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Hidvegi, Attila
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 109) Show all publications
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zhelnin, P. (2023). A Search for IceCube Sub-TeV Neutrinos Correlated with Gravitational-wave Events Detected By LIGO/Virgo. Astrophysical Journal, 959(2), Article ID 96.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Search for IceCube Sub-TeV Neutrinos Correlated with Gravitational-wave Events Detected By LIGO/Virgo
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2023 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 959, no 2, article id 96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The LIGO/Virgo collaboration published the catalogs GWTC-1, GWTC-2.1, and GWTC-3 containing candidate gravitational-wave (GW) events detected during its runs O1, O2, and O3. These GW events can be possible sites of neutrino emission. In this paper, we present a search for neutrino counterparts of 90 GW candidates using IceCube DeepCore, the low-energy infill array of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The search is conducted using an unbinned maximum likelihood method, within a time window of 1000 s, and uses the spatial and timing information from the GW events. The neutrinos used for the search have energies ranging from a few GeV to several tens of TeV. We do not find any significant emission of neutrinos, and place upper limits on the flux and the isotropic-equivalent energy emitted in low-energy neutrinos. We also conduct a binomial test to search for source populations potentially contributing to neutrino emission. We report a nondetection of a significant neutrino-source population with this test.

Keywords
Neutrino astronomy, Neutrino telescopes, Gravitational waves, Gravitational wave astronomy, Particle astrophysics
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225393 (URN)10.3847/1538-4357/aceefc (DOI)001121393200001 ()
Available from: 2024-01-18 Created: 2024-01-18 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zhelnin, P. (2023). Constraints on Populations of Neutrino Sources from Searches in the Directions of IceCube Neutrino Alerts. Astrophysical Journal, 951(1), Article ID 45.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constraints on Populations of Neutrino Sources from Searches in the Directions of IceCube Neutrino Alerts
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2023 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 951, no 1, article id 45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Beginning in 2016, the IceCube Neutrino Observatory has sent out alerts in real time containing the information of high-energy (E & GSIM; 100 TeV) neutrino candidate events with moderate to high (& GSIM;30%) probability of astrophysical origin. In this work, we use a recent catalog of such alert events, which, in addition to events announced in real time, includes events that were identified retroactively and covers the time period of 2011-2020. We also search for additional, lower-energy neutrinos from the arrival directions of these IceCube alerts. We show how performing such an analysis can constrain the contribution of rare populations of cosmic neutrino sources to the diffuse astrophysical neutrino flux. After searching for neutrino emission coincident with these alert events on various timescales, we find no significant evidence of either minute-scale or day-scale transient neutrino emission or of steady neutrino emission in the direction of these alert events. This study also shows how numerous a population of neutrino sources has to be to account for the complete astrophysical neutrino flux. Assuming that sources have the same luminosity, an E (-2.5) neutrino spectrum, and number densities that follow star formation rates, the population of sources has to be more numerous than 7 x 10(-9) Mpc(-3). This number changes to 3 x 10(-7) Mpc(-3) if number densities instead have no cosmic evolution.

National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-220839 (URN)10.3847/1538-4357/acd2ca (DOI)001023878800001 ()2-s2.0-85164611651 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2023-09-14Bibliographically approved
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zhelnin, P. (2023). IceCat-1: The IceCube Event Catalog of Alert Tracks. Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, 269(1), Article ID 25.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>IceCat-1: The IceCube Event Catalog of Alert Tracks
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2023 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, ISSN 0067-0049, E-ISSN 1538-4365, Vol. 269, no 1, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a catalog of likely astrophysical neutrino track-like events from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. IceCube began reporting likely astrophysical neutrinos in 2016, and this system was updated in 2019. The catalog presented here includes events that were reported in real time since 2019, as well as events identified in archival data samples starting from 2011. We report 275 neutrino events from two selection channels as the first entries in the catalog, the IceCube Event Catalog of Alert Tracks, which will see ongoing extensions with additional alerts. The Gold and Bronze alert channels respectively provide neutrino candidates with a 50% and 30% probability of being astrophysical, on average assuming an astrophysical neutrino power-law energy spectral index of 2.19. For each neutrino alert, we provide the reconstructed energy, direction, false-alarm rate, probability of being astrophysical in origin, and likelihood contours describing the spatial uncertainty in the alert's reconstructed location. We also investigate a directional correlation of these neutrino events with gamma-ray and X-ray catalogs, including 4FGL, 3HWC, TeVCat, and Swift-BAT.

