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Rindstedt, Camilla
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Aronsson, K. & Rindstedt, C. (2023). Praise and self-praise: Young children's drawings as triadic performance in health care. Journal of Pragmatics, 218, 83-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Praise and self-praise: Young children's drawings as triadic performance in health care
2023 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 218, p. 83-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Praise appears in both direct and indirect formats. Much work on praise in social interaction concerns adults. This video ethnography fills a gap in exploring how young children orient to praise, analyzing the nature of praise during nurse-child interaction in routine health care encounters. It documents multimodal aspects of praise and self-praise episodes during Draw-a-Man tasks, as parts of routine checkups of 4-year-olds. The analyses are based on detailed transcripts of nurse-child collaboration and of praise episodes, focusing on how nurses praise children and the ways in which individual children (or parents) are involved in direct or indirect self-praise during the interactions. In social interaction among adults, there tends to be an avoidance of self-praise. This study reveals somewhat different patterns among children. Response cries, glee gestures and what we call glee displays were parts of the children's self-praise repertoires. Moreover, children at times acknowledged praise through confirmatory nodding or smiles, what is here seen as children's indirect self-praise. In this assessment context, praise and indirect assessments were part of both nurse-child and parent-child interaction. A major finding is that in many cases, the child's drawing performance was a triadic accomplishment, scaffolded by both the nurse and the accompanying parent.

Keywords
Praise, Self-praise, Indirect praise, Glee displays, Performance, Collaboration
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224649 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2023.09.017 (DOI)001102952100001 ()2-s2.0-85174463823 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. (2016). Negotiating illness in medical interactions: Narrative styles of two children with leukaemia. Children & society, 30(4), 278-289
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating illness in medical interactions: Narrative styles of two children with leukaemia
2016 (English)In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 278-289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The illness narratives presented in this paper were video-recorded as part of child patient–staff interaction, during more than a year of ethnographic fieldwork at a paediatric oncology centre. The two children tended to ‘do illness’ differently, producing different types of narrative accounts. One of them presented accounts that invoked ‘fight’ metaphors, whereas the other one invoked patient identities. Also, the medical staff deployed different interactional strategies with different children in response to their narrative constructions of themselves and their leukaemia.

Keywords
identity, illness narratie, negotiating interaction, video ethnography
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Child and Youth Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-130754 (URN)10.1111/chso.12138 (DOI)000382561300003 ()
Available from: 2016-06-03 Created: 2016-06-03 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. (2014). Children's strategies to handle cancer: a video ethnography of imaginal coping. Child Care Health and Development, 40(4), 580-586
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's strategies to handle cancer: a video ethnography of imaginal coping
2014 (English)In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 580-586Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This article explores how children use fantasy, play, and coping (imaginal coping) in order to handle chronic illness. Imaginal coping, as a theoretical construct, is defined as the use of imagination to deal with the hardships of illness. The overarching aim has been to investigate the various ways in which categories of staff members (doctors, nurses, play therapists, and hospital clowns) and parents support children in their coping. Focus has thus been on collaborative or interactive aspects of playful coping.

Method: A large proportion of the data collected consists of 93 h of video-recorded interactions between children, parents and staff. The collection of data involved fieldwork carried out with the use of a video ethnographic method, making it possible thereby to analyse and work with data in greater detail. For more than one year, five children with leukaemia were followed as each made their regular visits to a children's cancer clinic in a children's hospital in Sweden.

Results: Collaborative storytelling, humorous treatment practices, playful rituals, as well as role-reversal play, were all types of events involving staff–child collaboration and creative improvisation.

Conclusions: Staff, along with parents, played a significant role in the coping process. In various ways, the staff members helped the parents to respond to their children in ways adaptive for coping. It can be seen that imaginal coping is a highly interactional business. In this study it is shown that parents socialize coping; this is sometimes undertaken explicitly, for example, through coaching (in the form of instructions or suggestions) and teaching. But often it is achieved through modelling or intent participation, with the child observing staff members' treatment practices.

