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Enfors Kautsky, ElinORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3719-792x
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Publications (10 of 20) Show all publications
Meacham, M., Norström, A. V., Peterson, G. D., Andersson, E., Bennett, E. M., Biggs, R. (., . . . Queiroz, C. (2022). Advancing research on ecosystem service bundles for comparative assessments and synthesis. Ecosystems and People, 18(1), 99-111
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advancing research on ecosystem service bundles for comparative assessments and synthesis
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2022 (English)In: Ecosystems and People, ISSN 2639-5908, E-ISSN 2639-5916, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 99-111Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social-ecological interactions have been shown to generate interrelated and reoccurring sets of ecosystem services, also known as ecosystem service bundles. Given the potential utility of the bundles concept, along with the recent surge in interest it is timely to reflect on the concept, its current use and potential for the future. Based on our ecosystem service bundle experience, expertise, and ecosystem service bundle analyses, we have found critical elements for advancing the utility of ecosystem service bundle concept and deepening its impact in the future. In this paper we 1) examine the different conceptualizations of the ecosystem service bundle concept; 2) show the range of benefits of using a bundles approach; 3) explore key issues for improving research on ecosystem service bundles, including indicators, scale, and drivers and relationships between ecosystem services; and 4) outline priorities for the future by facilitating comparisons of ecosystem service bundle research. 

Keywords
Ecosystem services, indicators, scale, drivers, multifunctionality
National Category
Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202765 (URN)10.1080/26395916.2022.2032356 (DOI)000758676200001 ()
Available from: 2022-03-10 Created: 2022-03-10 Last updated: 2022-12-07Bibliographically approved
Enfors-Kautsky, E., Järnberg, L., Quinlan, A. & Ryan, P. (2021). Wayfinder: a new generation of resilience practice. Ecology & Society, 26(2), Article ID 39.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wayfinder: a new generation of resilience practice
2021 (English)In: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 26, no 2, article id 39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Here, we introduce Wayfinder, a novel conceptual framework and a process design for resilience practice. Framed by the Anthropocene argument, and with an explicit social-ecological system focus, the purpose of Wayfinder is to help users navigate toward trajectories of sustainable development. We present the theoretical perspectives that underpin the Wayfinder framework, which draw together and synthesize multiple strands of contemporary resilience thinking. We also describe how we operationalize this framework through an action-oriented process that is designed to facilitate transformative change on the ground. Wayfinder's contribution to resilience theory and practice emerges from the combination of: (1) framing that enables users to address the complex sustainability challenges that we face today, (2) synthesis of recent key advances in resilience science into one comprehensive framework and process, (3) practical guidance that moves beyond an assessment of the current state of affairs and provides concrete advice for planning and action, and (4) emphasis on learning as a key mode of operation in the rapidly changing Anthropocene.

Keywords
Anthropocene, complexity, participatory approach, resilience assessment, resilience practice, social-ecological systems
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-196268 (URN)10.5751/ES-12176-260239 (DOI)000668219400004 ()
Available from: 2021-09-06 Created: 2021-09-06 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Järnberg, L., Enfors Kautsky, E., Dagerskog, L. & Olsson, P. (2018). Green niche actors navigating an opaque opportunity context: Prospects for a sustainable transformation of Ethiopian agriculture. Land use policy, 71, 409-421
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Green niche actors navigating an opaque opportunity context: Prospects for a sustainable transformation of Ethiopian agriculture
2018 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 71, p. 409-421Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Identifying trajectories of agricultural development that enable substantial increases in food production is of prime importance for food security and human development in Sub-Saharan Africa in general, and Ethiopia in particular. To ensure long-term welfare for people and landscapes, it is imperative that such agricultural transformations sustain and enhance the natural resource base upon which agriculture depends. To understand the prospects for a sustainable transformation of Ethiopian agriculture we develop a new conceptual framework for sustainability transformations that combines insights from the social-ecological transformations literature with research on socio-technical transitions and institutional entrepreneurship. Using this framework, we analyse the agricultural development trajectory currently envisaged by the government, as expressed in policy narratives and public institutions. We also explore the opportunity context facing non-state actors who promote sustainable intensification (referred to as green niche actors), as well as the strategies they employ to navigate this context and lever change in the direction they perceive as desirable. We find that current policies for agricultural development are primarily dominated by a narrative of Agriculture as an engine for growth, which focuses on the role of external inputs and commercialisation in boosting agricultural production so as to drive economic growth. While another narrative of Natural resource rehabilitation exists in policy, it sees natural resource management as a means of reducing degradation rather than a crucial component of enhanced and sustainable agricultural production, and the policies largely decouple issues of natural resources from issues of agricultural production. Institutional structures in the agricultural sector are found to reflect these discursive patterns. Further, the general institutional context in the country is characterised by strong government domination and rigid structures, which indicates an opaque opportunity context with limited opportunities for niche actors to have an impact. Given these challenging conditions, green niche actors adapt their strategies to fit the existing opportunity context and choose to collaborate closely with the government and the extension system. While this strategy offers the possibility of a direct impact at potentially large scale, it also leads to a range of trade-offs for the green niche actors and ultimately reduces the prospects for a sustainable agricultural transformation. In conclusion, an adaptation of the regime's proposed development trajectory for Ethiopian agriculture is, under current conditions, a more likely scenario than a more fundamental sustainability transformation, although options remain for more transformative action. Through the case of Ethiopian agriculture, this study adds insights into how transformation processes could play out in non-Western contexts where a strong state plays a dominant role, thus broadening the scope of empirical applications of the emerging research field on social-ecological transformations. We also demonstrate how the multilevel perspective from the transition literature and the concepts of opportunity context and situated agency from the literature on institutional entrepreneurship can be fruitfully merged with the social-ecological transformations literature, thereby moving towards a more comprehensive conceptual framework for analysing sustainability transformations.

