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Publications (10 of 46) Show all publications
Thanem, T. & Elraz, H. (2022). From stress to resistance: Challenging the capitalist underpinnings of mental unhealth in work and organizations. International journal of management reviews (Print), 24(4), 577-598
Open this publication in new window or tab >>From stress to resistance: Challenging the capitalist underpinnings of mental unhealth in work and organizations
2022 (English)In: International journal of management reviews (Print), ISSN 1460-8545, E-ISSN 1468-2370, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 577-598Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The worldwide spread of work-related mental unhealth suggests that this is a major problem affecting organizations and employees on a global scale. In this paper, we therefore provide a thematic review of the literatures that address this issue in management and organization studies (MOS) and related fields. While these literatures examine how employee mental health is affected by organizational and occupational structures and managed by organizations and employees, they have paid relatively little attention to the capitalist labour relations which underpin the unhealthy conditions of contemporary working life. They have paid even less attention to how these conditions may be resisted. To help future scholarship in MOS challenge this state of affairs, we draw on some of the most basic but central notions of exploitation, alienation and resistance in classic and current critiques of capitalism, optimistic that this may help strengthen the field's capacity to confront mental unhealth in settings of work and organization.

National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-204512 (URN)10.1111/ijmr.12293 (DOI)000782477000001 ()2-s2.0-85128237933 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-09 Created: 2022-05-09 Last updated: 2022-10-25Bibliographically approved
Thanem, T. & Wallenberg, L. (2021). The humanities are not our patient. Management Learning, 52(3), 364-373, Article ID 1350507620986931.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The humanities are not our patient
2021 (English)In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 52, no 3, p. 364-373, article id 1350507620986931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

When inviting contributions to a special issue of this journal titled ‘Management Learning and the Unsettled Humanities’ the guest editors did not simply encourage contributors to explore possibilities ‘for reciprocal integration’ between the two realms. Stressing that ‘the humanities . . . [are] facing a complex crisis on their own’, they stated that ‘the humanities . . . need to be enriched, nuanced, and critiqued through . . . the ideas and perspectives of organisational research’. While we may agree that all is not well in the humanities and share their scepticism towards ‘just prescribing the value of the humanities to ameliorate the ills of management education’, we are less confident that the humanities need management learning as much as we need them. As long as learning and scholarship in management and organisation studies continues to suffer from too much management, we doubt that ‘management education [may help] . . . unsettl[e] . . . the human within the . . . humanistic . . . disciplines’. Rather, students of management and organisation still have plenty to learn from the humanities, not least from its rich portrayal of human lives. It is on this basis we draw the conclusion that the humanities are not our patient.

Keywords
Crisis, management learning, the humanities, literary writing, affect, Deleuze
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-191787 (URN)10.1177/1350507620986931 (DOI)000619961100001 ()
Available from: 2021-04-27 Created: 2021-04-27 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Munro, I. & Thanem, T. (2020). Care without Leaders: The Collective Powers of Affective Leadership. In: Leah Tomkins (Ed.), Paradox and Power in Caring Leadership: Critical and Philosophical Reflections (pp. 198-209). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Care without Leaders: The Collective Powers of Affective Leadership
2020 (English)In: Paradox and Power in Caring Leadership: Critical and Philosophical Reflections / [ed] Leah Tomkins, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020, p. 198-209Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, 2020
Series
New Horizons in Leadership Studies Ser.
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-185503 (URN)9781788975490 (ISBN)9781788975506 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01523
Available from: 2020-09-23 Created: 2020-09-23 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Rhodes, C., Munro, I., Thanem, T. & Pullen, A. (2020). Dissensus! Radical Democracy and Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics, 164(4), 627-632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dissensus! Radical Democracy and Business Ethics
2020 (English)In: Journal of Business Ethics, ISSN 0167-4544, E-ISSN 1573-0697, Vol. 164, no 4, p. 627-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this introductory essay, we outline the relationship between political dissensus and radical democracy, focusing especially on how such a politics might inform the study of business ethics. This politics is located historically in the failure of liberal democracy to live up to its promise, as well as the deleterious response to that from reactionary populism, strong-man authoritarianism, and exploitative capitalism. In the context of these political vicissitudes, we turn to radical democracy as a form of contestation that offers hope in an affirmative, inclusive and sustainable alternative. On this basis we introduce the papers in the special issue as a collective exploration of the ethics and politics of radical democracy as manifesting in dissensus and the subversion of corporate and elite power by alternative democratic practices and realities.

