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Jensen, Tommy
Publications (10 of 62) Show all publications
Jensen, T. & Mahmud, Y. (2024). Poetic encounters in field work. Gender, Work and Organization, 31(1), 305-318
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poetic encounters in field work
2024 (English)In: Gender, Work and Organization, ISSN 0968-6673, E-ISSN 1468-0432, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 305-318Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we seek to belong to the “writing differently” turn in organization studies. We argue that writing poetry when doing field work is a way of disrupting and unsettling the objective scientific gaze, the scientific ideal of experiencing the world, and of opening for the Buberian world—the world as an encounter in itself. A tension framed by Buber as I-It and I-You. Rather than merely arguing that poetry can help us understand the world differently, we argue that poetry can help us encounter the world differently. Further, by telling two field work stories, we show that poetry can help the researcher to remain human in the field. Having hope in writing poetry when doing field work transcends the more politically and individually oriented engaged ethnography, realizing that field work as encounter—I and You—holds the possibility of not only companionship, trust, mercy, cooperation, forming of joint causes, dreams but also betrayal, plundering, exploitation, and force.

Keywords
ethnography, field work, Martin Buber, poetry, writing differently
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223551 (URN)10.1111/gwao.13074 (DOI)001088107500001 ()2-s2.0-85174284777 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-02 Created: 2023-11-02 Last updated: 2023-12-12
Jensen, T. & Zawadzki, M. (2023). Contextualizing capitalism in academia: How capitalist and feudalist organizing principles reinforce each other at Polish universities. Organization, 135050842311615
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contextualizing capitalism in academia: How capitalist and feudalist organizing principles reinforce each other at Polish universities
2023 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we show how capitalism and feudalism reinforce each other to enable the former’s success in the higher education context. In this regard, Polish universities are an interesting case due to Poland’s capitalist shock therapy in the 1990s, its Western European membership in the European Union in the 2000s and due to recent reforms intended to modernize Polish academia. Based on 36 interviews with Polish early career academics from urban universities with experience working in watchdogs of higher education, we examine respondents’ perspectives on the current capitalist reforms. They treat ongoing changes as a solution for the problems experienced and defined as “feudal”: political labeling, abuse of power and discrimination against women. Understanding capitalism and feudalism through their organizing principles, the main contribution of this study is that it demonstrates how capitalist organizing principles fix existing feudalist organizing principles to flourish in Polish university. Hence, it is difficult for early career academics to recognize that capitalist organizing principles are in fact reinforcing rather than eliminating (as the advocates of capitalist reforms often claim) feudal problems in Polish academia.

Keywords
Abuse of power, capitalism, discrimination against women, early career academics, feudalism, Poland, political labeling, university
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-217107 (URN)10.1177/13505084231161566 (DOI)000968582400001 ()2-s2.0-85152285194 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-24 Created: 2023-05-24 Last updated: 2023-05-24
Jensen, T. & Mahmud, Y. (2023). Decentering sensemaking: The Mann Gulch disaster revisited. Scandinavian Journal of Management, 39(3), Article ID 101279.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decentering sensemaking: The Mann Gulch disaster revisited
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Management, ISSN 0956-5221, E-ISSN 1873-3387, Vol. 39, no 3, article id 101279Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite previous efforts to deal with the ontological split between human subjects and reality, sensemaking has remained human-centered. We argue that human-centered sensemaking risks omitting constitutive elements of reality. To escape the ontological split, we decenter sensemaking and thus extend it in such a way that it allows seemingly unrelated and independent humans and nonhumans to become connected and interdependent with what is made sense of. Doing so allows us to demonstrate how a decentered understanding of reality can produce a radically different understanding of research phenomena. As a means to show the consequences of a decentered sensemaking, we revisit the Mann Gulch disaster and show that not all disasters can be avoided by better sensemaking or good management.

Keywords
Sensemaking, Decentered sensemaking, Fire management, Mann Gulch disaster, Wildfires
National Category
Economics and Business
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-218654 (URN)10.1016/j.scaman.2023.101279 (DOI)001001179600001 ()
Available from: 2023-06-21 Created: 2023-06-21 Last updated: 2023-06-21Bibliographically approved
Östberg, J. & Jensen, T. (2021). Black Metal - Bara i döden är vi true. In: Emilie Reinhold; Oscar Wandery (Ed.), På tal om döden: Essäer (pp. 117-134). Göteborg: Makadam Förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Black Metal - Bara i döden är vi true
2021 (Swedish)In: På tal om döden: Essäer / [ed] Emilie Reinhold; Oscar Wandery, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 117-134Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2021
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-192843 (URN)978-91-7061-332-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-04-29 Created: 2021-04-29 Last updated: 2022-02-11Bibliographically approved
Jensen, T. & Sandström, J. (2021). Döden i gruvan. In: Emilie Reinhold, Oscar Wandery (Ed.), På tal om döden: Essäer (pp. 14-31). Göteborg: Makadam Förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Döden i gruvan
2021 (Swedish)In: På tal om döden: Essäer / [ed] Emilie Reinhold, Oscar Wandery, Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2021, p. 14-31Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Göteborg: Makadam Förlag, 2021
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-192842 (URN)978-91-7061-332-6 (ISBN)
Available from: 2021-04-29 Created: 2021-04-29 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Jensen, T. & Sandström, J. (2021). Gruvans makt. Luleå: Black Island Books
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gruvans makt
2021 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

