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Söderberg, Johan
Publications (10 of 42) Show all publications
Edvinsson, R., Franzén, B., Svensson, R. & Söderberg, J. (2023). History of Prices and Wages in Medieval Sweden: Volume I – Statistics and Analysis. Stockholm: Swedish Numismatic Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>History of Prices and Wages in Medieval Sweden: Volume I – Statistics and Analysis
2023 (English)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Swedish Numismatic Society, 2023. p. 213
Keywords
Swedish Prices Wages, Exchange & Interest, Rates in the Middle Ages, Inflation, Deflation of Prices
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History; Archaeology; Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224692 (URN)978-91-519-6080-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-20Bibliographically approved
Söderberg, J. (2019). Jordpris och jordränta i den senmedeltida krisen. Scandia, 85(2), 10-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Jordpris och jordränta i den senmedeltida krisen
2019 (Swedish)In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 85, no 2, p. 10-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Other Humanities History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-190299 (URN)
Available from: 2021-02-13 Created: 2021-02-13 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Franzén, B. & Söderberg, J. (2018). Hus, gårdar och gatubodar: Fastighetspriser i Stockholm och Arboga 1300–1600. Historisk Tidskrift, 138(2), 227-254
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hus, gårdar och gatubodar: Fastighetspriser i Stockholm och Arboga 1300–1600
2018 (Swedish)In: Historisk Tidskrift, ISSN 0345-469X, E-ISSN 2002-4827, Vol. 138, no 2, p. 227-254Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

I denna uppsats undersöks priserna på fastigheter i Stockholm och Arboga 1300–1600. Fast egendom var den viktigaste materiella resursen i det förindustriella samhället, har trots det prisutvecklingen på fastigheter tidigare inte studerats systematiskt för någon svensk stad. Stockholm och Arboga är de städer som lämpar sig bäst för en sådan undersökning, eftersom ett rikt källmaterial i form av jordeböcker och tänkeböcker har bevarats från dem. Dessa källor registrerar priser på och värderingar av olika slag av fastigheter som gjorts i samband med köp och försäljningar. Omkring 3 000 prisnoteringar ligger till grund för uppsatsen. Här visas bland annat att priserna i Stockholm sjönk svagt på lång sikt och att nedgången var kraftigare i samband med pestepidemier.

Abstract [en]

Houses, yards and sheds: Real property prices in Stockholm and Arboga, 1300-1600

The article explores real property prices in Swedish trading towns 1297-1600 based on c. 2900 transactions in Stockholm and the smaller town of Arboga. A consumer price index has been used to deflate nominal prices into real values. The analysis shows that houses made of both stone and wood became cheaper over time. In Isoo prices, the median price of a stone house in Stockholm was 343 Swedish marks in the period 1297-1449 compared to 184 marks in the period 1550-1600. For wooden houses the same downward trend was evident: a drop from 84 marks in the first period to 52 marks in the second period. Part of the price decline is due to the fact that building plots became smaller, which suggests an increase in population in Stockholm. Declining real wages of labourers also exerted a downward pressure on the cost of building a house. The slightly negative long-term trend in real property prices in Stockholm and Arboga, amounting to -0.3 and -0.1 percent per year, respectively, diverges from the strong decline in land prices in Eastern Sweden. This is an indication that the towns were less affected by the late medieval crisis than rural areas were. Plague outbreaks are shown to have affected real property prices in Stockholm, where prices fell during plague years, but quickly recovered afterwards. This pattern can be taken as an indication that real property prices were market prices that reacted to external shocks. The analysis also reports tentative results of real property prices as an indicator of economic inequality. The Gini coefficient for Stockholm varied between 0.55 in the period 1297-1449 to o.58 in the period 1450-1499. This is about the same level of inequality that has been calculated for Amsterdam in the mid-sixteenth century. The Gini coefficient for Arboga was also very similar to that of the Dutch towns taken as a whole. There is no clear trend in inequality over time in either Stockholm or Arboga. Finally, the article discusses trends in female ownership of real property by investigating if the position of women in the real property market deteriorated during the period of study. Female sellers of property amounted to nearly zo percent in Stockholm and Arboga, with no discernable time trend. Female property buyers were fewer, amounting to between three and six percent out of the total before 1500 and a somewhat higher percentage share in the sixteenth century.

