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Troye-Blomberg, MaritaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2804-0325
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Publications (10 of 106) Show all publications
Troye-Blomberg, M., Arama, C., Quin, J., Bujila, I. & Östlund Farrants, A.-K. (2020). What will studies of Fulani individuals naturally exposed to malaria teach us about protective immunity to malaria?. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, 92(4), Article ID e12932.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What will studies of Fulani individuals naturally exposed to malaria teach us about protective immunity to malaria?
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2020 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Immunology, ISSN 0300-9475, E-ISSN 1365-3083, Vol. 92, no 4, article id e12932Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are an estimated over 200 million yearly cases of malaria worldwide. Despite concerted international effort to combat the disease, it still causes approximately half a million deaths every year, the majority of which are young children with Plasmodium falciparum infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Successes are largely attributed to malaria prevention strategies, such as insecticide-treated mosquito nets and indoor spraying, as well as improved access to existing treatments. One important hurdle to new approaches for the treatment and prevention of malaria is our limited understanding of the biology of Plasmodium infection and its complex interaction with the immune system of its human host. Therefore, the elimination of malaria in Africa not only relies on existing tools to reduce malaria burden, but also requires fundamental research to develop innovative approaches. Here, we summarize our discoveries from investigations of ethnic groups of West Africa who have different susceptibility to malaria.

Keywords
B cells, dendritic cells, inflammation, macrophages, monocytes, parasitic, T cells
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-187673 (URN)10.1111/sji.12932 (DOI)000576528300014 ()32652609 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-12-21 Created: 2020-12-21 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Kulpraneet, M., Limtrakul, A., Thanomtham, P., Taemaitree, N., Puttikamonkul, S., Pongsunk, S., . . . Tangteerawatana, P. (2019). Analysis of IL-4 promoter and VNTR polymorphisms in Thai patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. Tropical Biomedicine, 36(4), 874-882
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of IL-4 promoter and VNTR polymorphisms in Thai patients with pulmonary tuberculosis
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2019 (English)In: Tropical Biomedicine, ISSN 0127-5720, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 874-882Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tuberculosis (TB) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Thailand. Cytokines play important roles in defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Interleukin (IL)-4 is one of the anti-inflammatory cytokines and has been found to be elevated in TB patients. The common polymorphisms in IL-4 gene, including IL-4-590C/T, IL-4-33C/T, and IL-4-variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) intron 3 have been reported to be associated with risk for some diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible associations between the above mentioned three common functional polymorphisms in the IL-4 gene in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in a Thai population. Forty three patients with PTB and 90 healthy control subjects were studied. The three common polymorphisms of the IL-4 gene were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The allele and genotype frequencies of IL-4-590 C/T, -33 C/T, VNTR intron 3 polymorphisms did not show significant differences between PTB patients and healthy controls ( genotype: p=0.88, p=0.92, p=0.40; allele: p=0.38, p=0.44, p=0.53, respectively). However, the allele distribution of the IL-4 -590 C, -33 C, and VNTR R3 was higher among PTB patients (25.58%, 25.58%, 25.58%, respectively) than among control subjects (20%, 20.48%, 19.44%, respectively). This may suggest that IL-4-590C/T, -33C/T and VNTR intron 3 might play a role in susceptibility to PTB. A larger cohort may possibly help conclude our findings.

National Category
Infectious Medicine Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-177618 (URN)000500954500008 ()
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Arama, C., Quin, J. E., Kouriba, B., Östlund Farrants, A.-K., Troye-Blomberg, M. & Doumbo, O. K. (2018). Epigenetics and Malaria Susceptibility/Protection: A Missing Piece of the Puzzle. Frontiers in Immunology, 9, Article ID 1733.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Epigenetics and Malaria Susceptibility/Protection: A Missing Piece of the Puzzle
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 9, article id 1733Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A better understanding of stable changes in regulation of gene expression that result from epigenetic events is of great relevance in the development of strategies to prevent and treat infectious diseases. Histone modification and DNA methylation are key epigenetic mechanisms that can be regarded as marks, which ensure an accurate transmission of the chromatin states and gene expression profiles over generations of cells. There is an increasing list of these modifications, and the complexity of their action is just beginning to be understood. It is clear that the epigenetic landscape plays a fundamental role in most biological processes that involve the manipulation and expression of DNA. Although the molecular mechanism of gene regulation is relatively well understood, the hierarchical order of events and dependencies that lead to protection against infection remain largely unknown. In this review, we propose that host epigenetics is an essential, though relatively under studied, factor in the protection or susceptibility to malaria.

