherapists’ emotion recognition accuracy (ERA), which is an essential part of these competencies.

Methods: In a randomized, controlled, double-blind study (N = 68), we trained trainee psychotherapists (57% psychodynamic therapy and 43% cognitive behavioral therapy) to detect non-verbal emotional expressions in others using standardized computerized trainings – one for multimodal emotion recognition accuracy and one for micro expression recognition accuracy – and compared their results to an active control group one week after the training (n = 60) and at the one-year follow up (n = 55). The participants trained once weekly during a three-week period. As outcome measures, we used a multimodal emotion recognition accuracy task, a micro expression recognition accuracy task and an emotion recognition accuracy task for verbal and non-verbal (combined) emotional expressions in medical settings.

Results: The results of mixed multilevel analyses suggest that the multimodal emotion recognition accuracy training led to significantly steeper increases than the other two conditions from pretest to the posttest one week after the last training session. When comparing the pretest to follow-up differences in slopes, the superiority of the multimodal training group was still detectable in the unimodal audio modality and the unimodal video modality (in comparison to the control training group), but not when considering the multimodal audio-video modality or the total score of the multimodal emotion recognition accuracy measure. The micro expression training group showed a significantly steeper change trajectory from pretest to posttest compared to the control training group, but not compared to the multimodal training group. However, the effect vanished again until the one-year follow-up. There were no differences in change trajectories for the outcome measure about emotion recognition accuracy in medical settings.

Discussion: We conclude that trainee psychotherapists’ emotion recognition accuracy can be effectively trained, especially multimodal emotion recognition accuracy, and suggest that the changes in unimodal emotion recognition accuracy (audio-only and video-only) are long-lasting. Implications of these findings for the psychotherapy education are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
emotion recognition accuracy, trainee psychotherapists, emotion in psychotherapy, multimodal emotion recognition, micro expression recognition, training emotion recognition, psychotherapy education
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-221019 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1188634 (DOI)001041808800001 ()2-s2.0-85166672073 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Marcus and Amalia Wallenberg Foundation, MAW 2013.0130
Available from: 2023-09-13 Created: 2023-09-13 Last updated: 2024-05-24Bibliographically approved
Lin, T., Pehlivanoglu, D., Ziaei, M., Liu, P., Woods, A. J., Feifel, D., . . . Ebner, N. C. (2022). Age-Related Differences in Amygdala Activation Associated With Face Trustworthiness but No Evidence of Oxytocin Modulation. Frontiers in Psychology, 13, Article ID 838642.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age-Related Differences in Amygdala Activation Associated With Face Trustworthiness but No Evidence of Oxytocin Modulation
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2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 13, article id 838642Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The amygdala has been shown to be responsive to face trustworthiness. While older adults typically give higher face trustworthiness ratings than young adults, a direct link between amygdala response and age-related differences in face trustworthiness evaluation has not yet been confirmed. Additionally, there is a possible modulatory role of the neuropeptide oxytocin in face trustworthiness evaluation, but the results are mixed and effects unexplored in aging. To address these research gaps, young, and older adults were randomly assigned to oxytocin or placebo self-administration via a nasal spray before rating faces on trustworthiness while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging. There was no overall age-group difference in face trustworthiness ratings, but older compared to young participants gave higher trustworthiness ratings to ambivalently untrustworthy-looking faces. In both age groups, lower face trustworthiness ratings were associated with higher left amygdala activity. A comparable negative linear association was observed in right amygdala but only among young participants. Also, in the right amygdala, lower and higher, compared to moderate, face trustworthiness ratings were associated with greater right amygdala activity (i.e., positive quadratic (U-shaped) association) for both age groups. Neither the behavioral nor the brain effects were modulated by a single dose of intranasal oxytocin administration, however. These results suggest dampened response to faces with lower trustworthiness among older compared to young adults, supporting the notion of reduced sensitivity to cues of untrustworthiness in aging. The findings also extend evidence of an age-related positivity effect to the evaluation of face trustworthiness.

Keywords
face trustworthiness, aging, amygdala, fMRI, oxytocin
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-206783 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2022.838642 (DOI)000821892300001 ()2-s2.0-85134075420 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by the University of Florida Clinical and Translational Science pilot award (NIH/NCATS, UL1 TR000064), the Scientific Research Network on Decision Neuroscience and Aging pilot award (NIH/NIA, R24 AG039350), the National Institute on Aging grants R01AG059809, R01AG057764, and R01AG072658, the Florida Department of Health Ed and Ethel Moore Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program grant 22A12, as well as the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the Department of Psychology, the Center for Cognitive Aging and Memory, and the Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center at the University of Florida. A portion of this work was performed in the McKnight Brain Institute at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory’s AMRIS Facility, supported by the National Science Foundation Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-1157490 and the State of Florida.

Available from: 2022-06-27 Created: 2022-06-27 Last updated: 2022-08-24Bibliographically approved
Olivo, G., Lövdén, M., Manzouri, A., Terlau, L., Jenner, B., Jafari, A., . . . Månsson, K. N. T. (2022). Estimated gray matter volume rapidly changes after a short motor task. Cerebral Cortex, 32(19), 4356-4369, Article ID bhab488.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Estimated gray matter volume rapidly changes after a short motor task
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2022 (English)In: Cerebral Cortex, ISSN 1047-3211, E-ISSN 1460-2199, Vol. 32, no 19, p. 4356-4369, article id bhab488Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Skill learning induces changes in estimates of gray matter volume (GMV) in the human brain, commonly detectable with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Rapid changes in GMV estimates while executing tasks may however confound between- and within-subject differences. Fluctuations in arterial blood flow are proposed to underlie this apparent task-related tissue plasticity. To test this hypothesis, we acquired multiple repetitions of structural T1-weighted and functional blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI measurements from 51 subjects performing a finger-tapping task (FTT; á 2 min) repeatedly for 30–60 min. Estimated GMV was decreased in motor regions during FTT compared with rest. Motor-related BOLD signal changes did not overlap nor correlate with GMV changes. Nearly simultaneous BOLD signals cannot fully explain task-induced changes in T1-weighted images. These sensitive and behavior-related GMV changes pose serious questions to reproducibility across studies, and morphological investigations during skill learning can also open new avenues on how to study rapid brain plasticity.