Keywords
Transformation, Ethiopia, Agriculture, Sustainability, Agency, Opportunity context
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-153796 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2017.11.053 (DOI)000423643400038 ()
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Malmborg, K., Sinare, H., Enfors Kautsky, E., Ouedraogo, I. & Gordon, L. J. (2018). Mapping regional livelihood benefits from local ecosystem services assessments in rural Sahel. PLOS ONE, 13(2), Article ID e0192019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mapping regional livelihood benefits from local ecosystem services assessments in rural Sahel
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2018 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 2, article id e0192019Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most current approaches to landscape scale ecosystem service assessments rely on detailed secondary data. This type of data is seldom available in regions with high levels of poverty and strong local dependence on provisioning ecosystem services for livelihoods. We develop a method to extrapolate results from a previously published village scale ecosystem services assessment to a higher administrative level, relevant for land use decision making. The method combines remote sensing (using a hybrid classification method) and interviews with community members. The resulting landscape scale maps show the spatial distribution of five different livelihood benefits (nutritional diversity, income, insurance/saving, material assets and energy, and crops for consumption) that illustrate the strong multi-functionality of the Sahelian landscapes. The maps highlight the importance of a diverse set of sub-units of the landscape in supporting Sahelian livelihoods. We see a large potential in using the resulting type of livelihood benefit maps for guiding future land use decisions in the Sahel.

National Category
Environmental Sciences related to Agriculture and Land-use Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-153791 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0192019 (DOI)000423793400051 ()29389965 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Hänke, H., Barkmann, J., Coral, C., Enfors Kaustky, E. & Marggraf, R. (2017). Social-ecological traps hinder rural development in southwestern Madagascar. Ecology & Society, 22(1), Article ID 42.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social-ecological traps hinder rural development in southwestern Madagascar
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2017 (English)In: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The semiarid Mahafaly region in southwestern Madagascar is not only a unique biodiversity hotspot, but also one of the poorest regions in the world. Crop failures occur frequently, and despite a great number of rural development programs, no effective progress in terms of improved yields, agricultural income, or well-being among farming households has been observed. In addition to the severe development challenges in the region, environmental degradation and the loss of biodiversity are prevailing issues. This paper takes a social-ecological systems perspective to analyze why the region appears locked in poverty. Specifically, we address the social-ecological interaction between environmental factors such as low and variable precipitation, the lack of sustainable intensification in agriculture resulting in recalcitrant hunger, and several environmental degradation trends. The study is based on (i) longitudinal data from 150 farming households interviewed at high temporal resolution during the course of 2014, and (ii) extensive recall surveys from the southwestern Madagascar project region. The analysis reveals a complex interplay of pronounced seasonality in income generation due to recurrent droughts and crop failures making local farmers highly risk averse. This interplay results in a gradual depletion of environmental assets and hinders the accumulation of capital in the hands of smallholder farmers, and improvements in agricultural production even where environmental conditions would allow for it. As a result, households are insufficiently buffered and insured against repetitive income and food security shocks. This can be understood as a set of interacting, partly nested social-ecological traps, which entrench the Mahafalian smallholder population in deep poverty while the productivity of the environment declines. We provide new insights on the interplay between hunger, poverty, and loss of environmental assets in a global biodiversity hotspot. Finally, we propose a set of key issues that need to be considered to unlock this severe lock-in and enable transformation toward a more sustainable development in southwestern Madagascar.