Keywords
epigenetic, immunity, malaria, falciparum, protection, susceptibility
National Category
Biological Sciences Microbiology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-158903 (URN)10.3389/fimmu.2018.01733 (DOI)000440720400001 ()
Available from: 2018-08-20 Created: 2018-08-20 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Quin, J. E., Bujila, I., Chérif, M., Sanou, G. S., Qu, Y., Homann, M. V., . . . Östlund Farrants, A.-K. (2017). Major transcriptional changes observed in the Fulani, an ethnic group less susceptible to malaria. eLIFE, 6, Article ID e29156.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Major transcriptional changes observed in the Fulani, an ethnic group less susceptible to malaria
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2017 (English)In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 6, article id e29156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Fulani ethnic group has relatively better protection from Plasmodium falciparum malaria, as reflected by fewer symptomatic cases of malaria, lower infection rates, and lower parasite densities compared to sympatric ethnic groups. However, the basis for this lower susceptibility to malaria by the Fulani is unknown. The incidence of classic malaria resistance genes are lower in the Fulani than in other sympatric ethnic populations, and targeted SNP analyses of other candidate genes involved in the immune response to malaria have not been able to account for the observed difference in the Fulani susceptibility to P.falciparum. Therefore, we have performed a pilot study to examine global transcription and DNA methylation patterns in specific immune cell populations in the Fulani to elucidate the mechanisms that confer the lower susceptibility to P.falciparum malaria. When we compared uninfected and infected Fulani individuals, in contrast to uninfected and infected individuals from the sympatric ethnic group Mossi, we observed a key difference: a strong transcriptional response was only detected in the monocyte fraction of the Fulani, where over 1000 genes were significantly differentially expressed upon P.falciparum infection.

National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-148886 (URN)10.7554/eLife.29156 (DOI)000412360800001 ()
Available from: 2017-11-21 Created: 2017-11-21 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Boström, S., Schmiegelow, C., Abu Abed, U., Minja, D. T., Lusingu, J., Brinkmann, V., . . . Amulic, B. (2017). Neutrophil alterations in pregnancy-associated malaria and induction of neutrophil chemotaxis by Plasmodium falciparum. Parasite immunology (Print), 39(6), Article ID UNSP e12433.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Neutrophil alterations in pregnancy-associated malaria and induction of neutrophil chemotaxis by Plasmodium falciparum
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2017 (English)In: Parasite immunology (Print), ISSN 0141-9838, E-ISSN 1365-3024, Vol. 39, no 6, article id UNSP e12433Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) is a severe form of the disease caused by sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) in the developing placenta. Pathogenesis of PAM is partially based on immunopathology, with frequent monocyte infiltration into the placenta. Neutrophils are abundant blood cells that are essential for immune defence but may also cause inflammatory pathology. Their role in PAM remains unclear. We analysed neutrophil alterations in the context of PAM to better understand their contribution to disease development. Pregnant women exposed to Plasmodium falciparum had decreased numbers of circulating neutrophils. Placental-like BeWo cells stimulated with malaria parasites produced the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 and recruited neutrophils in a trans-well assay. Finally, immunostaining of a PAM placenta confirmed neutrophil accumulation in the intervillous space. Our data indicate neutrophils may play a role in placental malaria and should be more closely examined as an etiological agent in the pathophysiology of disease.

Keywords
IL-8, neutrophils, placenta, Plasmodium falciparum, pregnancy
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-145252 (URN)10.1111/pim.12433 (DOI)000403537900006 ()
Available from: 2017-07-27 Created: 2017-07-27 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Howard, J., Loizon, S., Tyler, C. J., Duluc, D., Moser, B., Mechain, M., . . . Mamani-Matsuda, M. (2017). The Antigen-Presenting Potential of V gamma 9V delta 2 T Cells During Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage Infection. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 215(10), 1569-1579
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Antigen-Presenting Potential of V gamma 9V delta 2 T Cells During Plasmodium falciparum Blood-Stage Infection
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Infectious Diseases, ISSN 0022-1899, E-ISSN 1537-6613, Vol. 215, no 10, p. 1569-1579Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During Plasmodium falciparum infections, erythrocyte-stage parasites inhibit dendritic cell maturation and function, compromising effective antimalarial adaptive immunity. Human V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells can act in vitro as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and induce alpha beta T-cell activation. However, the relevance of this activity in vivo has remained elusive. Because V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells are activated during the early immune response against P. falciparum infection, we investigated whether they could contribute to the instruction of adaptive immune responses toward malaria parasites. In P. falciparum-infected patients, V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells presented increased surface expression of APC-associated markers HLA-DR and CD86. In response to infected red blood cells in vitro, V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells upregulated surface expression of HLA-DR, HLA-ABC, CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86, induced naive alpha beta T-cell responses, and cross-presented soluble prototypical protein to antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. Our findings qualify V gamma 9V delta 2 T cells as alternative APCs, which could be harnessed for therapeutic interventions and vaccine design.