Keywords
finger tapping, motor training, MRI, plasticity, skill learning
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-205122 (URN)10.1093/cercor/bhab488 (DOI)000792146800001 ()35136959 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85139353043 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-01 Created: 2022-06-01 Last updated: 2022-10-28Bibliographically approved
Månsson, K. N. T., Waschke, L., Manzouri, A., Furmark, T., Fischer, H. & Garrett, D. D. (2022). Moment-to-Moment Brain Signal Variability Reliably Predicts Psychiatric Treatment Outcome. Biological Psychiatry, 91(7), 658-666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Moment-to-Moment Brain Signal Variability Reliably Predicts Psychiatric Treatment Outcome
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2022 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 91, no 7, p. 658-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Biomarkers of psychiatric treatment response remain elusive. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown promise, but low reliability has limited the utility of typical fMRI measures (e.g., average brain signal) as harbingers of treatment success. Notably, although historically considered a source of noise, temporal brain signal variability continues to gain momentum as a sensitive and reliable indicator of individual differences in neural efficacy, yet has not been examined in relation to psychiatric treatment outcomes.

Methods: A total of 45 patients with social anxiety disorder were scanned twice (11 weeks apart) using simple task-based and resting-state fMRI to capture moment-to-moment neural variability. After fMRI test-retest, patients underwent a 9-week cognitive behavioral therapy. Multivariate modeling and reliability-based cross-validation were used to perform brain-based prediction of treatment outcomes.

Results: Task-based brain signal variability was the strongest contributor in a treatment outcome prediction model (total rACTUAL,PREDICTED = 0.77), outperforming self-reports, resting-state neural variability, and standard mean-based measures of neural activity. Notably, task-based brain signal variability showed excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.80), even with a task length less than 3 minutes long.

Conclusions: Rather than a source of undesirable noise, moment-to-moment fMRI signal variability may instead serve as a highly reliable and efficient prognostic indicator of clinical outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
CBT, fMRI signal variability, prediction, resting state, social anxiety disorder
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202950 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2021.09.026 (DOI)000819789200008 ()34961621 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85121843325 (Scopus ID)
Note

This work was supported by the Swedish Research Council (Grant Nos. 2018-06729 and 2016-02228 [to KM and TF]) and the Swedish Brain Foundation (Grant No. FO-2016-0106 [to KM and TF]). DG and KM were supported partially by an Emmy Noether Programme grant from the German Research Foundation (to DG) and by the Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research in Berlin.

Available from: 2022-03-18 Created: 2022-03-18 Last updated: 2022-08-24Bibliographically approved
Månsson, K., Waschke, L., Manzouri, A., Furmark, T., Fischer, H. & Garrett, D. D. (2022). P131. Moment-To-Moment Brain Signal Variability Reliably Predicts Psychiatric Treatment Outcome. Biological Psychiatry, 91(9), S140-S140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>P131. Moment-To-Moment Brain Signal Variability Reliably Predicts Psychiatric Treatment Outcome
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2022 (English)In: Biological Psychiatry, ISSN 0006-3223, E-ISSN 1873-2402, Vol. 91, no 9, p. S140-S140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Månsson et al., Biological Psychiatry, In press:

Biomarkers of psychiatric treatment response remain elusive. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has shown promise, but low reliability has limited the utility of typical fMRI measures (e.g., average brain signal) as harbingers of treatment success. Notably, although historically considered a source of “noise,” temporal brain signal variability continues to gain momentum as a sensitive and reliable indicator of individual differences in neural efficacy, yet has not been examined in relation to psychiatric treatment outcomes.

Methods: Forty-five patients with social anxiety disorder were scanned twice (11 weeks apart) using simple task-based and resting-state fMRI to capture moment-to-moment neural variability. After fMRI test-retest, patients underwent a 9-week cognitive-behavioral therapy. Multivariate modeling and reliability-based cross-validation were utilized to perform brain-based prediction of treatment outcomes.

Results: Task-based brain signal variability was the strongest contributor in a treatment outcome prediction model (total r[ACTUAL,PREDICTED]=.77) - outperforming self-reports, resting-state neural variability, and standard mean-based measures of neural activity. Notably, task-based brain signal variability showed excellent test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient=.80), even with a task length less than 3 minutes long.

Conclusions: Rather than a source of undesirable “noise”, moment-to-moment fMRI signal variability may instead serve as a highly reliable and efficient prognostic indicator of clinical outcome.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
fMRI Signal Variability, Treatment Outcome Prediction, Social Anxiety Disorder, CBT, Resting-State
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-208112 (URN)10.1016/j.biopsych.2022.02.365 (DOI)
Note

Swedish Research Council (2018-06729, and 2016-02228); Swedish Brain Foundation (FO-2016-0106); Emmy Noether Programme grant from the German Research Foundation; Max Planck UCL Centre for Computational Psychiatry and Ageing Research in Berlin.

Available from: 2022-08-18 Created: 2022-08-18 Last updated: 2022-10-18Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6710-1744

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