Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Yakhlef, Ali
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 44) Show all publications
Stendahl, E., Tippmann, E. & Yakhlef, A. (2022). Practice creation in multinational corporations: Improvisation and the emergence of lateral knowledge. Journal of world business (Print), 57(3), Article ID 101287.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Practice creation in multinational corporations: Improvisation and the emergence of lateral knowledge
2022 (English)In: Journal of world business (Print), ISSN 1090-9516, E-ISSN 1878-5573, Vol. 57, no 3, article id 101287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lateral collaboration across subsidiaries is beneficial for innovation in multinational corporations (MNCs), such as the creation of new organizational practices, because it helps working towards shared, rather than subsidiarycentric, objectives and creates new knowledge. To instill lateral collaboration, prior research has mainly focused on coordination mechanisms that rely on interpersonal exchanges among dispersed individuals across subsidiaries. However, due to rising concerns over coordination cost and sustainability of international travel, MNCs are increasingly challenged to search for other approaches that require less direct interpersonal interaction across subsidiaries. We, therefore, ask: How can MNCs elicit lateral collaboration during practice creation in a less space-time sensitive way? Drawing on a longitudinal case study, we develop a model of practice creation in MNCs. Our model offers two main insights. First, it details a novel approach for unleashing the benefits of lateral collaboration in globally-linked innovation processes in MNCs. In contrast to emphasizing coordination mechanisms that focus on interpersonal interactions across subsidiaries, our study contributes by detailing the emergence of lateral knowledge through a shared technological artefact as key enabler. Second, our model illuminates how MNCs can innovate new organizational practices that reflect both MNC and local subsidiary needs by adopting an improvisational approach.

Keywords
MNCs, MNEs, subsidiaries, improvisation, new practice creation, technological artefacts, lateral knowledge
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200398 (URN)10.1016/j.jwb.2021.101287 (DOI)000725563000002 ()
Available from: 2022-01-06 Created: 2022-01-06 Last updated: 2022-01-06Bibliographically approved
Yakhlef, A. & Nordin, F. (2021). Effects of firm presence in customer-owned touch points: A self-determination perspective. Journal of Business Research, 130, 473-481
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of firm presence in customer-owned touch points: A self-determination perspective
2021 (English)In: Journal of Business Research, ISSN 0148-2963, E-ISSN 1873-7978, Vol. 130, p. 473-481Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Customer-owned touch points have emerged as a central context for customers to consume, contribute, and create content while interacting with one another on social media. Research on how firms’ attempts to intervene in such forums affect customers’ experience supremacy is still in its infancy. This study attempts to address this limitation, suggesting a framework for understanding firms’ impact on customer experience in customer-owned forums. Towards this aim, we adopt self-determination theory as a theoretical lens, and, empirically draw on interview material gleaned from customer-owned touch point users. The results show that companies’ attempt to control the discussions in such forums may have a negative impact on customers' experiences when it undermines their sense of autonomy, relatedness, and competence. However, firms’ intervention is welcome when the intention is to add value, enabling customers to retain or enhance their feeling of self-efficacy and social esteem.

Keywords
Customer-owned touch points, Customer engagement, Customer experience, Self-determination theory
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-179785 (URN)10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.12.044 (DOI)000648658800014 ()
Available from: 2020-03-06 Created: 2020-03-06 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Yakhlef, A. & Rietveld, E. (2020). Innovative action as skilled affordance-responsiveness: An embodied-mind approach. Creativity and Innovation Management, 29(1), 99-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Innovative action as skilled affordance-responsiveness: An embodied-mind approach
2020 (English)In: Creativity and Innovation Management, ISSN 0963-1690, E-ISSN 1467-8691, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 99-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Innovative action has often been regarded as the preserve of the deliberate mind and the outcome of individual explicit thought processes. In this regard, the material context within which innovative action occurs is considered as a passive container or at best a modifier of innovative action. Although recent studies have witnessed an interest in relating innovation to issues of embodiment, space and materiality, mainstream research remains largely grounded in a cognitivist, psychological idiom. The present paper takes an embodied-mind perspective and focuses on the individual-environment system as a whole to suggest that innovative action emerges from an agent's skilful responses to unconventional environmental affordances (or action possibilities). Rather than viewing innovation as occurring within material contexts, we offer a new understanding of context as a rich landscape of affordances that is partly constitutive of innovation. The paper concludes with discussions of the proposed approach, its implications for studying innovative action and suggestions for further enquiry.