Keywords
Neutrino astronomy, Astronomical methods, High energy astrophysics
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225392 (URN)10.3847/1538-4365/acfa95 (DOI)001102897500001 ()2-s2.0-85180438183 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-18 Created: 2024-01-18 Last updated: 2024-01-18Bibliographically approved
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zhelnin, P. (2023). Limits on Neutrino Emission from GRB 221009A from MeV to PeV Using the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. Astrophysical Journal Letters, 946(1), Article ID L26.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limits on Neutrino Emission from GRB 221009A from MeV to PeV Using the IceCube Neutrino Observatory
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2023 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal Letters, ISSN 2041-8205, E-ISSN 2041-8213, Vol. 946, no 1, article id L26Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have long been considered a possible source of high-energy neutrinos. While no correlations have yet been detected between high-energy neutrinos and GRBs, the recent observation of GRB 221009A-the brightest GRB observed by Fermi-GBM to date and the first one to be observed above an energy of 10 TeV-provides a unique opportunity to test for hadronic emission. In this paper, we leverage the wide energy range of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory to search for neutrinos from GRB 221009A. We find no significant deviation from background expectation across event samples ranging from MeV to PeV energies, placing stringent upper limits on the neutrino emission from this source.

National Category
Other Physics Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-218375 (URN)10.3847/2041-8213/acc077 (DOI)000982870400001 ()2-s2.0-85152131040 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2023-06-27Bibliographically approved
Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M. & Walck, C. (2023). Observation of seasonal variations of the flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos with IceCube. European Physical Journal C, 83(9), Article ID 777.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Observation of seasonal variations of the flux of high-energy atmospheric neutrinos with IceCube
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2023 (English)In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 83, no 9, article id 777Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Atmospheric muon neutrinos are produced by meson decays in cosmic-ray-induced air showers. The flux depends on meteorological quantities such as the air temperature, which affects the density of air. Competition between decay and re-interaction of those mesons in the first particle production generations gives rise to a higher neutrino flux when the air density in the stratosphere is lower, corresponding to a higher temperature. A measurement of a temperature dependence of the atmospheric ?mu, flux provides a novel method for constraining hadronic interaction models of air showers. It is particularly sensitive to the production of kaons. Studying this temperature dependence for the first time requires a large sample of high-energy neutrinos as well as a detailed understanding of atmospheric properties. We report the significant (> 10 s) observation of a correlation between the rate of more than 260,000 neutrinos, detected by IceCube between 2012 and 2018, and atmospheric tem-peratures of the stratosphere, measured by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's AQUA satellite. For the observed 10% seasonal change of effective atmospheric temperature we measure a 3.5(3)% change in the muon neutrino flux. This observed correlation deviates by about 2-3 standard deviations from the expected correla-tion of 4.3% as obtained from theoretical predictions under the assumption of various hadronic interaction models.

National Category
Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223858 (URN)10.1140/epjc/s10052-023-11679-5 (DOI)001063424400001 ()2-s2.0-85169691648 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-22 Created: 2023-11-22 Last updated: 2023-11-22Bibliographically approved
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zhelnin, P. (2023). Search for Correlations of High-energy Neutrinos Detected in IceCube with Radio-bright AGN and Gamma-Ray Emission from Blazars. Astrophysical Journal, 954(1), Article ID 75.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Search for Correlations of High-energy Neutrinos Detected in IceCube with Radio-bright AGN and Gamma-Ray Emission from Blazars
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2023 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 954, no 1, article id 75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory sends realtime neutrino alerts with a high probability of being astrophysical in origin. We present a new method to correlate these events and possible candidate sources using 2089 blazars from the Fermi-LAT 4LAC-DR2 catalog and with 3413 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) from the Radio Fundamental Catalog. No statistically significant neutrino emission was found in any of the catalog searches. The result suggests that a small fraction, <1%, of the studied AGNs emit neutrinos that pass the alert criteria, and is compatible with prior evidence for neutrino emission presented by IceCube and other authors from sources such as TXS 0506 + 056 and PKS 1502 + 106. We also present cross-checks to other analyses that claim a significant correlation using similar data samples.

National Category
Subatomic Physics Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223018 (URN)10.3847/1538-4357/acdfcb (DOI)001058032100001 ()2-s2.0-85172790325 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-23 Created: 2023-10-23 Last updated: 2023-10-23Bibliographically approved
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zimmerman, M. (2023). Search for Extended Sources of Neutrino Emission in the Galactic Plane with IceCube. Astrophysical Journal, 956(1), Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Search for Extended Sources of Neutrino Emission in the Galactic Plane with IceCube
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2023 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 956, no 1, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Galactic plane, harboring a diffuse neutrino flux, is a particularly interesting target in which to study potential cosmic-ray acceleration sites. Recent gamma-ray observations by HAWC and LHAASO have presented evidence for multiple Galactic sources that exhibit a spatially extended morphology and have energy spectra continuing beyond 100 TeV. A fraction of such emission could be produced by interactions of accelerated hadronic cosmic rays, resulting in an excess of high-energy neutrinos clustered near these regions. Using 10 years of IceCube data comprising track-like events that originate from charged-current muon neutrino interactions, we perform a dedicated search for extended neutrino sources in the Galaxy. We find no evidence for time-integrated neutrino emission from the potential extended sources studied in the Galactic plane. The most significant location, at 2.6σ post-trials, is a sized region coincident with the unidentified TeV gamma-ray source 3HWC J1951+266. We provide strong constraints on hadronic emission from several regions in the galaxy.

