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Publications (10 of 51) Show all publications
Rajaleid, K. & Vågerö, D. (2023). Parental and family determinants of the Flynn effect. Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, 14(4), 469-491
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parental and family determinants of the Flynn effect
2023 (English)In: Longitudinal and Life Course Studies, E-ISSN 1757-9597, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 469-491Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Research about the Flynn effect, the secular rise in IQ, is heavily based on conscript data from successive male birth cohorts. This inevitably means that two distinct phenomena are mixed: fertility differences by IQ group ('compositional Flynn effect'), and any difference between parents and children ('within-family Flynn effect'). Both will influence trends in cognitive ability. We focused on the latter phenomenon, exploring changes in cognitive abilities during adolescence within one generation, and between two successive generations within the same family. We identified determinants and outcomes in three linked generations in the Stockholm Multigenerational Study. School and conscript data covered logical/numerical and verbal scores for mothers at age 13, fathers at 13 and 18, and their sons at 18. Raw scores, and change in raw scores, were used as outcomes in linear regressions. Both parents' abilities at 13 were equally important for sons' abilities at 18. Boys from disadvantaged backgrounds caught up with other boys during adolescence. Comparing fathers with sons, there appeared to be a positive Flynn effect in logical/numeric and verbal abilities. This was larger if the father had a working-class background or many siblings. A Flynn effect was only visible in families where the father had low general cognitive ability at 18. We conclude that there is a general improvement in logical/numeric and verbal skills from one generation to the next, primarily based on improvement in disadvantaged families. The Flynn effect in Sweden during the later 20th century appears to represent a narrowing between social categories.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol University Press, 2023
Keywords
Flynn effect, logical ability, verbal ability, intergenerational study, Sweden
National Category
Social Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-217277 (URN)10.1332/175795921X16708793393107 (DOI)000971977100001 ()37874205 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175742242 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-07 Created: 2023-06-07 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Leon, D. A., Jdanov, D., Gerry, C. J., Grigoriev, P., Jasilionis, D., McKee, M., . . . Vågerö, D. (2022). The Russian invasion of Ukraine and its public health consequences [Letter to the editor]. The Lancet Regional Health: Europe, 15, Article ID 100358.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Russian invasion of Ukraine and its public health consequences
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2022 (English)In: The Lancet Regional Health: Europe, E-ISSN 2666-7762, Vol. 15, article id 100358Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-208751 (URN)10.1016/j.lanepe.2022.100358 (DOI)000821675800019 ()2-s2.0-85127040552 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-06 Created: 2022-09-06 Last updated: 2022-09-06Bibliographically approved
B. Almquist, Y., Grotta, A., Vågerö, D., Stenberg, S.-Å. & Modin, B. (2020). Cohort Profile Update: The Stockholm Birth Cohort Study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 49(2), 367-367e
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cohort Profile Update: The Stockholm Birth Cohort Study
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 49, no 2, p. 367-367eArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology) Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Sociology; Public Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-173505 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyz185 (DOI)
Projects
Reproduction of inequality through linked lives (RELINK)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016–07148
Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Rajaleid, K. & Vågerö, D. (2019). Stress resilience in young men mediates the effect of childhood trauma on their offspring's birth weight – An analysis of 250,000 families. SSM - Population Health, 8, Article ID 100429.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stress resilience in young men mediates the effect of childhood trauma on their offspring's birth weight – An analysis of 250,000 families
2019 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 8, article id 100429Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experiencing the death of a parent during childhood is a severe trauma that seems to affect the next generation's birth weight. We studied the consequences of parental loss during childhood for men's psychological and physiological characteristics at age 18, and whether these were important for their first-born offspring's birth outcomes. We used a structured life-course approach and four-way decomposition analysis to analyse data for 250,427 three-generation families retrieved from nationwide Swedish registers and found that psychological resilience was impaired and body mass index was higher in men who had experienced parental death. Both characteristics were linked to offspring birth weight. This was lower by 18.0 g (95% confidence interval: 5.7, 30.3) for men who lost a parent at ages 8–17 compared to other ages. Resilience mediated 40% of this influence. Mediation by body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was negligible, as was the effect of parental loss on length of gestation. There was no mediation by the education of the men's future spouse.

