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Gustafsson, Maria-ThereseORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8458-9320
Publications (10 of 29) Show all publications
Schilling-Vacaflor, A. & Gustafsson, M.-T. (2024). Integrating human rights in the sustainability governance of global supply chains: Exploring the deforestation-land tenure nexus. Environmental Science and Policy, 154, Article ID 103690.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating human rights in the sustainability governance of global supply chains: Exploring the deforestation-land tenure nexus
2024 (English)In: Environmental Science and Policy, ISSN 1462-9011, E-ISSN 1873-6416, Vol. 154, article id 103690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In contemporary discourse, the need to address urgent environmental issues with a social perspective is widely acknowledged. While theories on policy integration have primarily focused on the national scale, limited attention has been given to the merging of environmental and human rights considerations in global supply chain sustainability governance. Drawing on policy integration theories, we develop an analytical framework for studying Human Rights and Environmental Integration (HREI) within global supply chain governance, specifically examining the deforestation-land tenure nexus in soy supply chains from Brazil to Europe. Our empirical analysis focuses on key policy instruments, including the Soy Moratorium, the Working Group on the Cerrado, the Round Table on Responsible Soy (RTRS), and the EU Regulation on deforestation-free products (EUDR). Drawing from extensive fieldwork in Brazil, we assess the integration of land tenure in these policy instruments, revealing a general weakness in this aspect. Nonetheless, grassroots organizations have played a crucial role in advocating for enhanced HREI, urging the inclusion of land tenure rights in instruments addressing deforestation. Our research highlights that, although global supply chain instruments may not entirely compensate for the deficiencies of domestic policies, they should, at the very least, strive to comprehensively address complex sustainability problems and prevent actions that could worsen existing issues or give rise to new sustainability problems. In conclusion, our study contributes to a more nuanced understanding of the opportunities and structural constraints associated with integrated approaches to interconnected human rights and environmental issues.

Keywords
Environmental governance, Policy integration, Policy instruments, Soy, Brazil, Europe
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies) Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228109 (URN)10.1016/j.envsci.2024.103690 (DOI)001187994400001 ()2-s2.0-85184484828 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-16 Created: 2024-04-16 Last updated: 2024-05-17Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M.-T. & Schilling-Vacaflor, A. (2023). Environmental and human rights due diligence: The critical role of transnational civil society networks. In: : . Paper presented at The European Union in International Affairs conference (EUIA), 3-5 May, Brussel, Belgium..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental and human rights due diligence: The critical role of transnational civil society networks
2023 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224218 (URN)
Conference
The European Union in International Affairs conference (EUIA), 3-5 May, Brussel, Belgium.
Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2023-12-07Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M.-T., Schilling-Vacaflor, A. & Lenschow, A. (2023). Foreign corporate accountability: The contested institutionalization of mandatory due diligence in France and Germany. Regulation and Governance, 17(4), 891-908
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foreign corporate accountability: The contested institutionalization of mandatory due diligence in France and Germany
2023 (English)In: Regulation and Governance, ISSN 1748-5983, E-ISSN 1748-5991, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 891-908Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the recent past, European states have adopted mandatory due diligence (MDD) laws for holding companies accountable for the environmental and human rights impacts of their supply chains. The institutionalization of the international due diligence norm into domestic legislation has, however, been highly contested. Our contribution analyzes the discursive struggles about the meaning of due diligence that have accompanied the institutionalization of MDD in Germany and France. Based on document analysis and legal analysis of laws and law proposals, we identify a state-centric, a market-based, and a polycentric-governance discourse. These discourses are based on fundamentally different understandings of how the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights should be translated into hard law. By outlining these discourses and comparing the related policy preferences, we contribute with a better understanding of different ways in which MDD is institutionalized, with important consequences for the possibilities to enhance corporate accountability in global supply chains. 