Keywords
food security, livelihoods, Madagascar, poverty traps, social-ecological traps
National Category
Biological Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-143850 (URN)10.5751/ES-09130-220142 (DOI)000399397700047 ()
Available from: 2017-06-05 Created: 2017-06-05 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Sinare, H., Gordon, L. J. & Enfors Kautsky, E. (2016). Assessment of ecosystem services and benefits in village landscapes – A case study from Burkina Faso. Ecosystem Services, 21, 141-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of ecosystem services and benefits in village landscapes – A case study from Burkina Faso
2016 (English)In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 21, p. 141-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most methods to assess ecosystem services have been developed on large scales and depend on secondary data. Such data is scarce in rural areas with widespread poverty. Nevertheless, the population in these areas strongly depends on local ecosystem services for their livelihoods. These regions are in focus for substantial landscape investments that aim to alleviate poverty, but current methods fail to capture the vast range of ecosystem services supporting livelihoods, and can therefore not properly assess potential trade-offs and synergies among services that might arise from the interventions. We present a new method for classifying village landscapes into social-ecological patches (landscape units corresponding to local landscape perceptions), and for assessing provisioning ecosystem services and benefits to livelihoods from these patches. We apply the method, which include a range of participatory activities and satellite image analysis, in six villages across two regions in Burkina Faso. The results show significant and diverse contributions to livelihoods from six out of seven social-ecological patches. The results also show how provisioning ecosystem services, primarily used for subsistence, become more important sources of income during years when crops fail. The method is useful in many data poor regions, and the patch-approach allows for extrapolation across larger spatial scales with similar social-ecological systems.

Keywords
Agricultural landscapes, Livelihoods, Participatory approach, Poverty alleviation, Sahel, Smallholder farming
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Resources Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-133915 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.08.004 (DOI)000385526300015 ()
Available from: 2016-09-22 Created: 2016-09-22 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Haenke, H., Börjeson, L., Hylander, K. & Enfors-Kautsky, E. (2016). Drought tolerant species dominate as rainfall and tree cover returns in the West African Sahel. Land use policy, 59, 111-120
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Drought tolerant species dominate as rainfall and tree cover returns in the West African Sahel
2016 (English)In: Land use policy, ISSN 0264-8377, E-ISSN 1873-5754, Vol. 59, p. 111-120Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

After the severe droughts in the 1970s and 1980s, and subsequent debates about desertification, analyses of satellite images reveal that the West African Sahel has become greener again. In this paper we report a study on changes in tree cover and tree species composition in three village landscapes in northern Burkina Faso, based on a combination of methods: tree density change detection using aerial photos and satellite images, a tree species inventory including size class distribution analysis, and interviews with local farmers about woody vegetation changes. Our results show a decrease in tree cover in the 1970s followed by an increase since the mid-1980s, a pattern correlating with the temporal trends in rainfall as well as remotely sensed greening in the region. However, both the inventory and interview data shows that the species composition has changed substantially towards a higher dominance of drought-resistant and exotic species. This shift, occurring during a period of increasing annual precipitation, points to the complexity of current landscape changes and questions rain as the sole primary driver of the increase in tree cover. We propose that the observed changes in woody vegetation (densities, species composition and spatial distribution) are mediated by changes in land use, including intensification and promotion of drought tolerant and fast growing species. Our findings, which indicate a rather surprising trajectory of land cover change, highlight the importance of studies that integrate evidence of changes in tree density and species composition to complement our understanding of land use and vegetation change trajectories in the Sahel obtained from satellite images. We conclude that a better understanding of the social-ecological relations and emerging land use trajectories that produce new types of agroforestry parklands in the region is of crucial importance for designing suitable policies for climate change adaptation, biodiversity conservation and the sustainable delivery of ecosystem services that benefit local livelihoods in one of the world's poorest regions.

