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Koptjevskaja-Tamm, M. & Vejdemo, S. (2021). Prototype semantics and cross-linguistic research on categorization. In: James Stanlaw (Ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Linguistic Anthropology: . Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prototype semantics and cross-linguistic research on categorization
2021 (English)In: The International Encyclopedia of Linguistic Anthropology / [ed] James Stanlaw, Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2021Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Linguistic expressions are instrumental in categorizing the world. Prototype semantics holds that categorization is centered on best exemplars, or prototypes, with other potential members of the categories evaluated in accordance with their similarity to it. Prototype effects have been documented in language acquisition and learning, reaction times, priming effects, saliency in listing tasks, etc. The debated issues include what the prototype really is and whether it changes with context. An important extension of categorization research concerns cross-linguistic comparison: what is universal and what is language specific in linguistic categorization and to what extent the emerging categories can be accounted for by reference to prototypes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2021
Keywords
cross-linguistic comparison, prototypes, lexical typology, semantics, categorization
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220763 (URN)10.1002/9781118786093.iela0326 (DOI)9781118786765 (ISBN)9781118786093 (ISBN)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, SAB17-0588:1
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2023-09-15Bibliographically approved
Vejdemo, S. (2018). Lexical change often begins and ends in semantic peripheries Evidence from color linguistics. Pragmatics & Cognition, 25(1), 50-85
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lexical change often begins and ends in semantic peripheries Evidence from color linguistics
2018 (English)In: Pragmatics & Cognition, ISSN 0929-0907, E-ISSN 1569-9943, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 50-85Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The article discusses semantic change and lexical replacement processes in the color domain, based on color naming studies in seven Germanic languages (where diachronic intra-linguistic development is inferred from cross-linguistic synchronic studies) and from different generations of speakers in a single language (Swedish). Change in the color domain often begins and ends in conceptual peripheries, and I argue that this perspective is suitable for other semantic domains as well.

Keywords
color linguistics, lexical typology, lexical semantics, cognitive linguistics, Germanic languages, Swedish
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-171212 (URN)10.1075/pc.00005.vej (DOI)000471270700004 ()
Available from: 2019-07-28 Created: 2019-07-28 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Vejdemo, S. (2017). Triangulating Perspectives on Lexical Replacement: From Predictive Statistical Models to Descriptive Color Linguistics. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Triangulating Perspectives on Lexical Replacement: From Predictive Statistical Models to Descriptive Color Linguistics
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this thesis is to investigate lexical replacement processes from several complementary perspectives. It does so through three studies, each with a different scope and time depth.

The first study (chapter 3) takes a high time depth perspective and investigates factors that affect the rate (likelihood) of lexical replacement in the core vocabulary of 98 Indo-European language varieties through a multiple linear regression model. The chapter shows that the following factors predict part of the rate of lexical replacement for non-grammatical concepts: frequency, the number of synonyms and senses, and how imageable the concept is in the mind.

What looks like a straightforward lexical replacement at a high time depth perspective is better understood as several intertwined gradual processes of lexical change at lower time depths. The second study (chapter 5) narrows the focus to seven closely-related Germanic language varieties (English, German, Bernese, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, and Icelandic) and a single semantic domain, namely color.  The chapter charts several lexical replacement and change processes in the pink and purple area of color space through experiments with 146 speakers.

The third study (chapter 6) narrows the focus even more, to two generations of speakers of a single language, Swedish. It combines experimental data on how the two age groups partition and label the color space in general, and pink and purple in particular, with more detailed data on lexical replacement and change from interviews, color descriptions in historical and contemporary dictionaries, as well as botanical lexicons, and historical fiction corpora.

This thesis makes a descriptive, methodological and theoretical contribution to the study of lexical replacement. Taken together, the different perspectives highlight the usefulness of method triangulation in approaching the complex phenomenon of lexical replacement.