Keywords
Medieval, sixteenth century, Stockholm, Arboga, real property, prices, economic inequality, Gini coefficient, plague, female ownership
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158044 (URN)000436049900003 ()
Projects
Välfärdens förhistoria: levnadsstandard, kris och skattetryck 1300–1600
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, P12-0176
Available from: 2018-07-07 Created: 2018-07-07 Last updated: 2022-05-10Bibliographically approved
Söderberg, J. (2015). Oceanic thirst? Food consumption in mediaeval Sweden. Scandinavian Economic History Review, 63(2), 135-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oceanic thirst? Food consumption in mediaeval Sweden
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Economic History Review, ISSN 0358-5522, E-ISSN 1750-2837, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 135-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article explores data on food consumption in mediaeval Sweden and discussesthe implications with regard to living standards. The key question is whether foodconsumption was more plentiful and/or more varied during the late mediaeval erathan during the early modern epoch. Based on two mediaeval account books,from the castles of Nyköping and Stegeborg, respectively, three conclusionsemerge. (1) Compared to mid-sixteenth century royal farms and other institutions,the mediaeval accounts suggest that food consumption was less plentiful butprobably more varied. (2) Over time, the proportion of beer in the budgets tendedto grow at the expense of meat. Late mediaeval landlords were pressed bydiminishing farmland rents. Swedish as well as English data are consistent with theview that lords were able to shift food expenditure from high-cost to low-costcalories. (3) Conspicuous food consumption did not play a prominent role indefining social hierarchy at Stegeborg castle in the late fifteenth century. By themid-sixteenth century this had changed. Low social rank now gave access only tocheap beer of a quality far below that which had applied half a century before.

Keywords
food, consumption, Sweden, medieval
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-121769 (URN)10.1080/03585522.2014.987315 (DOI)
Projects
Välfärdens förhistoria: levnadsstandard, kris och skattetryck 1300-1600
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, P2012:0176
Available from: 2015-10-15 Created: 2015-10-15 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Retsö, D. & Söderberg, J. (2015). The late-medieval crisis quantified: Real taxes in Sweden, 1320-1550. Scandinavian Journal of History, 40(1), 1-24
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The late-medieval crisis quantified: Real taxes in Sweden, 1320-1550
2015 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article aims to assess the size of secular taxes in medieval Sweden in real terms. The size of taxes is calculated as the quantity of butter and the number of oxen that could be bought for a given tax sum. In addition, nominal taxes are converted into grams of silver. Three distinctive periods are discerned: (1) a phase of low taxes 1320–1363; (2) a period of very high taxes from 1363 up to the Engelbrekt uprising in 1434; and (3) a new phase of low taxes up to the mid-16th century. A study of taxes at the regional and national levels makes it possible to evaluate the weight of the main regions of the kingdom (including Finland) in the central fiscal system at the end of the medieval era. A national overview of the situation around 1530 is put forward. During the period of high fiscal pressure in Sweden in the decades around 1400, taxes per taxpayer were much higher than those of England. In the low-tax periods, on the other hand, taxes were insufficient to create a working monopoly of violence. The result was drawn-out conflict between warlords for a large part of the 15th century and well into the 16th century.