En gång i tiden satt gruvnäringen och Kiruna ihop. Ett ömsesidigt beroende som ändrats med tiden. Men vad händer när gruvbolaget inte behöver Kirunaborna i samma utsträckning? När bolaget mer och mer förlitar sig på arbetskraft i form av fly-in fly-out? När fast anställda kan ersättas av entreprenörer? När allt färre händer behövs för att få upp malmen?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Luleå: Black Island Books, 2021. p. 152
Keywords
Kiruna, gruva, samhälle, makt
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-197370 (URN)978-91-88645-34-0 (ISBN)
Funder
Stiftelsen Längmanska kulturfondenNorrbotten County Council
Available from: 2021-09-30 Created: 2021-09-30 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Zawadzki, M. & Jensen, T. (2020). Bullying and the neoliberal university: A co-authored autoethnography. Management Learning, 51(4), 398-413
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bullying and the neoliberal university: A co-authored autoethnography
2020 (English)In: Management Learning, ISSN 1350-5076, E-ISSN 1461-7307, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 398-413Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of this article is to deepen the understanding of academic bullying as a consequence of neoliberal reforms in a university. Academics in contemporary universities have been put under pressure by the dominance of neoliberal processes, such as profit maximization, aggressive competitiveness, individualism or self-interest, generating undignifying social behaviours, including bullying practices. The presented story takes us – a junior academic and his conceptual encounterer – through our remembered experiences and field notes around a set of workday events in one European university reformed through managerial solutions as the object of the study. To do that, we employ co-authored analytic autoethnography to learn how neoliberal solutions reinforce paternalistic relationships as significant in career development, how such solutions enable the bullying of young academics and how neoliberalism in academia prevents young academics from contesting bullying. We are particularly interested in the bystander phenomenon: a person who shies away from taking action against bullying and thus strengthens bullying practices.

Keywords
Autoethnography, bullying, bystander, mobbing, neoliberalism, universities
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-181707 (URN)10.1177/1350507620920532 (DOI)000534674600001 ()
Available from: 2020-05-25 Created: 2020-05-25 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Jensen, T. & Sandström, J. (2020). Fly-in/fly-out and the fragmentation of communities: A case study of a uranium mine on indigenous land. Journal of Rural Studies, 78, 78-86
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fly-in/fly-out and the fragmentation of communities: A case study of a uranium mine on indigenous land
2020 (English)In: Journal of Rural Studies, ISSN 0743-0167, E-ISSN 1873-1392, Vol. 78, p. 78-86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article presents a case analysis of the work regime at a uranium mine, located on indigenous land in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. All the miners are flown in and out (FIFO), and with nearly half the workforce coming from different indigenous communities. We ask how the miners participate in and experience life as FIFO workers, and enrol the community concept in the analysis. Defining community as not merely a group of people or a place but also, in the wake of Tönnies’ classic work, as a matter of attitude, the case analysis reveals a community at work but fragmentation of indigenous communities off work.

Keywords
Capitalism, Community, Fly-in/fly-out, Gemeinschaft, Gesellschaft, Indigenous, Mining, Work regime, Regional & Urban Planning
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-186289 (URN)10.1016/j.jrurstud.2020.05.009 (DOI)000567798200008 ()
Available from: 2020-10-28 Created: 2020-10-28 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Alvehus, J. & Jensen, T. (2020). Organisation (2ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organisation
2020 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2020. p. 312 Edition: 2
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-182037 (URN)978-91-44-13217-4 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-05-28 Created: 2020-05-28 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Jensen, T. & Sandström, J. (2020). Organizing rocks: Actor–network theory and space. Organization, 27(5), 701-716
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing rocks: Actor–network theory and space
2020 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 701-716Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In an ethnography of the organizing of an underground mine, this article critically engages with actor–network theory’s theorizing of space, particularly the risk of drifting into spatial pluralism. Inspired by Annemarie Mol’s The Body Multiple, a space multiple approach is enrolled in which seemingly disparate enactments of the mining operations are understood in terms of coexistence and difference, inclusion and exclusion. Such an account attempts to cast aside a kind of neatness that jeopardizes the empirical openness that makes actor–network theory so fruitful to work with in organization studies dealing with spatial complexity.

Keywords
Actor–network theory, ethics, mining, organizing, politics, power, space
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-181706 (URN)10.1177/1350508419842715 (DOI)000566181700004 ()
Available from: 2020-05-25 Created: 2020-05-25 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
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