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Ahrne, Göran
Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Ahrne, G. (2021). The construction of social bonds: a relational theory of globalization, organizations and society. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The construction of social bonds: a relational theory of globalization, organizations and society
2021 (English)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2021. p. 160
Series
New horizons in organization studies
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-199516 (URN)9781789909449 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-12-09 Created: 2021-12-09 Last updated: 2021-12-10Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G. (2021). The significance of social bonds. In: Håkon Leiulfsrud; Peter Sohlberg (Ed.), Constructing social research objects: Constructuionism in research practice (pp. 84-98). Leiden: Brill Nijhoff
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The significance of social bonds
2021 (English)In: Constructing social research objects: Constructuionism in research practice / [ed] Håkon Leiulfsrud; Peter Sohlberg, Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2021, p. 84-98Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2021
Series
Studies in critical social scieences, ISSN 1573-4234 ; 185
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-199515 (URN)10.1163/9789004450028_007 (DOI)978-90-04-35158-5 (ISBN)978-90-04-45002-8 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-12-09 Created: 2021-12-09 Last updated: 2021-12-10Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G. & Sörbom, A. (2020). Flawed Globalization: Why Traditional Political Organizations Have Problems Forming Transnational Meta- Organizations. Stockholm: Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE), Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flawed Globalization: Why Traditional Political Organizations Have Problems Forming Transnational Meta- Organizations
2020 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Departing from an organizational perspective and using the cases of Socialist International and four European trade unions, this paper illustrates why political parties and trade unions have difficulty acting globally. The analysis shows that international or transnational organizations for national parties or trade unions are established as meta-organizations, and herein lies the key to explaining their problems in becoming global actors. The national embeddedness of their members results in broad agendas and quests for national solutions, which divides and weakens leadership. Comparing these meta-organizations to a more successful global political organization, Amnesty International, reveals that its organization is quite the opposite: a centralized leadership, a narrow agenda, not working for the immediate interests of its members or finding solutions to the issues it raises. The paper concludes that if this form of organization is necessary in global politics then there is little room for political parties and unions on a global arena.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE), Stockholm University, 2020. p. 30
Series
SCORE rapportserie, ISSN 1404-5052 ; 2020:3
Keywords
Globalization, Politics, Trade Unions, Political Parties, Amnesty International
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-179887 (URN)978-91-88833-08-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-03-12 Created: 2020-03-12 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G. & Rostami, A. (2019). How is ‘organized crime’ organized?. In: Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson (Ed.), Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organiation in social life (pp. 253-270). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How is ‘organized crime’ organized?
2019 (English)In: Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organiation in social life / [ed] Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 253-270Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we explore the usefulness of applying the idea of partial organization as one way of mitigating the confusion surrounding the notion of organized crime. We examine three types of collectivities that are usually seen as examples of organized crime: outlaw motorcycle gangs (OMCs), street gangs, and mafias. When we examine the occurrence of organizational elements, we find substantial differences among these three cases not only in the amount of their organization, but also in the ways in which they are organized. A few multinational outlaw motorcycle gangs have gradually been able to form strong formal organizations containing all organizational elements. For a mafia, the situation is quite the opposite. Because its embeddedness in kinship relationships provides cohesion and protection, it needs little organization. Through its strong kinship ties, a mafia has access to several functional equivalents to the organizational elements one can find in OMCs. In street gangs the appearance of organizational elements varies among the gangs, and they rarely have more than a few elements at any one time. One obstacle for the organization of street gangs is their local embeddedness and limited duration, which loosen the boundaries of the gang.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019
Keywords
organized crime, outlaw motorcycle gangs, mafias, street gangs, kinship, friendship, network, project, partial organization
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Criminology; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177007 (URN)10.1017/9781108604994.012 (DOI)9781108474986 (ISBN)9781108604994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G. & Brunsson, N. (2019). More and less organization. In: Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson (Ed.), Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life (pp. 421-441). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>More and less organization