Keywords
gamma delta T cells, malaria, antigen presentation, Plasmodium falciparum infection
National Category
Biological Sciences Immunology in the medical area Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-144835 (URN)10.1093/infdis/jix149 (DOI)000402821800012 ()
Available from: 2017-07-07 Created: 2017-07-07 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Amoako-Sakyi, D., Adukpo, S., Kusi, K. A., Dodoo, D., Ofori, M. F., Adjei, G. O., . . . Gyan, B. A. (2016). A STAT6 Intronic Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism is Associated with Clinical Malaria in Ghanaian Children. Genetics and Epigenetics, 8, 7-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A STAT6 Intronic Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism is Associated with Clinical Malaria in Ghanaian Children
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2016 (English)In: Genetics and Epigenetics, ISSN 1179-237X, Vol. 8, p. 7-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Malaria pathogenesis may be influenced by IgE responses and cytokine cross-regulation. Several mutations in the IL-4/STAT6 signaling pathway can alter cytokine cross-regulation and IgE responses during a Plasmodium falciparum malarial infection. This study investigated the relationship between a STAT6 intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs3024974), total IgE, cytokines, and malaria severity in 238 Ghanaian children aged between 0.5 and 13 years. Total IgE and cytokine levels were measured by ELISA, while genotyping was done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Compared with healthy controls, heterozygosity protected against clinical malaria: uncomplicated malaria (odds ratios [OR] = 0.13, P < 0.001), severe malarial anemia (OR = 0.18, P, 0.001), and cerebral malaria (OR = 0.39, P = 0.022). Levels of total IgE significantly differed among malaria phenotypes (P = 0.044) and rs3024974 genotypes (P = 0.037). Neither cytokine levels nor IL-6/IL-10 ratios were associated with malaria phenotypes or rs3024974 genotypes. This study suggests a role for rs3024974 in malaria pathogenesis and offers further insights into an IL-4/STAT6 pathway mutation in malaria pathogenesis.

Keywords
rs3024974, STAT6, SNP, Ghana, intron, IgE, malaria
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-136956 (URN)10.4137/GEG.S38307 (DOI)000387754400002 ()27279750 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-19 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Yman, V., White, M. T., Rono, J., Arca, B., Osier, F. H., Troye-Blomberg, M., . . . Färnert, A. (2016). Antibody acquisition models: A new tool for serological surveillance of malaria transmission intensity. Scientific Reports, 6, Article ID 19472.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antibody acquisition models: A new tool for serological surveillance of malaria transmission intensity
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 19472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Serology has become an increasingly important tool for the surveillance of a wide range of infectious diseases. It has been particularly useful to monitor malaria transmission in elimination settings where existing metrics such as parasite prevalence and incidence of clinical cases are less sensitive. Seroconversion rates, based on antibody prevalence to Plasmodium falciparum asexual blood-stage antigens, provide estimates of transmission intensity that correlate with entomological inoculation rates but lack precision in settings where seroprevalence is still high. Here we present a new and widely applicable method, based on cross-sectional data on individual antibody levels. We evaluate its use as a sero-surveillance tool in a Tanzanian setting with declining malaria prevalence. We find that the newly developed mathematical models produce more precise estimates of transmission patterns, are robust in high transmission settings and when sample sizes are small, and provide a powerful tool for serological evaluation of malaria transmission intensity.

