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Leivestad Høyer, HegeORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2940-8304
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Schober, E. & Leivestad Høyer, H. (2022). Past the canal: An anthropology of maritime passages. History and Anthropology, 33(2), 183-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Past the canal: An anthropology of maritime passages
2022 (English)In: History and Anthropology, ISSN 0275-7206, E-ISSN 1477-2612, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 183-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2022
National Category
History and Archaeology Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-212934 (URN)10.1080/02757206.2022.2066093 (DOI)000788526800001 ()2-s2.0-85128806952 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-01-09 Created: 2023-01-09 Last updated: 2023-01-09Bibliographically approved
Leivestad Høyer, H. (2022). The shipping container. History and Anthropology, 33(2), 202-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The shipping container
2022 (English)In: History and Anthropology, ISSN 0275-7206, E-ISSN 1477-2612, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 202-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When the Ever Given became stuck in the Suez Canal, the megaship was carrying 18,300 rectangular, steel boxes on her back. In the weeks and months after the incident, the concealed contents of the shipping containers – stuck in legal limbo – captured global attention. Technologically developed in the years after the Second World War, the standardized shipping container has featured as one of the protagonists of the transformations in international trade. But the container’s logic of concealment and transaction has made ‘the box’ a common figure also in popular culture and social theory. This essay interrogates the shipping container’s multiple repertoires by focussing on containers at work. By tracing how the shipping container moves through the port infrastructure this essay takes us from the Suez Canal towards another central maritime passageway: the Strait of Gibraltar. This essay reflects on the different scales at which the shipping container functions in the port: from heavy materiality to abstracted codes and units of measurement.

Keywords
Shipping container, ports, labour, materiality
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-204387 (URN)10.1080/02757206.2022.2066094 (DOI)000784098400001 ()2-s2.0-85129489650 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-16 Created: 2022-05-16 Last updated: 2022-08-22Bibliographically approved
Leivestad Høyer, H. (2021). Captured at Sea Review [Review]. Society and Space
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Captured at Sea Review
2021 (English)In: Society and Space, ISSN 1472-3433Article, book review (Other academic) In press
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Research subject
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-199716 (URN)
Available from: 2021-12-13 Created: 2021-12-13 Last updated: 2023-04-26
Høyer Leivestad, H. & Markkula, J. (2021). Inside container economies. Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology (89), 1-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inside container economies
2021 (English)In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, no 89, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This introduction proposes an anthropology of global cargo circulation by placing the maritime shipping industry at the center of global capitalism. With container economies we refer to the maritime global circulation of cargo that is sustained by an undervalued labor force, dependent upon unstable logistics infrastructures and driven by speculative capital. Container economies, we argue, are produced by adding, moving, and destroying value through the maritime supply chain. In this introduction, we reflect upon the implications of containerization and its wider consequences for logistics labor. We argue that maritime logistics and labor is best understood by taking into account their wider networks of dependency expressed through kinship relations, ethnicity and coexisting regimes of value.

Keywords
cargo mobility, global trade, labor, logistics, maritime shipping
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-192200 (URN)10.3167/fcl.2021.890101 (DOI)000620143300001 ()
Available from: 2021-04-15 Created: 2021-04-15 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Høyer Leivestad, H. (2021). Kinship on the waterfront: logistics labour in a global port. Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, 27(3), 518-533
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Kinship on the waterfront: logistics labour in a global port
2021 (English)In: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute, ISSN 1359-0987, E-ISSN 1467-9655, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 518-533Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines how kinship forms a contested element of labour under capitalist distribution. The focus of the article is on a thriving Spanish container port where the dockworker collective has been steadily growing since the multinational companies first arrived in the 1970s. In the wake of containerization – a standardized system of freight transport based on the intermodal shipping container – dock work has been revalued and become attractive in an area otherwise characterized by high unemployment rates and below-average salaries. Drawing on ethnographic research, the article analyses how unionized dockworkers are met with stigmatization from the general public and criticized for their intergenerational access to ‘container capital’. The article contributes to current anthropological debates around the role of labour under global capitalism by tracing the links between kinship and labour in the making of a global port.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-196172 (URN)10.1111/1467-9655.13548 (DOI)000681055700004 ()
Available from: 2021-09-07 Created: 2021-09-07 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Leivestad, H. H. & Schober, E. (2021). Politics of scale: Colossal containerships and the crisis in global shipping. Anthropology Today, 37(3), 3-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Politics of scale: Colossal containerships and the crisis in global shipping
2021 (English)In: Anthropology Today, ISSN 0268-540X, E-ISSN 1467-8322, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 3-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses overcapacity and crisis in global shipping through the case of the HMM Algeciras, the world's largest containership inaugurated in 2020. When she left the South Korean shipyard where she was built, the HMM Algeciras (with a size of two soccer fields) could carry 24,000 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) across the world's oceans. By following the mega-containership's links to two South Korean shipping companies, Hyundai Merchant Marine and Hanjin Shipping, and her connections to a southern European port, the authors unpack some of the current flip sides of global maritime shipping. In this article, the authors argue that the promise of profit and endless growth, which has led to overcapacity in global maritime shipping, is spurred on by what they call ‘false economies of scale’. Claims of the future profitability of colossal containerships are, they argue, state-driven political performances of scale.