Keywords
Neutrino astronomy
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224209 (URN)10.3847/1538-4357/acf713 (DOI)001084391400001 ()2-s2.0-85175099778 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2023-12-05Bibliographically approved
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zhelnin, P. (2023). Search for neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation and decay with IceCube. Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, 108(10), Article ID 102004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Search for neutrino lines from dark matter annihilation and decay with IceCube
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2023 (English)In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 108, no 10, article id 102004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dark matter particles in the Galactic Center and halo can annihilate or decay into a pair of neutrinos producing a monochromatic flux of neutrinos. The spectral feature of this signal is unique and it is not expected from any astrophysical production mechanism. Its observation would constitute a dark matter smoking gun signal. We performed the first dedicated search with a neutrino telescope for such signal, by looking at both the angular and energy information of the neutrino events. To this end, a total of five years of IceCube’s DeepCore data has been used to test dark matter masses ranging from 10 GeV to 40 TeV. No significant neutrino excess was found and upper limits on the annihilation cross section, as well as lower limits on the dark matter lifetime, were set. The limits reached are of the order of 10−24  cm3/s for an annihilation and up to 1027  s for decaying dark matter. Using the same data sample we also derive limits for dark matter annihilation or decay into a pair of Standard Model charged particles.

 

National Category
Physical Sciences Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-226490 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevD.108.102004 (DOI)001140324400001 ()2-s2.0-85180234159 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-14 Created: 2024-02-14 Last updated: 2024-02-14Bibliographically approved
Abbasi, R., Deoskar, K., Finley, C., Hidvegi, A., Hultqvist, K., Jansson, M., . . . Zhelnin, P. (2023). Search for sub-TeV Neutrino Emission from Novae with IceCube-DeepCore. Astrophysical Journal, 953(2), Article ID 160.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Search for sub-TeV Neutrino Emission from Novae with IceCube-DeepCore
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2023 (English)In: Astrophysical Journal, ISSN 0004-637X, E-ISSN 1538-4357, Vol. 953, no 2, article id 160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The understanding of novae, the thermonuclear eruptions on the surfaces of white dwarf stars in binaries, has recently undergone a major paradigm shift. Though the bolometric luminosity of novae was long thought to arise directly from photons supplied by the thermonuclear runaway, recent gigaelectronvolt (GeV) gamma-ray observations have supported the notion that a significant portion of the luminosity could come from radiative shocks. More recently, observations of novae have lent evidence that these shocks are acceleration sites for hadrons for at least some types of novae. In this scenario, a flux of neutrinos may accompany the observed gamma rays. As the gamma rays from most novae have only been observed up to a few GeV, novae have previously not been considered as targets for neutrino telescopes, which are most sensitive at and above teraelectronvolt (TeV) energies. Here, we present the first search for neutrinos from novae with energies between a few GeV and 10 TeV using IceCube-DeepCore, a densely instrumented region of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory with a reduced energy threshold. We search both for a correlation between gamma-ray and neutrino emission as well as between optical and neutrino emission from novae. We find no evidence for neutrino emission from the novae considered in this analysis and set upper limits for all gamma-ray detected novae.

Keywords
Novae, High energy astrophysics, Neutrino astronomy, Neutrino telescopes
National Category
Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223278 (URN)10.3847/1538-4357/acdc1b (DOI)001053469100001 ()2-s2.0-85172024545 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-25 Created: 2023-10-25 Last updated: 2023-10-25Bibliographically approved
Bohm, C., Danared, H., Hedqvist, A., Hellberg, F., Hidvégi, A., Larsson, M. & Robson, C. (2020). A MHz-repetition-rate hard X-ray free-electron laser driven by a superconducting linear accelerator. Nature Photonics, 14(6), 391-397
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A MHz-repetition-rate hard X-ray free-electron laser driven by a superconducting linear accelerator
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2020 (English)In: Nature Photonics, ISSN 1749-4885, E-ISSN 1749-4893, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 391-397Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The European XFEL is a hard X-ray free-electron laser (FEL) based on a high-electron-energy superconducting linear accelerator. The superconducting technology allows for the acceleration of many electron bunches within one radio-frequency pulse of the accelerating voltage and, in turn, for the generation of a large number of hard X-ray pulses. We report on the performance of the European XFEL accelerator with up to 5,000 electron bunches per second and demonstrating a full energy of 17.5 GeV. Feedback mechanisms enable stabilization of the electron beam delivery at the FEL undulator in space and time. The measured FEL gain curve at 9.3 keV is in good agreement with predictions for saturated FEL radiation. Hard X-ray lasing was achieved between 7 keV and 14 keV with pulse energies of up to 2.0 mJ. Using the high repetition rate, an FEL beam with 6 W average power was created. The first operation of the European X-ray free-electron laser facility accelerator based on superconducting technology is reported. The maximum electron energy is 17.5 GeV. A laser average power of 6 W is achieved at a photon energy of 9.3 keV.

National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-182975 (URN)10.1038/s41566-020-0607-z (DOI)000534781300003 ()2-s2.0-85085162600 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-07-06 Created: 2020-07-06 Last updated: 2022-11-07Bibliographically approved
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