2019 (English)In: Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life / [ed] Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 421-441Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The modern world is highly organized. Much organization occurs within formal organizations, to the extent that the extensive study of formal organizations has overshadowed other forms of organization. But organization happens not only within, but also outside the context of formal organizations. We define ‘organization’ as a decided order, and we see some decisions as more fundamental than others and have dubbed these decisions ‘organizational elements’. We distinguish five such elements: membership, rules, monitoring, sanctions, and hierarchy. Individuals or organizations can use organizational elements to organize other individuals or organizations, even if they do not belong to the same organization. But organizers do not necessarily use all elements, and all settings are not organized by all elements. In fact, many social settings are only partially organized – even formal organizations. We use the concepts of social relationships and formal organization to specify what we mean by organization and organizational elements and compare organizational elements with other ways in which social relationships develop. We describe the differences between organization and other origins of social order such as institutions and networks. The chapter ends with an overview of the following chapters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019
Keywords
prial organization, formal organizations, globalization, organizational elements, organization theory, institution, network
National Category
Business Administration Sociology
Research subject
Business Administration; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177004 (URN)10.1017/9781108604994.019 (DOI)9781108474986 (ISBN)9781108604994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G. & Brunsson, N. (Eds.). (2019). Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life
2019 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The book explores how various social settings are partially organized even when they do not form part of a formal organization. It also shows how even formal organizations may be only partially organized. Professors Göran Ahrne and Nils Brunsson first established the concept of partial organization in 2011 and in doing so opened up a groundbreaking new field of organizational analysis. An academic community has since developed around the concept, and Ahrne and Brunsson have edited this collection to reflect the current state of inquiry in this burgeoning subject and to set an agenda for future research. Its chapters explain how organization is a salient feature in many social settings, including markets, interfirm networks, social movements, criminal gangs, internet communication and family life. Organization theory is much more relevant for the understanding of social processes than previously assumed. This book provides a new understanding of many social phenomena and opens up new fields for organizational analysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019. p. 443
Keywords
Organisational Sociology, Organisation Studies, Management, Sociology
National Category
Business Administration Sociology
Research subject
Business Administration; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177010 (URN)10.1017/9781108604994 (DOI)9781108474986 (ISBN)9781108604994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G. & Brunsson, N. (2019). Organization unbound. In: Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson (Ed.), Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life (pp. 3-36). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organization unbound
2019 (English)In: Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life / [ed] Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 3-36Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The modern world is highly organized. Much organization occurs within formal organizations, to the extent that the extensive study of formal organizations has overshadowed other forms of organization. But organization happens not only within, but also outside the context of formal organizations. We define ‘organization’ as a decided order, and we see some decisions as more fundamental than others and have dubbed these decisions ‘organizational elements’. We distinguish five such elements: membership, rules, monitoring, sanctions, and hierarchy. Individuals or organizations can use organizational elements to organize other individuals or organizations, even if they do not belong to the same organization. But organizers do not necessarily use all elements, and all settings are not organized by all elements. In fact, many social settings are only partially organized – even formal organizations. We use the concepts of social relationships and formal organization to specify what we mean by organization and organizational elements, and compare organizational elements with other ways in which social relationships develop. We describe the differences between organization and other origins of social order such as institutions and networks. The chapter ends with an overview of the following chapters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019
Keywords
partial organization, decision, social relationship, institution, network, membership, rules, monitoring, sanctions, hierarchy
National Category
Business Administration Sociology
Research subject
Business Administration; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177003 (URN)10.1017/9781108604994.001 (DOI)9781108474986 (ISBN)9781108604994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G. (2019). Organizing intimacy. In: Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson (Ed.), Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life (pp. 235-252). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing intimacy