Keywords
Greening, Agroforestry parklands, Neem tree, Woody species diversity, Sahel, Burkina Faso
National Category
Social and Economic Geography Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-136719 (URN)10.1016/j.landusepol.2016.08.023 (DOI)000387519600010 ()
Available from: 2016-12-19 Created: 2016-12-14 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Bousquet, F., Botta, A., Alinovi, L., Barreteau, O., Bossio, D., Brown, K., . . . Staver, C. (2016). Resilience and development: mobilizing for transformation. Ecology & Society, 21(3), Article ID 40.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resilience and development: mobilizing for transformation
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2016 (English)In: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 21, no 3, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In 2014, the Third International Conference on the resilience of social-ecological systems chose the theme resilience and development: mobilizing for transformation. The conference aimed specifically at fostering an encounter between the experiences and thinking focused on the issue of resilience through a social and ecological system perspective, and the experiences focused on the issue of resilience through a development perspective. In this perspectives piece, we reflect on the outcomes of the meeting and document the differences and similarities between the two perspectives as discussed during the conference, and identify bridging questions designed to guide future interactions. After the conference, we read the documents (abstracts, PowerPoints) that were prepared and left in the conference database by the participants (about 600 contributions), and searched the web for associated items, such as videos, blogs, and tweets from the conference participants. All of these documents were assessed through one lens: what do they say about resilience and development? Once the perspectives were established, we examined different themes that were significantly addressed during the conference. Our analysis paves the way for new collective developments on a set of issues: (1) Who declares/assign/cares for the resilience of what, of whom? (2) What are the models of transformations and how do they combine the respective role of agency and structure? (3) What are the combinations of measurement and assessment processes? (4) At what scale should resilience be studied? Social transformations and scientific approaches are coconstructed. For the last decades, development has been conceived as a modernization process supported by scientific rationality and technical expertise. The definition of a new perspective on development goes with a negotiation on a new scientific approach. Resilience is presently at the center of this negotiation on a new science for development.

Keywords
development, perspective, resilience, social-ecological systems, transdisciplinarity
National Category
Biological Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-136232 (URN)10.5751/ES-08754-210340 (DOI)000385720400039 ()
Available from: 2016-12-12 Created: 2016-12-01 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Moore, M.-L., Tjornbo, O., Enfors, E., Knapp, C., Hodbod, J., Baggio, J. A., . . . Biggs, D. (2014). Studying the complexity of change: toward an analytical framework for understanding deliberate social-ecological transformations. Ecology & Society, 19(4), 54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying the complexity of change: toward an analytical framework for understanding deliberate social-ecological transformations
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2014 (English)In: Ecology & Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 54-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Faced with numerous seemingly intractable social and environmental challenges, many scholars and practitioners are increasingly interested in understanding how to actively engage and transform the existing systems holding such problems in place. Although a variety of analytical models have emerged in recent years, most emphasize either the social or ecological elements of such transformations rather than their coupled nature. To address this, first we have presented a definition of the core elements of a social-ecological system (SES) that could potentially be altered in a transformation. Second, we drew on insights about transformation from three branches of literature focused on radical change, i.e., social movements, socio-technical transitions, and social innovation, and gave consideration to the similarities and differences with the current studies by resilience scholars. Drawing on these findings, we have proposed a framework that outlines the process and phases of transformative change in an SES. Future research will be able to utilize the framework as a tool for analyzing the alteration of social-ecological feedbacks, identifying critical barriers and leverage points and assessing the outcome of social-ecological transformations.

Keywords
resilience, social-ecological systems, social innovation, social movements, transformation, transition management
National Category
Biological Sciences Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-113984 (URN)10.5751/ES-06966-190454 (DOI)000347440700037 ()
Note

AuthorCount:9;

Available from: 2015-02-17 Created: 2015-02-16 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Rockström, J., Falkenmark, M., Folke, C., Lannerstad, M., Barron, J., Enfors, E., . . . Pahl-Wostl, C. (2014). Water resilience for human prosperity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Water resilience for human prosperity
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2014 (English)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The world's human population now constitutes the largest driving force of changes to the biosphere. Emerging water challenges require new ideas for governance and management of water resources in the context of rapid global change. This book presents a new approach to water resources, addressing global sustainability and focusing on socio-ecological resilience to changes. Topics covered include the risks of unexpected change, human impacts and dependence on global water, the prospects for feeding the world's population by 2050, and a pathway for the future. The book's innovative and integrated approach links green and blue freshwater with terrestrial and aquatic ecosystem functions and use. It also links changes arising from land-use alteration with the impacts of those changes on social-ecological systems and ecosystem services. This is an important, state-of-the-art resource for academic researchers and water resource professionals, and a key reference for graduate students studying water resource governance and management.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. p. 292
Keywords
water, drinking water, water supply, history
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-106664 (URN)10.1017/CBO9781139162463 (DOI)9781107024199 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-08-14 Created: 2014-08-14 Last updated: 2022-10-03Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3719-792x

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