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Proux-Wéra, EstelleORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3752-1806
Publications (10 of 10) Show all publications
Darwish, E., Ghosh, R., Bentzer, J., Tsardakas Renhuldt, N., Proux-Wéra, E., Kamal, N., . . . Van Aken, O. (2023). The dynamics of touch-responsive gene expression in cereals. The Plant Journal, 116(1), 282-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The dynamics of touch-responsive gene expression in cereals
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2023 (English)In: The Plant Journal, ISSN 0960-7412, E-ISSN 1365-313X, Vol. 116, no 1, p. 282-302Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Wind, rain, herbivores, obstacles, neighbouring plants, etc. provide important mechanical cues to steer plant growth and survival. Mechanostimulation to stimulate yield and stress resistance of crops is of significant research interest, yet a molecular understanding of transcriptional responses to touch is largely absent in cereals. To address this, we performed whole-genome transcriptomics following mechanostimulation of wheat, barley, and the recent genome-sequenced oat. The largest transcriptome changes occurred ±25 min after touching, with most of the genes being upregulated. While most genes returned to basal expression level by 1–2 h in oat, many genes retained high expression even 4 h post-treatment in barley and wheat. Functional categories such as transcription factors, kinases, phytohormones, and Ca2+ regulation were affected. In addition, cell wall-related genes involved in (hemi)cellulose, lignin, suberin, and callose biosynthesis were touch-responsive, providing molecular insight into mechanically induced changes in cell wall composition. Furthermore, several cereal-specific transcriptomic footprints were identified that were not observed in Arabidopsis. In oat and barley, we found evidence for systemic spreading of touch-induced signalling. Finally, we provide evidence that both the jasmonic acid-dependent and the jasmonic acid-independent pathways underlie touch-signalling in cereals, providing a detailed framework and marker genes for further study of (a)biotic stress responses in cereals. 

Keywords
Arabidopsis, barley, cereals, mechanical stimulation, oat, touch response, wheat
National Category
Botany Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-229488 (URN)10.1111/tpj.16269 (DOI)001004332500001 ()37159480 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85161589832 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-24 Created: 2024-05-24 Last updated: 2024-05-24Bibliographically approved
Steffen, K., Proux-Wéra, E., Soler, L., Churcher, A., Sundh, J. & Cárdenas, P. (2023). Whole genome sequence of the deep-sea sponge Geodia barretti (Metazoa, Porifera, Demospongiae) . G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, 13(10)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Whole genome sequence of the deep-sea sponge Geodia barretti (Metazoa, Porifera, Demospongiae) 
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2023 (English)In: G3: Genes, Genomes, Genetics, E-ISSN 2160-1836, Vol. 13, no 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sponges are among the earliest branching extant animals. As such, genetic data from this group are valuable for understanding the evolution of various traits and processes in other animals. However, like many marine organisms, they are notoriously difficult to sequence, and hence, genomic data are scarce. Here, we present the draft genome assembly for the North Atlantic deep-sea high microbial abundance species Geodia barretti, from a single individual collected on the West Coast of Sweden. The nuclear genome assembly has 4,535 scaffolds, an N50 of 48,447 bp and a total length of 144 Mb; the mitochondrial genome is 17,996 bp long. BUSCO completeness was 71.5%. The genome was annotated using a combination of ab initio and evidence-based methods finding 31,884 protein-coding genes. 

Keywords
Geodia barretti, Porifera, Tetractinellida, Sweden, symbionts, metagenome-assembled genome
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220969 (URN)10.1093/g3journal/jkad192 (DOI)001058715700001 ()37619978 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174513308 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Westerdahl, H., Mellinger, S., Sigeman, H., Kutschera, V. E., Proux-Wéra, E., Lundberg, M., . . . Strandh, M. (2022). The genomic architecture of the passerine MHC region: High repeat content and contrasting evolutionary histories of single copy and tandemly duplicated MHC genes. Molecular Ecology Resources, 22(6), 2379-2395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genomic architecture of the passerine MHC region: High repeat content and contrasting evolutionary histories of single copy and tandemly duplicated MHC genes
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2022 (English)In: Molecular Ecology Resources, ISSN 1755-098X, E-ISSN 1755-0998, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 2379-2395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is of central importance to the immune system, and an optimal MHC diversity is believed to maximize pathogen elimination. Birds show substantial variation in MHC diversity, ranging from few genes in most bird orders to very many genes in passerines. Our understanding of the evolutionary trajectories of the MHC in passerines is hampered by lack of data on genomic organization. Therefore, we assembled and annotated the MHC genomic region of the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), using long-read sequencing and optical mapping. The MHC region is large (>5.5 Mb), characterized by structural changes compared to hitherto investigated bird orders and shows higher repeat content than the genome average. These features were supported by analyses in three additional passerines. MHC genes in passerines are found in two different chromosomal arrangements, either as single copy MHC genes located among non-MHC genes, or as tandemly duplicated tightly linked MHC genes. Some single copy MHC genes are old and putative orthologues among species. In contrast tandemly duplicated MHC genes are monophyletic within species and have evolved by simultaneous gene duplication of several MHC genes. Structural differences in the MHC genomic region among bird orders seem substantial compared to mammals and have possibly been fuelled by clade-specific immune system adaptations. Our study provides methodological guidance in characterizing complex genomic regions, constitutes a resource for MHC research in birds, and calls for a revision of the general belief that avian MHC has a conserved gene order and small size compared to mammals.

Keywords
gene order, major histocompatibility complex (MHC), Passeriformes, repeats, single copy genes, tandemly duplicated genes
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-204494 (URN)10.1111/1755-0998.13614 (DOI)000780097600001 ()35348299 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85127943929 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-09 Created: 2022-05-09 Last updated: 2022-08-05Bibliographically approved
Sigeman, H., Strandh, M., Proux-Wéra, E., Kutschera, V. E., Ponnikas, S., Zhang, H., . . . Hansson, B. (2021). Avian Neo-Sex Chromosomes Reveal Dynamics of Recombination Suppression and W Degeneration. Molecular biology and evolution, 38(12), 5275-5291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Avian Neo-Sex Chromosomes Reveal Dynamics of Recombination Suppression and W Degeneration
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2021 (English)In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 38, no 12, p. 5275-5291Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How the avian sex chromosomes first evolved from autosomes remains elusive as 100 million years (My) of divergence and degeneration obscure their evolutionary history. The Sylvioidea group of songbirds is interesting for understanding avian sex chromosome evolution because a chromosome fusion event 24 Ma formed “neo-sex chromosomes” consisting of an added (new) and an ancestral (old) part. Here, we report the complete female genome (ZW) of one Sylvioidea species, the great reed warbler (Acrocephalus arundinaceus). Our long-read assembly shows that the added region has been translocated to both Z and W, and whereas the added-Z has retained its gene order the added-W part has been heavily rearranged. Phylogenetic analyses show that recombination between the homologous added-Z and -W regions continued after the fusion event, and that recombination suppression across this region took several million years to be completed. Moreover, recombination suppression was initiated across multiple positions over the added-Z, which is not consistent with a simple linear progression starting from the fusion point. As expected following recombination suppression, the added-W show signs of degeneration including repeat accumulation and gene loss. Finally, we present evidence for nonrandom maintenance of slowly evolving and dosage-sensitive genes on both ancestral- and added-W, a process causing correlated evolution among orthologous genes across broad taxonomic groups, regardless of sex linkage.

Keywords
sex chromosome, neo-sex chromosome, recombination, degeneration, vertebrate, bird
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-201353 (URN)10.1093/molbev/msab277 (DOI)000741368600005 ()34542640 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-01-24 Created: 2022-01-24 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Almeida, P., Proux-Wéra, E., Churcher, A., Soler, L., Dainat, J., Pucholt, P., . . . Mank, J. E. (2020). Genome assembly of the basket willow, Salix viminalis, reveals earliest stages of sex chromosome expansion. BMC Biology, 18(1), Article ID 78.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome assembly of the basket willow, Salix viminalis, reveals earliest stages of sex chromosome expansion
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2020 (English)In: BMC Biology, E-ISSN 1741-7007, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 78Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sex chromosomes have evolved independently multiple times in eukaryotes and are therefore considered a prime example of convergent genome evolution. Sex chromosomes are known to emerge after recombination is halted between a homologous pair of chromosomes, and this leads to a range of non-adaptive modifications causing gradual degeneration and gene loss on the sex-limited chromosome. However, the proximal causes of recombination suppression and the pace at which degeneration subsequently occurs remain unclear.

Results: Here, we use long- and short-read single-molecule sequencing approaches to assemble and annotate a draft genome of the basket willow, Salix viminalis, a species with a female heterogametic system at the earliest stages of sex chromosome emergence. Our single-molecule approach allowed us to phase the emerging Z and W haplotypes in a female, and we detected very low levels of Z/W single-nucleotide divergence in the non-recombining region. Linked-read sequencing of the same female and an additional male (ZZ) revealed the presence of two evolutionary strata supported by both divergence between the Z and W haplotypes and by haplotype phylogenetic trees. Gene order is still largely conserved between the Z and W homologs, although the W-linked region contains genes involved in cytokinin signaling regulation that are not syntenic with the Z homolog. Furthermore, we find no support across multiple lines of evidence for inversions, which have long been assumed to halt recombination between the sex chromosomes.

Conclusions: Our data suggest that selection against recombination is a more gradual process at the earliest stages of sex chromosome formation than would be expected from an inversion and may result instead from the accumulation of transposable elements. Our results present a cohesive understanding of the earliest genomic consequences of recombination suppression as well as valuable insights into the initial stages of sex chromosome formation and regulation of sex differentiation.

Keywords
Sex chromosomes, W-chromosome, Recombination suppression, Willow, Salix
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-184567 (URN)10.1186/s12915-020-00808-1 (DOI)000546932800002 ()32605573 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-09-08 Created: 2020-09-08 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Ahmadi-Afzadi, M., Orsel, M., Pelletier, S., Bruneau, M., Proux-Wéra, E., Nybom, H. & Renou, J.-P. (2018). Genome-wide expression analysis suggests a role for jasmonates in the resistance to blue mold in apple. Plant growth regulation (Print), 85(3), 375-387
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-wide expression analysis suggests a role for jasmonates in the resistance to blue mold in apple
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2018 (English)In: Plant growth regulation (Print), ISSN 0167-6903, E-ISSN 1573-5087, Vol. 85, no 3, p. 375-387Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blue mold, caused by the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Penicillium expansum, causes serious postharvest losses in apple, and threatens human health through production of the potent mycotoxin patulin. Recent studies indicate a quantitative control of resistance against this disease in apple cultivars. A whole genome apple microarray covering 60k transcripts was used to identify gene(s) that appear to be differentially regulated between resistant and susceptible cultivars in P. expansum-infected fruits. A number of potential candidates was encountered among defense- and oxidative stress-related genes, cell wall modification and lignification genes, and genes related to localization and transport. Induction of one cell wall-related gene and three genes involved in the 'down-stream' flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, demonstrates the fundamental role of the cell wall as an important barrier, and suggests that fruit flavonoids are involved in the resistance to blue mold. Moreover, exogenous application of the plant hormone methyl jasmonate (MeJA) reduced the symptoms resulting from inoculating apples with P. expansum. This is the first report linking MeJA and activation of cell wall and flavonoid pathway genes to resistance against blue mold in a study comparing different cultivars of domesticated apple. Our results provide an initial categorization of genes that are potentially involved in the resistance mechanism, and should be useful for developing tools for gene marker-assisted breeding of apple cultivars with an improved resistance to blue mold.

Keywords
Candidate gene, Cell wall, Flavonoid pathway, Jasmonic acid, Malus x domestica, Microarray
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158392 (URN)10.1007/s10725-018-0388-2 (DOI)000434997700004 ()
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Le Rhun, A., Lecrivain, A.-L., Reimegård, J., Proux-Wéra, E., Broglia, L., Della Beffa, C. & Charpentier, E. (2017). Identification of endoribonuclease specific cleavage positions reveals novel targets of RNase III in Streptococcus pyogenes. Nucleic Acids Research, 45(5), 2329-2340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of endoribonuclease specific cleavage positions reveals novel targets of RNase III in Streptococcus pyogenes
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2017 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 2329-2340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A better understanding of transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in bacteria relies on studying their transcriptome. RNA sequencing methods are used not only to assess RNA abundance but also the exact boundaries of primary and processed transcripts. Here, we developed a method, called identification of specific cleavage position (ISCP), which enables the identification of direct endoribonuclease targets in vivo by comparing the 5' and 3' ends of processed transcripts between wild type and RNase deficient strains. To demonstrate the ISCP method, we used as a model the double-stranded specific RNase III in the human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes. We mapped 92 specific cleavage positions (SCPs) among which, 48 were previously described and 44 are new, with the characteristic 2 nucleotides 3' overhang of RNase III. Most SCPs were located in untranslated regions of RNAs. We screened for RNase III targets using transcriptomic differential expression analysis (DEA) and compared those with the RNase III targets identified using the ISCP method. Our study shows that in S. pyogenes, under standard growth conditions, RNase III has a limited impact both on antisense transcripts and on global gene expression with the expression of most of the affected genes being downregulated in an RNase III deletion mutant.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142656 (URN)10.1093/nar/gkw1316 (DOI)000397286600018 ()28082390 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-12 Created: 2017-05-12 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Evkaikina, A. I., Berke, L., Romanova, M. A., Proux-Wéra, E., Ivanova, A. N., Rydin, C., . . . Voitsekhovskaja, O. V. (2017). The Huperzia selago Shoot Tip Transcriptome Sheds New Light on the Evolution of Leaves. Genome Biology and Evolution, 9(9), 2444-2460
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Huperzia selago Shoot Tip Transcriptome Sheds New Light on the Evolution of Leaves
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2017 (English)In: Genome Biology and Evolution, E-ISSN 1759-6653, Vol. 9, no 9, p. 2444-2460Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lycopodiophyta-consisting of three orders, Lycopodiales, Isoetales and Selaginellales, with different types of shoot apical meristems (SAMs)-form the earliest branch among the extant vascular plants. They represent a sister group to all other vascular plants, from which they differ in that their leaves are microphylls-that is, leaves with a single, unbranched vein, emerging from the protostele without a leaf gap-not megaphylls. All leaves represent determinate organs originating on the flanks of indeterminate SAMs. Thus, leaf formation requires the suppression of indeterminacy, that is, of KNOX transcription factors. In seed plants, this is mediated by different groups of transcription factors including ARP and YABBY. We generated a shoot tip transcriptome of Huperzia selago (Lycopodiales) to examine the genes involved in leaf formation. Our H. selago transcriptome does not contain any ARP homolog, although transcriptomes of Selaginella spp. do. Surprisingly, we discovered a YABBY homolog, although these transcription factors were assumed to have evolved only in seed plants. The existence of a YABBY homolog in H. selago suggests that YABBY evolved already in the common ancestor of the vascular plants, and subsequently was lost in some lineages like Selaginellales, whereas ARP may have been lost in Lycopodiales. The presence of YABBY in the common ancestor of vascular plants would also support the hypothesis that this common ancestor had a simplex SAM. Furthermore, a comparison of the expression patterns of ARP in shoot tips of Selaginella kraussiana (Harrison CJ, et al. 2005. Independent recruitment of a conserved developmental mechanism during leaf evolution. Nature 434(7032): 509-514.) and YABBY in shoot tips of H. selago implies that the development of microphylls, unlike megaphylls, does not seem to depend on the combined activities of ARP and YABBY. Altogether, our data show that Lycopodiophyta are a diverse group; so, in order to understand the role of Lycopodiophyta in evolution, representatives of Lycopodiales, Selaginellales, as well as of Isoetales, have to be examined.

Keywords
Lycopodiophyta, Huperzia, shoot apex, leaf development, KNOX, ARP, YABBY
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-148902 (URN)10.1093/gbe/evx169 (DOI)000412147400022 ()28957460 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-17 Created: 2017-11-17 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Wolfe, K. H., Armisen, D., Proux-Wéra, E., OhEigeartaigh, S. S., Azam, H., Gordon, J. L. & Byrne, K. P. (2015). Clade- and species-specific features of genome evolution in the Saccharomycetaceae. FEMS yeast research (Print), 15(5), Article ID fov035.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clade- and species-specific features of genome evolution in the Saccharomycetaceae
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2015 (English)In: FEMS yeast research (Print), ISSN 1567-1356, E-ISSN 1567-1364, Vol. 15, no 5, article id fov035Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many aspects of the genomes of yeast species in the family Saccharomycetaceae have been well conserved during evolution. They have similar genome sizes, genome contents, and extensive collinearity of gene order along chromosomes. Gene functions can often be inferred reliably by using information from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Beyond this conservative picture however, there are many instances where a species or a clade diverges substantially from the S. cerevisiae paradigm-for example, by the amplification of a gene family, or by the absence of a biochemical pathway or a protein complex. Here, we review clade-specific features, focusing on genomes sequenced in our laboratory from the post-WGD genera Naumovozyma, Kazachstania and Tetrapisispora, and from the non-WGD species Torulaspora delbrueckii. Examples include the loss of the pathway for histidine synthesis in the cockroach-associated species Tetrapisispora blattae; the presence of a large telomeric GAL gene cluster in To. delbrueckii; losses of the dynein and dynactin complexes in several independent yeast lineages; fragmentation of the MAT locus and loss of the HO gene in Kazachstania africana; and the patchy phylogenetic distribution of RNAi pathway components.

Keywords
evolution, comparative genomics, Kazachstania, Naumovozyma, Tetrapisispora, Torulaspora
National Category
Environmental Biotechnology Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-122509 (URN)10.1093/femsyr/fov035 (DOI)000361790000005 ()
Available from: 2015-11-05 Created: 2015-11-03 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Planells, J., Jordán-Pla, A., Jain, S., Guadalupe, J. J., Proux-Wéra, E., von Euler, A., . . . Visa, N.The exosome degrades chromatin-associated RNAs genome-wide and maintains chromatin homeostasis.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The exosome degrades chromatin-associated RNAs genome-wide and maintains chromatin homeostasis
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(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Chromatin-associated RNAs (caRNAs) modulate chromatin organization and function. The RNAexosome degrades different types of nuclear transcripts, but its role in chromatin has not beenaddressed. Here we have used Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells as a model system to identify therepertoire of caRNAs and establish the role of the exosome in their regulation. We have analyzed bothunique and repetitive sequences, and combining RNA-seq and ATAC-seq we show that thesimultaneous depletion of the exosome catalytic subunits RRP6 and DIS3 not only affects caRNAlevels but also changes the local chromatin accessibility at specific loci. We have identified a group ofexosome-sensitive genes that are involved in developmental regulation and are characterized by abalanced chromatin state in which Polycomb and Trithorax factors coexist. Our results reveal that RNAdegradation by the exosome is an important mechanism for the homeostasis of such balancedchromatin states. Given that eukaryotic genomes are repetitive to a large extent, we have also analyzed repetitive caRNAs (rep-caRNAs) and we show that the exosome is needed to control repcaRNAlevels and to maintain the degree of chromatin packaging in repetitive genomic regions. Thisrole is particularly relevant in the pericentromeric regions where the exosome is required to silenceLTR elements and maintain centromere organization.

National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220785 (URN)
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2023-09-11Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3752-1806

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