Keywords
corporate accountability, discourse analysis, due diligence, public policy, supply chain
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213172 (URN)10.1111/rego.12498 (DOI)000857288200001 ()2-s2.0-85138660649 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research, 2016/11 #5Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019‐01386
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-12-18Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M.-T. & Scurrah, M. (2023). Subnational governance strategies at the extractive frontier: collaboration and conflict in Peru. Territory, Politics, Governance, 11(1), 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subnational governance strategies at the extractive frontier: collaboration and conflict in Peru
2023 (English)In: Territory, Politics, Governance, ISSN 2162-2671, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The past decade has witnessed profound transformations in subnational territories engendered by a dramatic increase in natural resource extraction. Research to date has concentrated largely on why the transfer of extractive revenues often reinforces a ‘local resource curse’; however, little work has been done on subnational governments’ attempts to maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of mining expansion. Drawing on the literature on subnational governance in the context of resource extraction and neoliberal reforms, this study analyses the strategies – confrontational or collaborative – subnational political leaders pursue and the reasons why they pursue them. The findings are based on in-depth field research in two Peruvian subnational regions that are highly dependent on mineral extraction. More specifically, we examine the collaborative strategy pursued in one region and compare it with a confrontational strategy in another. Our analysis indicates that an interplay between institutional capacity and supporting coalitions affects whether subnational leaders undertake a collaborative or a confrontational approach. Based on our findings, we consider the likely effects of these strategies for regional development. By shifting the focus to the agency of subnational leaders, we make an essential contribution to debates about subnational governance in the realm of resource extraction.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-187466 (URN)10.1080/21622671.2020.1840425 (DOI)000591729300001 ()
Available from: 2020-12-10 Created: 2020-12-10 Last updated: 2023-10-06Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M.-T., Schilling-Vacaflor, A. & Lenschow, A. (2023). The politics of supply chain regulations: Towards foreign corporate accountability in the area of human rights and the environment?. Regulation and Governance, 17(4), 853-869
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The politics of supply chain regulations: Towards foreign corporate accountability in the area of human rights and the environment?
2023 (English)In: Regulation and Governance, ISSN 1748-5983, E-ISSN 1748-5991, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 853-869Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, binding regulations in the “home states” of corporations have emerged mainly in the Global North with the aim of holding corporations accountable for human rights and environmental impacts throughout their supply chains. However, we still need a better understanding about to what extent such regulations contribute to enhance “foreign corporate accountability (FCA).” This article introduces a special issue that theorizes and empirically investigates foreign accountability dynamics. We do so by advancing an analytical framework that conceptualizes FCA and identify important contextual conditions that help to explain accountability dynamics. Applying this framework, we show that the drafting, implementation, and enforcement of such regulations are highly political processes, wherein competing ideas embedded within unequal actor constellations and institutional environments shape the possibilities to achieve more transformative change. By theorizing and empirically investigating FCA dynamics, we contribute to advance debates about the sustainability governance of global supply chains. 

Keywords
corporate accountability, due diligence, multinational companies, supply chains, sustainability
National Category
Public Administration Studies Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220474 (URN)10.1111/rego.12526 (DOI)000997518500001 ()2-s2.0-85161199748 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental ResearchSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2023-08-29 Created: 2023-08-29 Last updated: 2024-01-04Bibliographically approved
Schilling-Vacaflor, A. & Gustafsson, M.-T. (2023). Towards more sustainable global supply chains? Company compliance with new human rights and environmental due diligence laws. Environmental Politics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards more sustainable global supply chains? Company compliance with new human rights and environmental due diligence laws
2023 (English)In: Environmental Politics, ISSN 0964-4016, E-ISSN 1743-8934Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Binding regulations have, recently, emerged in the Global North with the aim of holding companies accountable for environmental and/or human rights impacts throughout their supply chains. This article develops and applies an analytical framework to analyze corporate accountability dynamics in global trade, with a focus on the French Duty of Vigilance (DV) law. We analyze how companies in the agri-food sector have complied with the law as well as the emergence of new accountability dynamics. We find that while companies have improved their due diligence systems over time, they enjoy much discretion to interpret their obligations according to a managerial logic and to disclose information selectively. Nevertheless, the DV law has contributed to new accountability dynamics, wherein civil society can use civil liability to pressure companies to comply. Overall, the article advances our understanding of company compliance with new supply chain regulations and the accountability dynamics activated by such rules. 

Keywords
business and human rights, due diligence, environmental governance, French Duty of Vigilance law, supply chains, public policy
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224217 (URN)10.1080/09644016.2023.2221983 (DOI)001007675400001 ()
Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2024-01-09
Gustafsson, M.-T. & Schilling-Vacaflor, A. (2022). Indigenous Peoples and Multiscalar Environmental Governance: The Opening and Closure of Participatory Spaces. Global Environmental Politics, 22(2), 70-94
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indigenous Peoples and Multiscalar Environmental Governance: The Opening and Closure of Participatory Spaces
2022 (English)In: Global Environmental Politics, ISSN 1526-3800, E-ISSN 1536-0091, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 70-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There has been an unprecedented inclusion of Indigenous peoples in environmental governance instruments like free, prior, and informed consent; reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) projects; climate adaptation initiatives; and environmental impact assessment. We draw on theories of participatory governance to show how locally implemented processes have been shaped by their interactions with invited, closed, and indigenous-led spaces at multiple scales. Empirically, our article is based on field research in Latin America, semistructured interviews, and a systematic literature review. We find four main barriers that have (re-)produced environmental injustices in environmental governance: first, a lack of influence over the institutional design of governance instruments; second, the exclusion of Indigenous peoples in the domestication of global instruments; third, policy incoherencies constraining the scope for decision-making; and fourth, weak cross-scale linkages between Indigenous-led spaces. This article helps to elucidate constraints of participatory spaces and identify leeway for transformation toward environmental justice.  