Keywords
Dissensus, Politics, Radical democracy
National Category
Economics and Business Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-183606 (URN)10.1007/s10551-019-04405-3 (DOI)000544587400001 ()
Available from: 2020-07-22 Created: 2020-07-22 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Wallenberg, L. & Thanem, T. (2018). Beyond Fashion’s Alluring Surface: Connecting the Fashion Image and the Lived Realities of Female Workers in the Fashion Industry. In: Agnes Bolsø; Stine H. Bang Svendsen; Siri Øyslebø Sørensen (Ed.), Symbols and Organizational Practice: The Gendered Dynamics of Powers (pp. 72-84). Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond Fashion’s Alluring Surface: Connecting the Fashion Image and the Lived Realities of Female Workers in the Fashion Industry
2018 (English)In: Symbols and Organizational Practice: The Gendered Dynamics of Powers / [ed] Agnes Bolsø; Stine H. Bang Svendsen; Siri Øyslebø Sørensen, Routledge, 2018, p. 72-84Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many western countries are increasingly dependent on the wealth generated by fashion companies while emerging economies such as Bangladesh and Vietnam are dependent on the jobs produced through the manufacturing of garments for fashion companies. And while women in western countries remain the main targets of fashion, its artefacts and images cannot be produced without the labour of underpaid women – whether sweatshop garment workers or under-aged models, many of whom are exploited and exchangeable. This chapter connects the separate worlds of fashion image and the reality of textile and modelling labour by exploring how fashion imagery is imbricated in the organization of its production process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2018
Series
Routledge research in gender and society, ISSN 2155-5702
Keywords
fashion, allure, sexual and economic exploitation, sweatshops, fashion industry, fashion models, fashion photography, textile industry, Bangladesh, gravity, tragedy
National Category
Cultural Studies
Research subject
Fashion Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-182659 (URN)10.4324/9781315308951-5 (DOI)9781138233706 (ISBN)9781315308951 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-06-17 Created: 2020-06-17 Last updated: 2023-03-03Bibliographically approved
Munro, I. & Thanem, T. (2018). Deleuze and the deterritorialization of strategy. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 53, 69-78
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Deleuze and the deterritorialization of strategy
2018 (English)In: Critical Perspectives on Accounting, ISSN 1045-2354, E-ISSN 1095-9955, Vol. 53, p. 69-78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mainstream ideas of strategy are aimed at gaining and maintaining power. In contrast, the work of Deleuze and Guattari is directed against the concentration of corporate and state power and capitalist forms of exploitation. Their writings provide us with valuable concepts for understanding the workings of strategy and exploring creative ways through which strategy can be re-evaluated and subverted. This paper develops three of Deleuze and Guattari’s main concepts for understanding the strategic movements within contemporary capitalism: i) nomadic strategy, ii) deterritorialization, and iii) the occupation of smooth space. It then uses these concepts to explain the rise of new strategies in the domains of the news media, the music industry and the Occupy movement, which attempt to subvert corporate forms of exploitation. This radically challenges existing processual notions of strategy that have an underlying conservative bias, as well as other popular conceptions of strategy like Porter’s management of “barriers to entry”.

Keywords
Strategy, Power, Resistance, Deleuze, Guattari, Deterritorialization, Smooth space, Nomadism
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-185500 (URN)10.1016/j.cpa.2017.03.012 (DOI)000437994700006 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-01523
Available from: 2020-09-23 Created: 2020-09-23 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Munro, I. & Thanem, T. (2018). The Ethics of Affective Leadership: Organizing Good Encounters Without Leaders. Business ethics quarterly, 28(1), 51-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Ethics of Affective Leadership: Organizing Good Encounters Without Leaders
2018 (English)In: Business ethics quarterly, ISSN 1052-150X, E-ISSN 2153-3326, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 51-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses the fundamental question of what is ethical leadership by rearticulating relations between leaders and followers in terms of affective leadership. The article develops a Spinozian conception of ethics which is underpinned by a deep suspicion of ethical systems that hold obedience as a primary virtue. We argue that the existing research into ethical leadership tends to underplay the ethical capacities of followers by presuming that they are in need of direction or care by morally superior leaders. In contrast, affective leadership advocates a profoundly political version of ethics, which involves people in the pursuit of joyful encounters that augment our capacity to affect and be affected by others. Instead of being led by people in leadership positions, we are led by active affections that enhance our capacity for moral action.