National Category
Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-127347 (URN)10.1038/srep19472 (DOI)000369380100001 ()26846726 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2022-09-15Bibliographically approved
Cherif, M., Amoako-Sakyi, D., Dolo, A., Pearson, J.-O., Gyan, B., Obiri-Yeboah, D., . . . Bakary, M. (2016). Distribution of Fc gamma R gene polymorphisms among two sympatric populations in Mali: differing allele frequencies, associations with malariometric indices and implications for genetic susceptibility to malaria. Malaria Journal, 15, Article ID 29.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Distribution of Fc gamma R gene polymorphisms among two sympatric populations in Mali: differing allele frequencies, associations with malariometric indices and implications for genetic susceptibility to malaria
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2016 (English)In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 15, article id 29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Genetic polymorphisms in the complex gene cluster encoding human Fc-gamma receptors (Fc gamma Rs) may influence malaria susceptibility and pathogenesis. Studying genetic susceptibility to malaria is ideal among sympatric populations because the distribution of polymorphic genes among such populations can help in the identification malaria candidate genes. This study determined the distribution of three FcyRs single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (Fc gamma RIIB-rs1050519, Fc gamma RIIC-rs3933769 and Fc gamma RIIIA-rs396991) among sympatric Fulani and Dogon children with uncomplicated malaria. The association of these SNPs with clinical, malariometric and immunological indices was also tested. Methods: This study involved 242 Fulani and Dogon volunteers from Mali age under 15 years. All SNPs were genotyped with predesigned TaqMan (R) SNP Genotyping Assays. Genotypic and allelic distribution of SNPs was compared across ethnic groups using the Fisher exact test. Variations in clinical, malariometric and immunologic indices between groups were tested with Kruskal-Wallis H, Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher exact test where appropriate. Results: The study confirmed known malariometric and immunologic differences between sympatric Fulani and non-Fulani tribes. Parasite density was lower in the Fulani than the Dogon (p < 0.0001). The mutant allele of Fc gamma RIIC (rs3933769) was found more frequently in the Fulani than the Dogon (p < 0.0001) while that of Fc gamma RIIIA (rs396991) occurred less frequently in the Fulani than Dogon (p = 0.0043). The difference in the mutant allele frequency of Fc gamma RIIB (rs1050519) between the two ethnic groups was however not statistically significant (p = 0.064). The mutant allele of rs396991 was associated with high malaria-specific IgG1 and IgG3 in the entire study population and Dogon tribe, p = 0.023 and 0.015, respectively. Parasite burden was lower in carriers of the Fc gamma RIIC (rs3933769) mutant allele than non-carriers in the entire study population (p < 0.0001). Carriers of this allele harboured less than half the parasites found in non-carriers. Conclusion: Differences in the allelic frequencies of rs3933769 and rs396991 among Fulani and Dogon indirectly suggest that these SNPs may influence malaria susceptibility and pathogenesis in the study population. The high frequency of the Fc gamma RIIC (rs3933769) mutant allele in the Fulani and its subsequent association with low parasite burden in the entire study population is noteworthy.

National Category
Biological Sciences Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-126898 (URN)10.1186/s12936-015-1082-8 (DOI)000368398000001 ()26785902 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-16 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Kumsiri, R., Troye-Blomberg, M., Pattanapanyasat, K., Krudsood, S. & Maneerat, Y. (2016). IgE low affinity receptor (CD23) expression, Plasmodium falciparum specific IgE and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production in Thai uncomplicated and severe falciparum malaria patients. Acta Tropica, 154, 25-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>IgE low affinity receptor (CD23) expression, Plasmodium falciparum specific IgE and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production in Thai uncomplicated and severe falciparum malaria patients
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2016 (English)In: Acta Tropica, ISSN 0001-706X, E-ISSN 1873-6254, Vol. 154, p. 25-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies have suggested that Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) specific IgE in the form of immune complexes crosslinking the low-affinity receptor (CD23) on monocyte results in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO) production. However, the roles of these parameters in severity and immune protection are still unclear. This study aimed to determine the association between CD23 expression on monocytes, plasma soluble CD23 (sCD23), total IgE, malaria-specific IgE and IgG, and TNF-alpha levels in P. falciparum infected patients. We evaluated 64 uncomplicated (UC) and 25 severe patients (S), admitted at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Mahidol University, and 34 healthy controls (C) enrolled in 2001. Flow cytometry and enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) demonstrated that trends of the CD23 expression, levels of sCD23 and specific IgE were higher in the S group as compared to those in the UC and C groups. Plasma levels of P. falciparum specific IgE in the UC (p = 0.011) and S groups (p = 0.025) were significantly higher than those in C group. In contrast the TNF-alpha levels tended to be higher in the UC than those in the S (p = 0343) and significantly higher than those in C (p = 0.004) groups. The specific IgG levels in UC were significantly higher than those in S and C (p < 0.001) groups. At admission, a strong significant negative correlation was found between specific IgG and sCD23 (r = -0.762, p = 0.028), and TNF-alpha and IgE-IgG complexes (r=-0.715, p = 0.002). Significant positive correlations between levels of specific IgE and TNF-alpha (r=0.575, p = 0.010); and sCD23 (r=0.597, p = 0.000) were also observed. In conclusion, our data suggest that CD23 expression and malaria-specific IgE levels may be involved in the severity of the disease while TNF-alpha and the malaria-specific IgG may correlate with protection against falciparum malaria.

Keywords
CD23, P. falciparum, TNF-alpha, IgE
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Immunology Immunology in the medical area
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-127352 (URN)10.1016/j.actatropica.2015.10.017 (DOI)000369203000004 ()26519199 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-11 Created: 2016-03-02 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2804-0325

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