National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213170 (URN)10.1162/glep_a_00642 (DOI)000786601400005 ()2-s2.0-85121508599 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-02-10Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M.-T., Rodríguez-Morales, J. E. & Dellmuth, L. M. (2022). Private adaptation to climate risks: Evidence from the world’s largest mining companies. Climate Risk Management, 35, Article ID 100386.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Private adaptation to climate risks: Evidence from the world’s largest mining companies
2022 (English)In: Climate Risk Management, E-ISSN 2212-0963, Vol. 35, article id 100386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Private companies have in recent years started to disclose information about their exposure and responses to climate risks. However, we still know little about how and why private actors engage in climate change adaptation, and to what extent they do so in ways that improve societal resilience. This article addresses these questions. It conceptualizes private adaptation as consisting of institutional, infrastructural and community-oriented responses to climate risks. It develops a political-economic framework about the drivers of private adaptation, where private adaptation is expected to be shaped by pressures exerted by governments, investors, and civil society actors. Empirically, the framework is explored by using an original dataset on the adaptation responses of the 37 largest mining companies worldwide. We select the mining sector as mineral extraction plays a critical role in the low-carbon transition, and can, at the same time, exacerbate climate vulnerability in extracting sites. The descriptive findings suggest that the majority of the investigated companies have set up procedures to assess climate impacts on business operations, integrated climate risks in water governance, and adapted their infrastructure. The explanatory results indicate that private adaptation is mainly driven by investor pressures, and not domestic regulations and civil society. By implication, companies rarely engage in community-oriented adaptation responses by cooperating with local communities in ways that would benefit these communities. Taken together, our findings help to better understand the limitations of private adaptation and barriers to achieve transformative change, and identify how private adaptation could help improve societal resilience.

Keywords
Climate adaptation, Local communities, Extractive industries, Mining, Private adaptation, Political economy
National Category
Climate Research Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213171 (URN)10.1016/j.crm.2021.100386 (DOI)000776078700006 ()2-s2.0-85121566437 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
Dellmuth, L. M. & Gustafsson, M.-T. (2021). Global adaptation governance: how intergovernmental organizations mainstream climate change adaptation. Climate Policy, 21(7), 868-883
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global adaptation governance: how intergovernmental organizations mainstream climate change adaptation
2021 (English)In: Climate Policy, ISSN 1469-3062, E-ISSN 1752-7457, Vol. 21, no 7, p. 868-883Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change adaptation is increasingly being mainstreamed into all types of organizations across the world. A large number of intergovernmental organizations (IGOs), such as the European Union, the World Bank, or Food and Agriculture Organization, have already started to mainstream adaptation. Yet, despite a surge in scholarly interest in climate policy integration over the past decade, adaptation is still predominantly studied as a local issue and mainstreaming in IGOs remains poorly understood. In this article, we develop and test an innovative framework for examining adaptation mainstreaming practices in IGOs. Using quantitative and qualitative data derived from extensive fieldwork conducted between 2017 and 2020, we examine mainstreaming practices in a large number of IGOs and arrive at two key findings. First, adaptation has been mainstreamed within the procedures and outputs of IGOs across ten (nonclimate) issue areas, while there is also evidence of important issue-specific variation. Second, there is variation across mainstreaming practices in the sense that discursive mainstreaming is most common, whereas more concrete collaboration, policy change affecting projects and programs, and budget allocations are less common. We conclude with a discussion of how our framework can inform the theory and practice of global adaptation governance.

Keywords
Climate policy and governance, mainstreaming, international organizations, adaptation
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
International Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-194394 (URN)10.1080/14693062.2021.1927661 (DOI)000653007100001 ()
Projects
Glocalizing Climate Governance (GlocalClim), funded by the Swedish Research Council for Sustainable Development (Formas, 2015-00948)"Mistra Geopolitics: Navigating a Secure and Sustainable Future era" (DIA 2016/11 #5)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2015-00948Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research, DIA 2016/11 #5
Available from: 2021-06-19 Created: 2021-06-19 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Kural, E., Dellmuth, L. M. & Gustafsson, M.-T. (2021). International organizations and climate change adaptation: A new dataset for the social scientific study of adaptation, 1990-2017. PLOS ONE, 16(9), Article ID e0257101.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International organizations and climate change adaptation: A new dataset for the social scientific study of adaptation, 1990-2017
2021 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 16, no 9, article id e0257101Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article introduces a new dataset on the climate change adaptation activities of international organizations (IOs). While climate change adaptation has been studied at the local level and in the context of major climate organizations, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, we provide a first quantitative dataset on non-environmental IOs that can be linked to different social scientific datasets relevant for adaptation. Our new dataset contains information on the governance activities of 30 IOs from 1990 to 2017. Based on this dataset, we introduce different types of adaptation-related activities and develop a quantitative measure of IOs' climate adaptation engagement. We map the adaptation engagement of the 30 IOs across organizations, across issue areas, and over time. This dataset can be used to compare adaptation activities across and within IOs, but also as an empirical foundation for the emerging research field of global adaptation governance, for which IO climate change adaptation activities are relevant.

Keywords
Climate change, United Nations, European Union, National security, Europe, Finance, African people, Anthropogenic climate change
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-200758 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0257101 (DOI)000729120700090 ()34506547 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85114748427 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-12 Created: 2022-01-12 Last updated: 2022-05-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8458-9320

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