Previous literature has indicated that the period before puberty, the “slow growth period”, is sensitive. Our evidence suggests that this may be too narrow a restriction: boys aged 8–17 appear to be particularly likely to respond to parental loss in a way which affects their future offspring's birth weight. We conclude that the observed transgenerational influence on birth weight is mediated by the father's psychological resilience but not by his body mass index or blood pressure.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Public Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-173552 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2019.100429 (DOI)000498896300044 ()31249858 (PubMedID)
Projects
Reproduction of inequality through linked lives (RELINK)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P14–0500:1Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016–07148
Available from: 2019-09-25 Created: 2019-09-25 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
de-Graft Aikins, A., Wikler, D., Allotey, P., Beisel, U., Cooper, M., Eyal, N., . . . Jebari, K. (2018). Global Health and the Changing Contours of Human Life. In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress: Volume 3: Transformations in Values, Norms, Cultures (pp. 713-752). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Health and the Changing Contours of Human Life
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2018 (English)In: Rethinking Society for the 21st Century: Report of the International Panel on Social Progress: Volume 3: Transformations in Values, Norms, Cultures, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018, p. 713-752Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The contours of human life – birth, childhood, maturity, reproduction, the experiences of health, illness, and disability, and death – have been and will remain nearly universal; but their duration and texture are undergoing great changes. In this chapter, we chart the transformations and make projections into the near future. Many of the trends are favorable: fewer children are dying, and many enjoy greater longevity. But these advances are not distributed uniformly among and within countries and regions. Furthermore, the value of longevity is compromised by an increasing number of people living with diminished health under inequitable systems of health and social care. A more just future can be achieved by a continuing emphasis on equity in global health systems even as human lives continue to be extended and enhanced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology
Research subject
Public Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-165198 (URN)10.1017/9781108399661.005 (DOI)9781108399661 (ISBN)
Note

After four years of drafting, debating, rethinking, and revising, the International Panel on Social Progress (IPSP) report is finally published. This work represents an incredible effort from our 200+ authors all around the world. The report is available from Cambridge University Press in multiple forms: as a 3-volume set, as separate volumes, and as a Kindle e-book.

Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Vågerö, D., Pinger, P. R., Aronsson, V. & van den Berg, G. J. (2018). Paternal grandfather's access to food predicts all-cause and cancer mortality in grandsons. Nature Communications, 9, Article ID 5124.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paternal grandfather's access to food predicts all-cause and cancer mortality in grandsons
2018 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 5124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Studies of animals and plants suggest that nutritional conditions in one generation may affect phenotypic characteristics in subsequent generations. A small number of human studies claim to show that pre-pubertal nutritional experience trigger a sex-specific transgenerational response along the male line. A single historical dataset, the Overkalix cohorts in northern Sweden, is often quoted as evidence. To test this hypothesis on an almost 40 times larger dataset we collect harvest data during the pre-pubertal period of grandparents (G0, n = 9,039) to examine its potential association with mortality in children (G1, n = 7,280) and grandchildren (G2, n = 11,561) in the Uppsala Multigeneration Study. We find support for the main Overkalix finding: paternal grandfather's food access in pre-puberty predicts his male, but not female, grandchildren's all-cause mortality. In our study, cancer mortality contributes strongly to this pattern. We are unable to reproduce previous results for diabetes and cardiovascular mortality.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-163689 (URN)10.1038/s41467-018-07617-9 (DOI)000452776500001 ()30538239 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-18 Created: 2019-01-18 Last updated: 2023-03-28Bibliographically approved
Vågerö, D., Aronsson, V. & Modin, B. (2018). Why is parental lifespan linked to children’s chances of reaching a high age? A transgenerational hypothesis. SSM - Population Health, 4, 45-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why is parental lifespan linked to children’s chances of reaching a high age? A transgenerational hypothesis
2018 (English)In: SSM - Population Health, ISSN 2352-8273, Vol. 4, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Transgenerational determinants of longevity are poorly understood. We used data from four linked generations (G0, G1, G2 and G3) of the Uppsala Birth Cohort Multigeneration Study to address this issue.

Methods

Mortality in G1 (N = 9565) was followed from 1961–2015 and analysed in relation to tertiles of their parents’ (G0) age-at-death using Cox regression. Parental social class and marital status were adjusted for in the analyses, as was G1’s birth order and adult social class. For an almost entirely deceased segment of G1 (n = 1149), born 1915–1917, we compared exact age-at-death with G0 parents’ age-at-death. Finally, we explored ‘resilience’ as a potentially important mechanism for intergenerational transmission of longevity, using conscript information from psychological interviews of G2 and G3 men.

Results

G0 men’s and women’s ages-at-death were independently associated with G1 midlife and old age mortality. This association was robust and minimally reduced when G0 and G1 social class were adjusted for. We observed an increased lifespan in all social groups. Median difference in age-at-death for sons compared to fathers was + 3.9 years, and + 6.9 years for daughters compared to mothers.