2019 (English)In: Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life / [ed] Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 235-252Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite strong emotions and a high density of communication, intimacy does not preclude organization. Intimate relationships can often be recognized as partially organized. In this chapter I examine three intimate relationships – families, kinship, and friendship – in order to investigate how the variation in combinations of organizational elements can be explained by the core component of love in each type of relationship. In examining the appearance of organizational elements in intimate relationships, one can see considerable differences among them, not only in their degree of organization, but also in the elements that are present. There is a connection between the elements that appear in a relationship and the emotional content. But there are also differences within the same type of relationship in how much and in which ways they are organized. An investigation of organizational elements in intimate relationships also provides an awareness of the limits of organization and why intimate relationships remain partially organized. A broadening of the analysis examining connections between states and intimate relationships demonstrates why states can use membership as an organizational element only to a limited extent. States are extremely organized in many respects, yet they are only partially organized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019
Keywords
intimacy, family, kinship, friendship, states, love, organization, decisions, citizenship
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177006 (URN)10.1017/9781108604994.011 (DOI)9781108474986 (ISBN)9781108604994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G., Castillo, D. & Roumbanis, L. (2019). Queues: tensions between institution and organization. In: Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson (Ed.), Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life (pp. 177-188). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Queues: tensions between institution and organization
2019 (English)In: Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life / [ed] Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 177-188Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The formation of queues is an institution: it is created and managed largely by the emergent norms of those in the queue. Research on queues has demonstrated that it is more and more common for organizations to intervene in the ordering of queues. In this chapter we investigate why and how queues are organized and the tensions that arise when a strong institution becomes the subject of partial organization. As an institution, the idea of how to form a queue has strong legitimacy resting on commonly accepted values of equality and fairness. The fact that a queue is organized with one or several organizational elements does not necessarily mean that the queue as an institution is replaced by organization; on the contrary, organizational decisions may support the queue as an institution. In other cases, however, organization is a challenge to the legitimacy of the queue; instead it is the organization that uses its power to further its own interest in selecting the preferred customers from a larger number of people standing in a line. When an organization decides the order in which people are admitted, little remains of the institution of the queue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019
Keywords
queues, seriality, institution, organization, monitoring, rules, norms, hierarchy, decisions
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177005 (URN)10.1017/9781108604994.008 (DOI)9781108474986 (ISBN)9781108604994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Ahrne, G., Brunsson, N. & Kerwer, D. (2019). The partial organization of international relations: International organizations as meta-organizations. In: Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson (Ed.), Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life (pp. 390-418). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The partial organization of international relations: International organizations as meta-organizations
2019 (English)In: Organization outside organizations: The abundance of partial organization in social life / [ed] Göran Ahrne, Nils Brunsson, Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019, p. 390-418Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter we argue that the key to an understanding of international governmental organizations (IGOs) is to conceptualize them not as standard forms of organizations with individuals as their members, but as meta-organizations comprising organized actors as members. Meta-organizations are paradoxical constructions: autonomous actors with autonomous actors as members. Organizational elements cannot be considered in isolation in meta-organizations; their combination are key factors; therefore meta-organizations are often partially organized. IGOs are permanently competing for actorhood with their member states and this competition has far-reaching implications for to what extent they can make use of all organizational elements. Using one element may require the avoidance of other elements or certain forms of decision-making. This helps to explain why IGOs have problems achieving co-ordinated organizational action and why they are less powerful actors than standard organizations are. Yet IGOs are strong in other respects. The most important organizational element in IGOs is membership. The strengths of IGOs can be understood in relation to their creation, their expansion, and their long-term influence on their members.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2019
Keywords
international organizations, meta-organizations, international relations, membership, states, decision, hypocrisy, partial organization, United Nations, European Union, World Bank
National Category
Business Administration Sociology
Research subject
Business Administration; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177008 (URN)10.1017/9781108604994.018 (DOI)9781108474986 (ISBN)9781108604994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-12-12 Created: 2019-12-12 Last updated: 2022-10-27Bibliographically approved
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