 

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University, 2017. p. 231
Keywords
semantics, lexical typology, semantic typology, historical linguistics, historical semantics, lexical replacement, lexical change, rate of lexical replacement, color, regression models, Swedish, English, German, Danish, Norwegian, Icelandic, method triangulation
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137874 (URN)978-91-7649-644-2 (ISBN)978-91-7649-645-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-03-03, hörsal 4, hus B, Universitetsvägen 10 B, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-02-08 Created: 2017-01-12 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Vejdemo, S. & Vandewinkel, S. (2016). Extended uses of body-related temperature expressions. In: Päivi Juvonen, Katarina Koptjevskaja-Tamm (Ed.), The Lexical Typology of Semantic Shifts: (pp. 249-284). Mouton de Gruyter
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extended uses of body-related temperature expressions
2016 (English)In: The Lexical Typology of Semantic Shifts / [ed] Päivi Juvonen, Katarina Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Mouton de Gruyter, 2016, p. 249-284Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The chapter presents the results of a cross-linguistic study where we examined body-related temperature expressions (brtes), like “warm heart” and “cold eyes”, in English, Ibibio, Japanese, Kannada, Mandarin Chinese, Ojibwe, and Swedish. We found that all the studied languages have brtes, even metaphor-poor Ojibwe, and that certain body related expressions recur in the brtes, mostly ‘heart’, ‘head’, ‘voice’, ‘smile’ and ‘eyes’. We found support for two conceptual metaphors: control is cold/lack of control is hot and caring is warm/uncaring is cold. The temperature scales were found to be translated to scalar target domains, mostly emotions. However, we found little support for the hypothesis that local cultural/climate factors, such as the temperature related humoral theory or the mean temperature of a region, would affect the brtes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mouton de Gruyter, 2016
Series
Cognitive Linguistics Research, ISSN 1861-4132 ; 58
Keywords
Linguistics, temperature, metaphor, Swedish, Kannada, Chinese, Ibibio, English
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-139545 (URN)10.1515/9783110377675-009 (DOI)9783110377521 (ISBN)9783110377675 (ISBN)
Projects
The Linguistics of Temperature
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2009-2011
Available from: 2017-02-08 Created: 2017-02-08 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Vejdemo, S. & Hörberg, T. (2016). Semantic Factors Predict the Rate of Lexical Replacement of Content Words. PLOS ONE, 11(1), Article ID e0147924.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Semantic Factors Predict the Rate of Lexical Replacement of Content Words
2016 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 1, article id e0147924Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The rate of lexical replacement estimates the diachronic stability of word forms on the basis of how frequently a proto-language word is replaced or retained in its daughter languages. Lexical replacement rate has been shown to be highly related to word class and word frequency. In this paper, we argue that content words and function words behave differently with respect to lexical replacement rate, and we show that semantic factors predict the lexical replacement rate of content words. For the 167 content items in the Swadesh list, data was gathered on the features of lexical replacement rate, word class, frequency, age of acquisition, synonyms, arousal, imageability and average mutual information, either from published databases or gathered from corpora and lexica. A linear regression model shows that, in addition to frequency, synonyms, senses and imageability are significantly related to the lexical replacement rate of content words–in particular the number of synonyms that a word has. The model shows no differences in lexical replacement rate between word classes, and outperforms a model with word class and word frequency predictors only.