National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177563 (URN)10.1111/caim.12345 (DOI)000501661300001 ()
Available from: 2020-01-24 Created: 2020-01-24 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Kumar, N., Yakhlef, A. & Nordin, F. (2019). Validation of organizational innovation as a creative learning process. Journal of business & industrial marketing, 34(3), 643-650
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of organizational innovation as a creative learning process
2019 (English)In: Journal of business & industrial marketing, ISSN 0885-8624, E-ISSN 2052-1189, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 643-650Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Previous studies on innovation tend to view innovation as consisting of a creative phase of novel and useful ideas, and a non-creative, or at least a less creative phase, as this considered to be the mere implementation and validation of the initially created ideas. In contrast, this paper aims to stress on the significance of the process of validating a new idea as being a creative, learning, exploratory process that shapes the degree of novelty of the innovation as a whole.

Design/methodology/approach: In driving this argument, this study deductively builds on a theoretical pre-understanding derived from extant literature related to management innovation and organizational legitimacy, and inductively draws on information gleaned from three in-depth case studies.

Findings: The study shows that the validation phase in the innovation process is a creative process, rather than just being a set of activities that relate to the mere execution of the created ideas. Viewing the validation process as an exploratory search for new knowledge, this study establishes a relationship between the form of knowledge mobilized, vertically within an organization or horizontally from outside, and the form of legitimation required. Validation based on internally generated knowledge is effective in terms of achieving pragmatic (efficiency-driven) objectives. Inter-organizational knowledge inflows are associated with cognitive legitimacy – a form of legitimacy that leads to changes in the stakeholders’ beliefs about a the product. In contradistinction, horizontal, socio–cultural inflows of knowledge are likely to improve on the product itself, thereby generating more traction for validation.

Research limitations/implications: This research is based on data collected from three firms only.

Practical implications: The idea developed here can provide business organizations a better understanding of the validation process of management innovations. This study suggests that successful innovation often requires managers to be prepared to seek knowledge beyond the confines of their own organizations.

Originality/value: This study contributes in three ways: it submits that there is a dynamic interplay between the moments of creation and validation, which is largely shaped by the novelty of the mobilized knowledge, depending on whether it is internal top–down or external horizontal; relatedly, the effectiveness of validation is shaped by the novelty of the knowledge garnered to justify the initial ideas; and the present paper has extended Suchman’s (1995) framework by linking the effectiveness of the various forms of legitimacy to the source of knowledge mobilized in the validation process.

Keywords
Innovation, Change agent, Legitimacy, Validation of management innovation
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161800 (URN)10.1108/JBIM-02-2017-0026 (DOI)000463897400010 ()
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Kumar, N., Nordin, F. & Yakhlef, A. (2016). Managerial Innovation Process: Antecedents, Activities, and Outcomes. In: Proceedings: . Paper presented at 2016 CBIM Academic Workshop, Bilbao, Spain, June 29-July 1, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managerial Innovation Process: Antecedents, Activities, and Outcomes
2016 (English)In: Proceedings, 2016Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-140980 (URN)
Conference
2016 CBIM Academic Workshop, Bilbao, Spain, June 29-July 1, 2016
Note

These Workshop Proceedings are a collection of abstracts and working papers, i.e., manuscript versions of academic articles still incomplete or in progress. They are offered here in the interests of acknowledging authorship to the Scientific and Organizing committees of this Academic Workshop, and promoting a constructive debate during the event.