National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-195759 (URN)10.1111/1467-8322.12650 (DOI)000657814100002 ()
Available from: 2021-08-26 Created: 2021-08-26 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Høyer Leivestad, H. (2021). Who cares about the cargo? Container economies in a European transshipment port. Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology (89), 52-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Who cares about the cargo? Container economies in a European transshipment port
2021 (English)In: Focaal: European Journal of Anthropology, ISSN 0920-1297, E-ISSN 1558-5263, no 89, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While the shipping container has been hyped as the most potent symbol of global trade, it is simultaneously a unit of measure, a medium of exchange, and a material abstraction of heterogeneous use value. This article places the container and its anonymized cargo as part of the everyday logistics of commodity circulation in the Spanish Port of Algeciras Bay-a transshipment hub at the Strait of Gibraltar. By disentangling the shipping container's multiple repertoires, this article focuses on how the shipping container transforms and converts the value of cargo and mediates logistics labor in the port.

Keywords
logistics, mobility, ports, shipping containers, Spain
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-192201 (URN)10.3167/fcl.2021.890105 (DOI)000620143300005 ()
Available from: 2021-04-15 Created: 2021-04-15 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Høyer Leivestad, H. & Olsson, E. (2020). A 20 dollar note: 'success stories' of Swedish business actors with Iranian origin. Social Identities, 26(2), 219-232
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 20 dollar note: 'success stories' of Swedish business actors with Iranian origin
2020 (English)In: Social Identities, ISSN 1350-4630, E-ISSN 1363-0296, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 219-232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the career narratives of entrepreneurs with migrant background in the Swedish business sector. Statistics show that the proportion of individuals with a migrant background who reach so-called top-positions in Swedish society is in general low. Migrants with Iranian background is an exception as many of them have reached high positions as professionals in business corporations and themselves established high-profile businesses in Sweden. Based on in-depth interviews with entrepreneurs and managers with Iranian origin, we will in this article look at how their background is made relevant when reflecting upon professional success and failure. The article is concerned with their exceptional professional achievements and, in particular, the individuals' positioning in relation to their 'society of migration', their society of origin, and the social networks are embedded in as migrants with an Iranian origin. The article shows how narratives of success tend to emphasize the struggles of a 'lonely fighter' while at the same time dismiss discrimination as an explanatory factor. The entrepreneurs' success stories nevertheless focus on how one's career path as innovators and 'agents of social change' is intimately linked with a migrant past and experience.

Keywords
Success narratives, entrepreneurship, professional careers, Iranians, Sweden
National Category
Sociology Social Anthropology International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-178616 (URN)10.1080/13504630.2019.1711049 (DOI)000506111700001 ()
Available from: 2020-02-25 Created: 2020-02-25 Last updated: 2024-03-13Bibliographically approved
Leivestad Høyer, H. & Elisabeth, S. (2020). På logistikkjedens bunn. Klassekampen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>På logistikkjedens bunn
2020 (Norwegian)In: Klassekampen, ISSN 0805-3839Article in journal, News item (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Social Anthropology
Research subject
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-186869 (URN)
Note

Publicerad 2020-04-21. 

Available from: 2020-11-25 Created: 2020-11-25 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Høyer Leivestad, H. (2020). The Hidden Lives of Mobile Dwellings: On Static Wheels and Classed Housing. City & Society, 32(2), 1-4
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Hidden Lives of Mobile Dwellings: On Static Wheels and Classed Housing
2020 (English)In: City & Society, ISSN 0893-0465, E-ISSN 1548-744X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 1-4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-182953 (URN)10.1111/CISO.12273 (DOI)000560530100036 ()
Available from: 2020-07-09 Created: 2020-07-09 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2940-8304

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