Parents’ and maternal grandmother’s longevity were associated with resilience in subsequent generations. Resilience scores of G2 men were also associated with those of their G3 sons and with their own mortality in midlife.

Conclusions

The chance of reaching a high age is transmitted from parents to children in a modest, but robust way. Longevity inheritance is paralleled by the inheritance of individual resilience. Individual resilience, we propose, develops in the first part of life as a response to adversity and early experience in general. This gives rise to a transgenerational pathway, distinct from social class trajectories. A theory of longevity inheritance should bring together previous thinking around general susceptibility, frailty and resilience with new insights from epigenetics and social epidemiology.

Keywords
Longevity, Lifespan, Resilience, Susceptibility, Transgenerational, Epigenetics
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-149366 (URN)10.1016/j.ssmph.2017.11.006 (DOI)000440723000006 ()
Projects
RELINK
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Vågerö, D. & Rajaleid, K. (2017). Does childhood trauma influence offspring’s birth characteristics?. International Journal of Epidemiology, 46(1), 219-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does childhood trauma influence offspring’s birth characteristics?
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A recent epigenetic hypothesis postulates that ‘a sex-specific male-line transgenerational effect exists in humans’, which can be triggered by childhood trauma during ‘the slow growth period’ just before puberty. The evidence is based on a few rather small epidemiological studies. We examine what response childhood trauma predicts, if any, in the birth size and prematurity risk of almost 800 000 offspring. Methods: Children of parity 1, 2 or 3, born 1976-2002 in Sweden, for whom we could trace both parents and all four grandparents, constituted generation 3 (G3, n ¼ 764 569). Around 5% of their parents, G2, suffered parental (G1) death during their own childhood. The association of such trauma in G2 with G3 prematurity and birthweight was analysed, while controlling for confounders in G1 and G2. We examined whether the slow growth period was extra sensitive to parental loss. Results: Parental (G1) death during (G2) childhood predicts premature birth and lower birthweight in the offspring generation (G3). This response is dependent on G2 gender, G2 age at exposure and G3 parity, but not G3 gender. Conclusions: The results are compatible with the Pembrey-Bygren hypothesis that trauma exposure during boys’ slow growth period may trigger a transgenerational response; age at trauma exposure among girls seems less important, suggesting a different set of pathways for any transgenerational response. Finally, parental death during childhood was not important for the reproduction of social inequalities in birthweight and premature birth.

Keywords
Childhood trauma, parental loss, transgenerational response, birthweight, prematurity, slow growth period, inequalities, Sweden
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-132633 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyw048 (DOI)000402724100031 ()P-3379 (Local ID)P-3379 (Archive number)P-3379 (OAI)
Available from: 2016-08-17 Created: 2016-08-17 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Vågerö, D. & Rajaleid, K. (2017). Transgenerational response and life history theory: a response to Peeter Hõrak. International Journal of Epidemiology, 46(1), 233-234
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transgenerational response and life history theory: a response to Peeter Hõrak
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0300-5771, E-ISSN 1464-3685, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 233-234Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-138421 (URN)10.1093/ije/dyw369 (DOI)000402724100033 ()
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-20 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Lundberg, O., Albin, M., Hartman, L., Nilsson, I., Sjögren, A., Wieselgren, I.-M., . . . Östergren, P.-O. (2016). Det handlar om jämlik hälsa: utgångspunkter för Kommissionens vidare arbete. Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det handlar om jämlik hälsa: utgångspunkter för Kommissionens vidare arbete
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2016 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Wolters Kluwer, 2016. p. 200
Series
Statens offentliga utredningar, ISSN 0375-250X ; 2016:55
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-137005 (URN)978-91-38-24484-5 (ISBN)
Note

Regeringen beslutade vid sammanträde den 4 juni 2015 att tillsätta en kommitté – en kommission för jämlik hälsa – med uppdrag att lämna förslag som kan bidra till att hälsoklyftorna minskar (Dir. 2015:60). Till grund för kommitténs uppdrag ligger regeringens mål om att de påverkbara hälsoklyftorna ska slutas inom en generation. Kommittén har antagit namnet Kommissionen för jämlik hälsa. Som ordförande i Kommissionen förordnades fr.o.m den 4 juni 2015 Olle Lundberg (professor i forskning om ojämlikhet i hälsa).

Available from: 2016-12-20 Created: 2016-12-20 Last updated: 2022-03-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1854-2292

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