Keywords
coping, imaginal coping, interaction, paediatric cancer, parent and staff coping assistance, video ethnography
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Child and Youth Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101712 (URN)10.1111/cch.12064 (DOI)000337547500015 ()
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. (2014). Conversational openings and multiparty disambiguations in doctors' encounters with young patients (and their parents). Text & Talk, 34(4), 421-442
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conversational openings and multiparty disambiguations in doctors' encounters with young patients (and their parents)
2014 (English)In: Text & Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, E-ISSN 1860-7349, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 421-442Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Drawing on a video ethnography at a pediatric unit at a Swedish children's hospital, this study presents analyses of How are you (HAY) routines and problem elicitations. Such conversational openings are ambiguous in that they can either be read as casual greetings, or as genuine questions about the patient's health. Moreover, there is a double ambiguity in that the doctor, at times, employs third person pronouns (e. g., How is Elinor?) or second person plurals (e. g., So how are you doing?) which means that there is a second type of ambiguity, an ambiguity around who is addressed: the child and/or the parent(s). This study also shows that there is a great variation in conversational openings according to the age of the child in that the odds that the doctor might invite the child as a conversational partner increase with the child's age. The preschool children almost never respond to the doctor's HAY, and it does not matter if it is an ambiguous or unambiguous question. If they answer, it is in the form of a minimal uptake or after a whole series of questions. In contrast, the schoolchildren always respond to the doctors' HAY and offer quite elaborate and detailed responses.

Keywords
doctor-patient interactions, greeting routines, problem presentations, pediatrics, children's perspectives, video ethnography
National Category
Communication Studies Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-108220 (URN)10.1515/text-2014-0010 (DOI)000341560500003 ()
Note

AuthorCount:1;

Available from: 2014-10-15 Created: 2014-10-15 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. (2013). Barn möter vården. Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Barn möter vården
2013 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Denna bok handlar om barn i vården. Den presenterar forskning om barns röster i vårdsammanhang och om barns plats i möten i vården. Olika sätt att diskutera barnperspektiv presenteras utifrån tidigare forskning.

Barn möter vården bygger på ett videoetnografiskt fältarbete utfört på ett barnonkologiskt centrum på ett svenskt barnsjukhus, och som en röd tråd genom hela studien löper frågan om barns plats i samspel med läkare, sjuksköterskor och föräldrar. De empiriska data som boken bygger på visar att barn inte framträder som bifigurer i vårdarbetet, utan i hög grad som aktörer eller aktiva deltagare.

Barn möter vården är avsedd för lärar- och vårdutbildningar, men den vänder sig också till en bredare grupp läsare som intresserar sig för barns röster och barns perspektiv i vårdsammanhang. Boken bör också vara av intresse för kommunikationsforskare,  socialantropologer och andra samhällsvetare som är intresserade av barns villkor på ett mer generellt plan.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2013. p. 152
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Child and Youth Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101709 (URN)978-91-44-07686-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Johnson Frankenberg, S., Rindstedt, C., Rubenson, B. & Holmqvist, R. (2013). Being and becoming a responsible caregiver: Negotiating guidance and control in family interaction in Tanzania. Childhood, 20(4), 487-506
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being and becoming a responsible caregiver: Negotiating guidance and control in family interaction in Tanzania
2013 (English)In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 487-506Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores how siblings in Tanzania actively engage in their own socialization through the negotiation and local design of caregiving practices and control between younger siblings (age 1-3), older siblings (age 3-13) and adults. Analyses of moment-to-moment embodied, multimodal sequences of interaction illustrate how caregiving responsibility is negotiated. The analysis is multidisciplinary drawing on concepts developed in the traditions of sociology, language socialization and applied linguistics. The findings highlight the usefulness of a concept of socialization which recognizes the agency of the child and are discussed in relation to constructions of the caregiving child as both being and becoming.