Keywords
affective ethics, care, leader-follower relations, leaderless leadership, power, Spinoza
National Category
Economics and Business Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-152483 (URN)10.1017/beq.2017.34 (DOI)000419033500004 ()
Available from: 2018-02-09 Created: 2018-02-09 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Pullen, A., Rhodes, C. & Thanem, T. (2017). Affective politics in gendered organizations: Affirmative notes on becoming-woman. Organization, 24(1), 105-123
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affective politics in gendered organizations: Affirmative notes on becoming-woman
2017 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 105-123Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Current approaches to the study of affective relations are over-determined in a way that ignores their radicality, yet abstracted to such an extent that the corporeality and differentially lived experience of power and resistance is neglected. To radicalize the potential of everyday affects, this article calls for an intensification of corporeality in affect research. We do this by exploring the affective trajectory of ‘becoming-woman’ introduced by Deleuze and Guattari. Becoming-woman is a process of gendered deterritorialization and a specific variation on becoming-minoritarian. Rather than a reference to empirical women, becoming-woman is a necessary force of critique against the phallogocentric powers that shape and constrain working lives in gendered organizations. While extant research on gendered organizations tends to focus on the overwhelming power of oppressive gender structures, engaging with becoming-woman releases affective flows and possibilities that contest and transgress the increasingly subtle and confusing ways in which gendered organization affects people at work. Through becoming-woman, an affective and affirmative politics capable of resisting the effects of gendered organization becomes possible. This serves to further challenge gendered oppression in organizations and to affirm a life beyond the harsh limits that gender can impose.

Keywords
Affect, affirmative politics, becoming-woman, corporeality, gendered organizations, ontology, power, resistance.
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration; Gender Studies; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-139933 (URN)10.1177/1350508416668367 (DOI)000393507300006 ()
Available from: 2017-02-21 Created: 2017-02-21 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Wallenberg, L. & Thanem, T. (2017). What’s Wrong with Queer? Between Queer Dialogue and Separatist Safe Spaces. In: Alison Pullen, Nancy Harding, Mary Phillips (Ed.), Feminists and queer theorists debate the future of critical management studies: (pp. 195-201). Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What’s Wrong with Queer? Between Queer Dialogue and Separatist Safe Spaces
2017 (English)In: Feminists and queer theorists debate the future of critical management studies / [ed] Alison Pullen, Nancy Harding, Mary Phillips, Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017, p. 195-201Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this short piece we take issue with the current separatist tendencies that are being expressed in certain parts of the queer community. We illustrate how this compares with central ideas in proto-queer thought and queer theory, and how it risks undermining the possibility of a queer dialogue and queer politics. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bingley: Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Series
Dialogues in Critical Management Studies, ISSN 2046-6072 ; 3
Keywords
Queer theory, queer politics, queer dialogue, safe spaces, separatism
National Category
Gender Studies Business Administration
Research subject
Gender Studies; Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-141713 (URN)10.1108/S2046-607220160000003016 (DOI)978-1-78635-498-3 (ISBN)978-1-78635-497-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Thanem, T. & Wallenberg, L. (2016). Just doing gender? Transvestism and the power of underdoing gender in everyday life and work. Organization, 23(2), 250-271
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Just doing gender? Transvestism and the power of underdoing gender in everyday life and work
2016 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 250-271Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

While previous research in organization studies has utilized transgender to show how gender is done, overdone and undone, this literature lacks empirical grounding, and the theoretical arguments dominating it tend to idealize the transgressive power of transgender while reducing transgender to hyperbolic drag and stereotypical passing. To further advance the understanding of transgender within and around organizations, this article presents a qualitative study from a Northern European country to investigate how male-to-female transvestites do and undo gender in everyday life and work. In contrast to extant research, we found that participants did transgender and undid gender by underdoing gender, that is, by combining feminine, masculine and ungendered practices and attributes in ways that made passing and drag insignificant. As transvestites simultaneously expressed masculine and feminine forms of embodiment, we argue that they may more obviously challenge, though not dismantle, dominant forms of gender and identity than suggested by previous accounts. We conclude by discussing broader implications for the understanding of gender, identity, power and resistance in organizations.

Keywords
Passing, power, resistance, stigmatized identities at work, transgender, undoing gender
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration; Fashion Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101903 (URN)10.1177/1350508414547559 (DOI)000371167900006 ()
Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-03-17 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6020-1304

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