Available from: 2017-03-27 Created: 2017-03-27 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Kumar, N. & Yakhlef, A. (2016). Managing business-to-business relationships under conditions of employee attrition: A transparency approach. Industrial Marketing Management, 56, 143-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Managing business-to-business relationships under conditions of employee attrition: A transparency approach
2016 (English)In: Industrial Marketing Management, ISSN 0019-8501, E-ISSN 1873-2062, Vol. 56, p. 143-155Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Client-contact employee attrition can negatively affect client-supplier relationships, a problem all the more obvious within the knowledge-intensive service industry in which the untimely loss of employees adversely affects client relationships. From the client's perspective, employee attrition increases uncertainty over the perceived quality of service and results in the loss of valuable tacit knowledge from the provider. Drawing on case study materials, this paper seeks to develop a framework for understanding how firms can successfully manage client relationships despite threats of employee attrition. This paper suggests that relationship transparency based on the active transfer of information, knowledge retention and sharing, the implementation of succession plans, and timely intervention by the management, can reduce clients' perceived uncertainty, thereby fortifying a trusted relationship with their provider. This study offers a transparency-based conceptual framework that contributes to the business-to-business relationship literature within the knowledge-intensive service industry and discusses managerial implications.

Keywords
Knowledge-intensive services, Employee attrition, Relationship transparency, Knowledge codification, Succession plans
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-94124 (URN)10.1016/j.indmarman.2016.01.002 (DOI)000380414700014 ()
Available from: 2013-09-27 Created: 2013-09-27 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Yakhlef, A. (2015). Customer experience within retail environments: An embodied, spatial approach. Marketing Theory, 15(4), 545-564
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Customer experience within retail environments: An embodied, spatial approach
2015 (English)In: Marketing Theory, ISSN 1470-5931, E-ISSN 1741-301X, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 545-564Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although the literature on customer experience within retail environments spontaneously invokes the sensuous, affective and emotional aspects of experience, the body – which is the locus of these – is conspicuous by its absence. In these terms, researchers have relied on a theory of mind. This article seeks to suggest an embodied, spatial approach to customer experience, arguing that it is thanks to the body that we sense the environment, and that likewise, it is thanks to the environment that we can sense and experience our body. The reciprocity between body and world implies an inter-corporeality that extends or retracts the spatiality of the body as a result of its motility. This article emphasizes the bodily, spatial character of customer experience, concluding with implications and suggestions for future studies. 

Keywords
Body and embodiment, customer experience, habitus, impulsive action, inter-corporeality, retail environmental
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-123703 (URN)10.1177/1470593115569016 (DOI)000365586700005 ()
Available from: 2015-12-02 Created: 2015-12-02 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Kumar, N. & Yakhlef, A. (2015). The effects of entrepreneurial marketing strategies on the long-term competitive sustenance of born global firms: examples from the Indian knowledge-intensive services industry. Advances in International Marketing, 25, 45-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effects of entrepreneurial marketing strategies on the long-term competitive sustenance of born global firms: examples from the Indian knowledge-intensive services industry
2015 (English)In: Advances in International Marketing, ISSN 1474-7979, Vol. 25, p. 45-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study is to examine how knowledge-intensive born global firms operating in international markets develop and maintain long-term relationships with their customers that insure their continued growth beyond the initial stage of internationalization.

Methodology/approach: the study adopts a case study approach, focusing on two Indian born-global firms operating with the knowledge-based services sector.

Findings: The study shows that getting to know the customer intimately helps firms to retain customers over long periods of time. Customer-relationship management strategy is in line with the entrepreneurial orientation of the firms under consideration.

Research implications: This paper contributes to scholarly discussion on the internationalisation success of born global firms by integrating insights from international entrepreneurial orientation and the marketing relationship literatures.

Practical implications: The paper presents practical implications for international new venture managers.