Keywords
lexical semantics, language change, regression analysis, Swadesh list
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-126494 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0147924 (DOI)000369528400055 ()
Available from: 2016-02-04 Created: 2016-02-04 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Lockwood, H. & Vejdemo, S. (2015). “There is no thermostat in the forest”: the Ojibwe temperature term system. In: Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm (Ed.), The Linguistics of Temperature: (pp. 721-741). Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“There is no thermostat in the forest”: the Ojibwe temperature term system
2015 (English)In: The Linguistics of Temperature / [ed] Maria Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015, p. 721-741Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter deals with the temperature system of Eastern Ojibwe, an Algonquian language spoken in Canada and the US. The system differentiates lexically and morphologically between tactile, ambient and personal feeling temperature expressions. It also handles the cooling and warming parts of the temperature scale(s) differently. We also briefly discuss how sociological change in the conceptualisation of temperature has had an impact on morphological changes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2015
Series
Typological Studies in Language, ISSN 0167-7373 ; 107
Keywords
Ojibwe, temperature, semantics
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-133521 (URN)10.1075/tsl.107.23loc (DOI)9789027206886 (ISBN)9789027269171 (ISBN)
Projects
The Linguistics of Temperature
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2008-2067
Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2022-11-21Bibliographically approved
Vejdemo, S., Levisen, C., van Scherpenberg, C., Beck, T. G., Naess, A., Zimmermann, M., . . . Whelpton, M. (2015). Two kinds of pink: development and difference in Germanic colour semantics. Language sciences (Oxford), 49, 19-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Two kinds of pink: development and difference in Germanic colour semantics
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 49, p. 19-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article traces the birth of two different pink categories in western Europe and the lexicalization strategies used for these categories in English, German, Bernese, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Icelandic with the cognate sets pink, rosa, bleikur, lyserod, ceris. In the 18th century, a particular shade of light red established itself in the cultural life of people in Western Europe, earning its own independent colour term. In the middle of the 20th century, a second pink category began to spread in a subset of the languages. Contemporary experimental data from the Evolution of Semantic Systems colour project (Majid et al., 2011) is analysed in light of the extant historical data on the development of these colour terms. We find that the current pink situation arose through contact-induced lexical and conceptual change. Despite the different lexicalization strategies, the terms' denotation is remarkably similar for the oldest pink category and we investigate the impact of the advent of the younger and more restricted secondary pink category on the colour categorization and colour denotations of the languages.

National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-117714 (URN)10.1016/j.langsci.2014.07.007 (DOI)000353848600002 ()
Available from: 2015-06-12 Created: 2015-06-01 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Vejdemo-Johansson, M., Vejdemo, S. & Ek, C.-H. (2014). Comparing Distributions of Color Words: Pitfalls and Metric Choices. PLOS ONE, 9(2), e89184
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparing Distributions of Color Words: Pitfalls and Metric Choices
2014 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 2, p. e89184-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Computational methods have started playing a significant role in semantic analysis. One particularly accessible area for developing good computational methods for linguistic semantics is in color naming, where perceptual dissimilarity measures provide a geometric setting for the analyses. This setting has been studied first by Berlin & Kay in 1969, and then later on by a large data collection effort: the World Color Survey (WCS). From the WCS, a dataset on color naming by 2 616 speakers of 110 different languages is made available for further research. In the analysis of color naming from WCS, however, the choice of analysis method is an important factor of the analysis. We demonstrate concrete problems with the choice of metrics made in recent analyses of WCS data, and offer approaches for dealing with the problems we can identify. Picking a metric for the space of color naming distributions that ignores perceptual distances between colors assumes a decorrelated system, where strong spatial correlations in fact exist. We can demonstrate that the corresponding issues are significantly improved when using Earth Mover's Distance, or Quadratic x-square Distance, and we can approximate these solutions with a kernel-based analysis method.

National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-102790 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0089184 (DOI)000332385900033 ()
Available from: 2014-04-23 Created: 2014-04-22 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Koptjevskaja-Tamm, M., Vejdemo, S. & Sahlgren, M. (2012). "Hot and cold — universal or language-specific"?. In: : . Paper presented at SLE 2012 - 45th Annual Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europaea, Stockholm, Sweden, August 29-September 1, 2012.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"Hot and cold — universal or language-specific"?
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-86139 (URN)
Conference
SLE 2012 - 45th Annual Meeting of the Societas Linguistica Europaea, Stockholm, Sweden, August 29-September 1, 2012
Available from: 2013-01-11 Created: 2013-01-11 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Vejdemo, S. (2010). Cross-linguistic Lexical Change: Why, How and How Fast?. In: Proceedings of WIGL 2010: . Paper presented at Workshop in General Linguistics (WIGL) 8, University of Wisconsin, Madison, April 24-25, 2010. University of Wisconsin, Madison
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-linguistic Lexical Change: Why, How and How Fast?
2010 (English)In: Proceedings of WIGL 2010, University of Wisconsin, Madison , 2010Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
University of Wisconsin, Madison, 2010
Series
LSO Working Papers in Linguistics ; 8
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-86415 (URN)
Conference
Workshop in General Linguistics (WIGL) 8, University of Wisconsin, Madison, April 24-25, 2010
Available from: 2013-01-13 Created: 2013-01-13 Last updated: 2022-03-15Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7206-1759

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