Keywords
real taxes, Middle Ages, Sweden, late-medieval crisis
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-121772 (URN)10.1080/03468755.2014.976839 (DOI)000347543100001 ()
Projects
Välfärdens förhistoria: levnadsstandard, kris och skattetryck 1300-1600
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, P2012:0176
Available from: 2015-10-15 Created: 2015-10-15 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Söderberg, J. (2015). Vår världs ekonomiska historia: Del 1, Den förindustriella tiden (2ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vår världs ekonomiska historia: Del 1, Den förindustriella tiden
2015 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2015. p. 398 Edition: 2
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137412 (URN)9789144109633 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-01-06 Created: 2017-01-06 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Edvinsson, R., Blöndal, S. & Söderberg, J. (2014). A price index for residential property in Stockholm, 1875–2011. In: Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström (Ed.), House prices, stock returns, national accounts and the Riksband balance sheet 1620-2012: (pp. 63-100). Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A price index for residential property in Stockholm, 1875–2011
2014 (English)In: House prices, stock returns, national accounts and the Riksband balance sheet 1620-2012: / [ed] Rodney Edvinsson, Tor Jacobson, Daniel Waldenström, Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2014, p. 63-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Ekerlids förlag, 2014
Series
Historical Monetary and Financial Statistics for Sweden ; 2
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-111341 (URN)9789189612822 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-12-31 Created: 2014-12-31 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, U. & Söderberg, J. (2014). Department of Economic History. In: Gudrun Dahl, Mats Danielson (Ed.), Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University: 1964-2014 (pp. 91-109). Stockholm: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Department of Economic History
2014 (English)In: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University: 1964-2014 / [ed] Gudrun Dahl, Mats Danielson, Stockholm: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University , 2014, p. 91-109Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm University, 2014
National Category
Economic History
Research subject
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-110935 (URN)978-91-637-7121-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-12-19 Created: 2014-12-19 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Wetter, O., Pfister, C., Werner, J. P., Zorita, E., Wagner, S., Seneviratne, S. I., . . . Spring, J.-L. (2014). The year-long unprecedented European heat and drought of 1540-a worst case. Climatic Change, 125(3-4), 349-363
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The year-long unprecedented European heat and drought of 1540-a worst case
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2014 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 125, no 3-4, p. 349-363Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The heat waves of 2003 in Western Europe and 2010 in Russia, commonly labelled as rare climatic anomalies outside of previous experience, are often taken as harbingers of more frequent extremes in the global warming-influenced future. However, a recent reconstruction of spring-summer temperatures for WE resulted in the likelihood of significantly higher temperatures in 1540. In order to check the plausibility of this result we investigated the severity of the 1540 drought by putting forward the argument of the known soil desiccation-temperature feedback. Based on more than 300 first-hand documentary weather report sources originating from an area of 2 to 3 million km(2), we show that Europe was affected by an unprecedented 11-month-long Megadrought. The estimated number of precipitation days and precipitation amount for Central and Western Europe in 1540 is significantly lower than the 100-year minima of the instrumental measurement period for spring, summer and autumn. This result is supported by independent documentary evidence about extremely low river flows and Europe-wide wild-, forest- and settlement fires. We found that an event of this severity cannot be simulated by state-of-the-art climate models.

National Category
Economic History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-107019 (URN)10.1007/s10584-014-1184-2 (DOI)000339970700005 ()
Note

AuthorCount:32;

Available from: 2014-09-05 Created: 2014-09-02 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Söderberg, J. (2013). Nonuniform Staggered Prices and Output Persistence. Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, 45(6), 1017-1044
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nonuniform Staggered Prices and Output Persistence
2013 (English)In: Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, ISSN 0022-2879, E-ISSN 1538-4616, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1017-1044Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Staggered prices are a fundamental building block of New Keynesian dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models. In the standard model, prices are uniformly staggered, but recent empirical evidence suggests that deviations from uniform staggering are common. This paper analyzes how synchronization of price changes affects the response to monetary policy shocks. I find that even large deviations from uniform staggering have small effects on the response of output. Aggregate dynamics in a model of uniform staggering may serve well as an approximation to a more complicated model with some degree of synchronization in price setting.

Keywords
price setting, staggering, synchronization, persistence
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-93753 (URN)10.1111/jmcb.12042 (DOI)000323130500002 ()
Note

AuthorCount:1;

Available from: 2013-09-20 Created: 2013-09-16 Last updated: 2022-03-17Bibliographically approved
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