Originality/value of paper: The paper advances our understanding of the competitive sustenance of born global firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2015
Keywords
Entrepreneurial orientation, customer orientation, competitive sustenance of born global firms, Indian knowledge-intensive service firms
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-70367 (URN)10.1108/S1474-797920140000025003 (DOI)
Note

An earlier version of this paper titled "Exploring the effects of entrepreneurial orientation and customer orientation on the survival and long-term competitive sustenance of born global firms" was presented at the AIB 2012 Annual Meeting Washington, DC, USA, June 30-July 3, 2012.

Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-20 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Kumar, N. & Yakhlef, A. (2014). How capabilities evolve in a born global firm? A case study of an Indian knowledge-intensive service born global firm. Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, 6(3), 223-242
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How capabilities evolve in a born global firm? A case study of an Indian knowledge-intensive service born global firm
2014 (English)In: Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, ISSN 2053-4604, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 223-242Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose - The aim of this paper to examine the mechanism through which the capabilities related to internationalization emerge and are acquired as firms internationalize.

Design/methodology/approach - This study draws on existing literature on born global firms and dynamic capabilities to develop a tentative framework and then use that to examine a longitudinal case study of an Indian firm operating within knowledge-intensive services industry. We probe into the role played by these capabilities in the survival and sustained international growth of born global firms.

Findings - The study establishes a link between firm’s ability to develop such capabilities for global service delivery and its growth and survival. It is suggested that dynamic capabilities emerge as the result of a mix of experiential and deliberate learning processes, being in a constant change in rhythm with changes in domestic as well as in international business environments.

Research limitations/implications - This study is based on a single case study from knowledge-intensive service industry in India with its own particular characteristics. Thus, the findings of this study may not be generalised across other emerging markets or industry.

Practical implications - Entrepreneurs and managers of new ventures can benefit from this study, as this study helps them develop a deeper understanding of the different capability requirements for successful internationalisation.

Originality/value - This study contributed to the existing literature on capability evolution in born global firms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014
Keywords
capability-based view; dynamic capability; knowledge-intensive service firms; early internationalisation of firms; emerging market firms
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-76817 (URN)10.1108/JEEE-06-2014-0018 (DOI)
Note

An earlier version of the paper was presented at the AIB 2012 Annual Meeting Washington, DC, USA, June 30-July 3, 2012.

Available from: 2012-05-17 Created: 2012-05-17 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Edenius, M. & Yakhlef, A. (2013). Open Innovation Technologies and Exploitative and Explorative Learning. In: Jenny S. Z. Eriksson Lundström, Mikael Wiberg, Stefan Hrastinski, Mats Edenius, Pär J. Ågerfalk (Ed.), Managing Open Innovation Technologies: (pp. 53-65). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Open Innovation Technologies and Exploitative and Explorative Learning
2013 (English)In: Managing Open Innovation Technologies / [ed] Jenny S. Z. Eriksson Lundström, Mikael Wiberg, Stefan Hrastinski, Mats Edenius, Pär J. Ågerfalk, Springer, 2013, p. 53-65Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Many organisations are embracing the open innovation approach. However, becoming open to ideas coming from outside requires a revision of their innovation processes in order to integrate external and internal ideas effectively. The aim of this chapter is to explore why and how firms are coping with managing new external ideas from their customers and what they are learning from these ideas. Using information gleaned from interviews with ten organisations which have set up IT application for eliciting feedback from their customers, we found that much of the ideas obtained have led to exploitative learning. Only small firms (with fewer than ten employees) have learned ideas from their customers that have led to exploratory activities. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2013
Keywords
Open Innovation, Knowledge Flow, Explorative Learning, Emerge Research Area, Architectural Knowledge
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-84298 (URN)10.1007/978-3-642-31650-0_4 (DOI)978-3-642-31649-4 (ISBN)978-3-642-31650-0 (ISBN)
Available from: 2012-12-20 Created: 2012-12-20 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications