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Stenberg, A. & Tudor, S. (2024). Field of Study and Mental Health in Adulthood.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Field of Study and Mental Health in Adulthood
2024 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

We analyze whether field of study assigned at age 16 impacts mental health in adulthood. Using a regression discontinuity design that exploits GPA cut-offs, we find that admission to the preferred study field improves mental health, lowering both the incidence of antidepressant prescriptions and of mental health-related hospitalizations. Engineering contributes strongly but not uniquely to the positive results. As for mechanisms, earnings explain 40% of the estimates, but earlier proposed hypotheses based on school-age peer characteristics have little explanatory power. Our findings imply that restrictions on individuals’ choices, to improve human capi tal allocations, entail costs that may have been underestimated.

Publisher
p. 77
Keywords
field of study, health, secondary education
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-226812 (URN)
Available from: 2024-02-21 Created: 2024-02-21 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
Dahl, G. B., Rooth, D.-O. & Stenberg, A. (2023). High School Majors and Future Earnings. American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 15(1), 351-382
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High School Majors and Future Earnings
2023 (English)In: American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, ISSN 1945-7782, E-ISSN 1945-7790, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 351-382Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study how high school majors affect adult earnings using a regression discontinuity design. In Sweden students are admitted to majors in tenth grade based on their preference rankings and ninth grade GPA. We find engineering, natural science, and business majors yield higher earnings than social science and humanities, with major-specific returns also varying based on next-best alternatives. There is either a zero or a negative return to completing an academic program for students with a second-best nonacademic major. Most of the differences in adult earnings can be attributed to differences in occupation, and to a lesser extent, college major.

Keywords
Analysis of Education, Returns to Education, Human Capital, Skills, Occupational Choice, Labor Productivity, Wage Level and Structure, Wage Differentials
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-214817 (URN)10.1257/app.20210292 (DOI)000913281000002 ()
Available from: 2023-02-15 Created: 2023-02-15 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
Rooth, D.-O., Stenberg, A. & Dahl, G. B. (2023). Intergenerational and Sibling Spillovers in High School Majors.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intergenerational and Sibling Spillovers in High School Majors
2023 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper estimates family spillovers in high school major choice in Sweden, where admission to oversubscribed majors is determined based on GPA. Using a regression discontinuity design, we find large sibling and intergenerational spillovers that depend on the gender mix of a dyad. Same-gender siblings copy one another, while younger brothers recoil from older sister's choices. Fathers and mothers influence sons, but not their daughters, except when a mother majors in the male-dominated program of Engineering. Back of the envelope calculations reveal these within family spillovers have sizable implications for the gender composition of majors.

Keywords
intergenerational spillovers, sibling spillovers, high school majors, gender composition of majors
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225190 (URN)
Available from: 2024-01-10 Created: 2024-01-10 Last updated: 2024-01-10
Stenberg, A. (2022). A Note on Evaluating Formal Education for Adults.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Note on Evaluating Formal Education for Adults
2022 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Evaluations of adults in formal education (AE) are typically based on earnings measured 5-10 years after program enrollment. This paper estimates returns up to 24 years after enrollment, and explore results for 15 cohorts of first-time registered in AE in Sweden 1994-2008 with at least a 10-year follow-up period. The results indicate substantially higher payoffs in absolute terms after the maximum length of follow-up compared with after 10 years. There is also weak support that multiplier effects increase the percentage returns to AE over time, regardless of gender or whether the level of AE is college or high school. 

Publisher
p. 53
Series
Swedish Institute for Social Research, ISSN 0283-8222 ; 1/2022
Keywords
Adult education, Self-selection, Propensity score matching
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-201677 (URN)
Available from: 2022-02-01 Created: 2022-02-01 Last updated: 2022-06-15
Stenberg, A. (2022). Does formal education for adults yield long-term multiplier effects or human capital depreciation?. Economics of Education Review, 90, Article ID 102306.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does formal education for adults yield long-term multiplier effects or human capital depreciation?
2022 (English)In: Economics of Education Review, ISSN 0272-7757, E-ISSN 1873-7382, Vol. 90, article id 102306Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evaluations of adults in formal education (AE) are typically based on earnings measured 5-10 years after pro-gram enrollment. This paper uses propensity score matching to estimate returns up to 24 years after enrollment, and explore results for 15 cohorts of AE enrollees in Sweden 1994-2008 with at least a 10-year follow-up period. The results indicate substantially higher payoffs in absolute terms after the maximum length of follow-up compared with after 10 years. There is weak support that multiplier effects increase the percentage returns to AE over time, regardless of gender or whether the level of AE is college or high school.

Keywords
Adult education, Self-selection, Propensity score matching
National Category
Economics and Business Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-210049 (URN)10.1016/j.econedurev.2022.102306 (DOI)000851373100004 ()
Available from: 2022-10-06 Created: 2022-10-06 Last updated: 2022-10-06Bibliographically approved
Hederos, K. & Stenberg, A. (2022). Gender identity and relative income within households: evidence from Sweden. Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 124(3), 744-772
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender identity and relative income within households: evidence from Sweden
2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, ISSN 0347-0520, E-ISSN 1467-9442, Vol. 124, no 3, p. 744-772Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In their study of relative income within US households, Bertrand et al. (2015, Quarterly Journal of Economics 130, 571–614) show that the distribution of the wife's share of household income drops sharply where the wife starts earning more than her husband. They attribute the drop to a gender norm prescribing that a wife's income should not exceed her husband's income. We document a similar drop in Swedish data. However, we also show that there is a spike where spouses earn exactly the same. Excluding the equal-earning spouses, the drop is small and mostly statistically insignificant. We conclude that, if anything, we find only weak evidence that Swedish couples comply with this gender norm.

Keywords
Gender gap, gender identity, gender norms, gender roles, marriage market
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207861 (URN)10.1111/sjoe.12477 (DOI)000815601000001 ()2-s2.0-85132559910 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-17 Created: 2022-08-17 Last updated: 2023-01-24Bibliographically approved
Rooth, D.-O. & Stenberg, A. (2022). Valet av gymnasieutbildning och dessbetydelse för inkomster i vuxen ålder. Ekonomisk Debatt, 50(6), 8-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Valet av gymnasieutbildning och dessbetydelse för inkomster i vuxen ålder
2022 (Swedish)In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 8-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Abstract [sv]

Denna studie använder unika data som gör det möjligt att utvärdera kausala effekter på arbetsinkomster vid 38 års ålder för de fem högskoleförberedande linjerna som fanns på gymnasiet 1977–91. Resultaten visar överlag positiva effekter av teknisk, ekonomisk och naturvetenskaplig linje, i flera fall motsvarande vad man funnit för ytterligare två utbildningsår, men för samhällsvetenskaplig och humanistisk linje finner vi i flera fall lika stora negativa effekter som indikerar att individernas inkomster skulle varit högre om de i stället antagits till sitt andrahandsval. Kvinnor är kraftigt överrepresenterade i utbildningar med negativ avkastning. Den huvudsakliga mekanismen bakom resultaten är att gymnasieutbildning påverkar yrkesval.

National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-210548 (URN)
Available from: 2022-10-20 Created: 2022-10-20 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
Eliasson, K. & Stenberg, A. (2021). Evaluating the Impact on Labor Earnings of Higher Vocational Education. Tillväxtanalys: Myndigheten för tillväxtpolitiska utvärderingar och analyser
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluating the Impact on Labor Earnings of Higher Vocational Education
2021 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

International bodies such as the EU and the OECD have repeatedly advocated improved opportunities for adults to improve their schooling. However, formal education for adults is expensive, particularly in terms of foregone earnings, and the returns to society and the individual is uncertain. Until recently, there is only scant evidence on the labor market impacts of post-secondary education for adults outside the US. This paper focuses on the earnings effects of higher vocational education (HVE) in Sweden.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tillväxtanalys: Myndigheten för tillväxtpolitiska utvärderingar och analyser, 2021. p. 29
Keywords
Adult education, Self-selection, Propensity score matching
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-201686 (URN)
Available from: 2022-02-01 Created: 2022-02-01 Last updated: 2022-02-02Bibliographically approved
Dahl, G. B., Rooth, D.-O. & Stenberg, A. (2020). Family Spillovers in Field of Study. Cambridge, Massachusetts: National Bureau of Economic Research
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family Spillovers in Field of Study
2020 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper estimates peer effects both from older to younger siblings and from parents to children in academic fields of study. Our setting is secondary school in Sweden, where admissions to oversubscribed fields is determined based on a student's GPA. Using an RD design, we find strong spillovers in field choices that depend on the gender mix of siblings and whether the field is gender conforming. There are also large intergenerational effects from fathers and mothers to sons, except in female-dominated fields, but little effect for daughters. These spillovers have long-term consequences for occupational segregation and wage gaps by gender.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge, Massachusetts: National Bureau of Economic Research, 2020. p. 34
Series
NBER Working Paper Series ; 27618
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-184953 (URN)
Available from: 2020-09-11 Created: 2020-09-11 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
Dahl, G. B., Rooth, D.-O. & Stenberg, A. (2020). Long-Run Returns to Field of Study in Secondary School. Bonn, Germany: IZA Institute of Labor Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-Run Returns to Field of Study in Secondary School
2020 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper studies whether specialized academic fields of study in secondary school, which are common in many countries, affect earnings as an adult. Identification is challenging, because it requires not just quasi-random variation into fields of study, but also an accounting of individuals’ next-best alternatives. Our setting is Sweden, where at the end of ninth grade students rank fields of study and admissions to oversubscribed fields is determined based on a student’s GPA. We use a regression discontinuity design which allows for different labor market returns for each combination of preferred versus next-best choice, together with nationwide register data for school cohorts from 1977-1991 linked to their earnings as adults. Our analysis yields four main findings. First, Engineering, Natural Science, and Business yield higher earnings relative to most second-best choices, while Social Science and Humanities result in sizable drops, even relative to non-academic vocational programs. Second, the return to completing a field varies substantially as a function of a student’s next-best alternative. The magnitudes are often as large as estimates of the return to two years of additional education. Third, the pattern of returns for individuals with different first and second best choices is consistent with comparative advantage for many field choice combinations, while others exhibit either random sorting or comparative disadvantage. Fourth, most of the differences in adult earnings can be attributed to differences in college major and occupation. Taken together, these results highlight that the field choices students make at age 16, when they may have limited information about their skills and the labor market, have effects which last into adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bonn, Germany: IZA Institute of Labor Economics, 2020. p. 54
Series
IZA Discussion Paper Series, ISSN 2365-9793 ; 13508
Keywords
field of study, secondary education, comparative advantage
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-184955 (URN)
Available from: 2020-09-11 Created: 2020-09-11 Last updated: 2023-04-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3024-9862

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