Keywords
Becoming, being, caregiving practices, sibling interaction, Tanzania, video
National Category
Sociology Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-97389 (URN)10.1177/0907568212471405 (DOI)000326651600007 ()
Note

AuthorCount:4;

Available from: 2013-12-11 Created: 2013-12-09 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. & Aronsson, K. (2013). Children's intent participation in a pediatric community of practice. In: : . Paper presented at 112th Annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, November 20-24, 2013, Chicago.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's intent participation in a pediatric community of practice
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101722 (URN)
Conference
112th Annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, November 20-24, 2013, Chicago
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. (2013). Pain and nurses' emotion work in a paediatric clinic: Treatment procedures and nurse-child alignments. Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, 10(1), 51-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pain and nurses' emotion work in a paediatric clinic: Treatment procedures and nurse-child alignments
2013 (English)In: Communication & Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Healthcare, Ethics and Society, ISSN 1612-1783, E-ISSN 1613-3625, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 51-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the treatment of cancer in children, treatment procedures have been reported to be one of the most feared elements, as more painful than the illness as such. This study draws on a video ethnography of routine needle procedure events, as part of fieldwork at a paediatric oncology clinic documenting everyday treatment negotiations between nurses and young children. On the basis of detailed transcriptions of verbal and nonverbal staff–child interaction, the analyses focus on ways in which pain and anxiety can be seen as phenomena that are partly contingent on nurses’ emotion work. The school-age children did not display fear. In the preschool group, though, pain and fear seemed to be phenomena that were greatly reduced through nurses’ emotion work. This study focuses on three preschoolers facing potentially painful treatment, showing how the nurses engaged in massive emotion work with the children, through online commentaries, interactive formats (delegation of tasks, consent sequences, collaborative‘we’-formats), as well as solidarity-oriented moves (such as praise and endearment terms). Even a young toddler would handle the distress of needle procedures, when interacting with an inventive nurse who mobilized child participation through skilful emotion work.

Keywords
emotion work, intent participation, nurse-patient interaction, paediatrics, video ethnography
National Category
Other Social Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Child and Youth Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101710 (URN)10.1558/cam.v10i1.51 (DOI)
Available from: 2014-03-14 Created: 2014-03-14 Last updated: 2023-08-25Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. & Aronsson, K. (2012). Children's intent participation in a pediatric community of practice. Mind, culture and activity, 19(4), 325-341
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's intent participation in a pediatric community of practice
2012 (English)In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 325-341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study analyzes informal learning, drawing on video recordings of staff-child interaction in a pediatric unit. It is shown that even very young patients engage in intent community participation, carefully noting fine variations in examination and treatment practices. They orient to everyday routines in successively more complex ways, gradually acquiring novel repertoires of practices; advancing from nonverbal uptake to an active use of medical terminology, and to actively assisting staff members. Ultimately, the children themselves assume almost full responsibility for routine procedures. The unit had adopted partnership-oriented routines, and the doctors and nurses spent much time in securing the children's consent and participation in their own treatment. In contrast to much earlier work in pediatric settings which has shown children to be marginal participants; even the youngest patients were engaged, and they successively acquired a set of novel practices related to treatment procedures. Together with doctors and nurses, the children could be seen to form a community of practice. But community is not something fixed; instead it is seen as an emergent phenomenon, dependent on staff members' and children's mutual alignments and collaborative action. Learning is thus analyzed as a social and relational phenomenon.

National Category
Pedagogy Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-71060 (URN)10.1080/10749039.2012.663449 (DOI)000309266900001 ()
Available from: 2012-01-25 Created: 2012-01-25 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Rindstedt, C. (2012). 'Illness stories': berättelser av en tonårsflicka vid ett barnonkologiskt centrum. Locus (4), 43-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Illness stories': berättelser av en tonårsflicka vid ett barnonkologiskt centrum
2012 (Swedish)In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 4, p. 43-58Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Centrum för barn- och ungdomsvetenskap, 2012
National Category
Social Sciences Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-101782 (URN)
Available from: 2014-03-17 Created: 2014-03-17 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
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