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Olsson, P. & Moore, M.-L. (2024). A resilience-based transformations approach to peacebuilding and transformative justice. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 66, Article ID 101392.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A resilience-based transformations approach to peacebuilding and transformative justice
2024 (English)In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 66, article id 101392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Moving from a state of war or violent conflict will require a transformation, but there are no guarantees that transformations automatically lead to peace, sustainability, and justice. This review focuses on the temporary phase when a system is in limbo between the existing, dominant state and a new alternative state. We combine insights from a resilience approach to transformations with peacebuilding and transformative justice studies to focus on three roles that hybrid approaches to transformative and transitional justice may play in this phase, including 1) addressing ‘backlash’ dynamics, 2) strengthening the capacities needed to navigate cross-scale dynamics of conflict, and 3) responding to additional shocks, crises, and disturbances beyond the primary conflicts. Together, these findings advance the theoretical foundations for understanding peacebuilding as a transformative change process.

Keywords
Green & Sustainable Science & Technology
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-226069 (URN)10.1016/j.cosust.2023.101392 (DOI)001135468100001 ()2-s2.0-85179490453 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-12 Created: 2024-02-12 Last updated: 2024-02-12Bibliographically approved
Moore, M.-L., Hermanus, L., Drimie, S., Rose, L., Mbaligontsi, M., Musarurwa, H., . . . Olsson, P. (2023). Disrupting the opportunity narrative: navigating transformation in times of uncertainty and crisis. Sustainability Science, 18(4), 1649-1665
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disrupting the opportunity narrative: navigating transformation in times of uncertainty and crisis
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2023 (English)In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 1649-1665Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

COVID-19 posed threats for health and well-being directly, but it also revealed and exacerbated social–ecological inequalities, worsening hunger and poverty for millions. For those focused on transforming complex and problematic system dynamics, the question was whether such devastation could create a formative moment in which transformative change could become possible. Our study examines the experiences of change agents in six African countries engaged in efforts to create or support transformative change processes. To better understand the relationship between crisis, agency, and transformation, we explored how they navigated their changed conditions and the responses to COVID-19. We document three impacts: economic impacts, hunger, and gender-based violence and we examine how they (re)shaped the opportunity contexts for change. Finally, we identify four kinds of uncertainties that emerged as a result of policy responses, including uncertainty about the: (1) robustness of preparing a system to sustain a transformative trajectory, (2) sequencing and scaling of changes within and across systems, (3) hesitancy and exhaustion effects, and (4) long-term effects of surveillance, and we describe the associated change agent strategies. We suggest these uncertainties represent new theoretical ground for future transformations research.

Keywords
Sustainability transformations, Opportunity context, Crisis, Transformative agency, Uncertainty, COVID-19
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-229533 (URN)10.1007/s11625-023-01340-1 (DOI)001005862200001 ()37363311 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85161841292 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-24 Created: 2024-05-24 Last updated: 2024-05-24Bibliographically approved
Søgaard Jørgensen, P., Jansen, R. E. V., Avila Ortega, D. I., Wang-Erlandsson, L., Donges, J., Österblom, H., . . . Crépin, A.-S. (2023). Evolution of the polycrisis: Anthropocene traps that challenge global sustainability. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 379(1893), Article ID 20220261.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evolution of the polycrisis: Anthropocene traps that challenge global sustainability
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2023 (English)In: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8436, E-ISSN 1471-2970, Vol. 379, no 1893, article id 20220261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Anthropocene is characterized by accelerating change and global challenges of increasing complexity. Inspired by what some have called a polycrisis, we explore whether the human trajectory of increasing complexity and influence on the Earth system could become a form of trap for humanity. Based on an adaptation of the evolutionary traps concept to a global human context, we present results from a participatory mapping. We identify 14 traps and categorize them as either global, technology or structural traps. An assessment reveals that 12 traps (86%) could be in an advanced phase of trapping with high risk of hard-to-reverse lock-ins and growing risks of negative impacts on human well-being. Ten traps (71%) currently see growing trends in their indicators. Revealing the systemic nature of the polycrisis, we assess that Anthropocene traps often interact reinforcingly (45% of pairwise interactions), and rarely in a dampening fashion (3%). We end by discussing capacities that will be important for navigating these systemic challenges in pursuit of global sustainability. Doing so, we introduce evolvability as a unifying concept for such research between the sustainability and evolutionary sciences.

Keywords
cultural evolution, social–ecological systems, participatory mapping, complex adaptive systems, evolutionary traps
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-225226 (URN)10.1098/rstb.2022.0261 (DOI)37952617 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176728902 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2024-01-11 Created: 2024-01-11 Last updated: 2024-01-12Bibliographically approved
Tuckey, A. J., Harmáčková, Z. V., Peterson, G. D., Norström, A. V., Moore, M.-L., Olsson, P., . . . Jiménez Aceituno, A. (2023). What factors enable social-ecological transformative potential? The role of learning practices, empowerment, and networking. Ecology and Society, 28(2), Article ID 27.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What factors enable social-ecological transformative potential? The role of learning practices, empowerment, and networking
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2023 (English)In: Ecology and Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 28, no 2, article id 27Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Achieving sustainability in the Anthropocene requires radical changes to how human societies operate. The Seeds of Good Anthropocenes (SOGA) project has identified a diverse set of existing initiatives, called “seeds,” that have the potential to catalyze transformations toward more sustainable pathways. However, the empirical investigation of factors and conditions that enable successful sustainability transformations across multiple cases has been scarce. Building on a review of existing theoretical and empirical research, we developed a theoretical framework for assessing three features identified as important to transformative potential of innovative social-ecological initiatives: (1) learning practices, (2) empowerment, and (3) networking. We applied this framework to a set of African-led and Africa-related initiatives that we selected from the SOGA database that were divided into initiatives with more or less transformative potential. We coded the presence or absence of features relating to the theoretical framework using secondary data, and then compared the initiatives using qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). This analysis revealed that of the three features tested, Networking emerged as the most important feature for transformative potential when compared amongst cases. By developing and testing a framework for the comparison of cases we provide a basis for future comparative work to further identify and test properties of cases that enable transformation.

Keywords
local initiatives, qualitative comparative analysis (QCA), The Seeds of Good Anthropocenes, transformative potential
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224295 (URN)10.5751/ES-14163-280227 (DOI)001102824700001 ()
Available from: 2023-12-07 Created: 2023-12-07 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Lam, D. P. M., Jiménez Aceituno, A., Lara, L. G., Sellberg, M. M., Norström, A. V., Moore, M.-L., . . . Olsson, P. (2022). Amplifying actions for food system transformation: insights from the Stockholm region. Sustainability Science, 17(6), 2379-2395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amplifying actions for food system transformation: insights from the Stockholm region
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2022 (English)In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 2379-2395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Food is essential to people and is one of the main ways in which people are connected to the world’s ecosystems. However, food systems often cause ecosystem degradation and produce ill-health, which has generated increasing calls to transform food systems to be more sustainable. The Swedish food system is currently undergoing substantial change. A varied set of local actors have created alternative sustainability initiatives that enact new ways of doing, thinking, and organizing. These actors can increase the transformative impact of their initiatives through multiple actions and a variety of amplification processes. We analyzed the actions adopted by 29 food initiatives active in the Stockholm region using information available online. We conducted 11 interviews to better understand the amplification processes of speeding up (i.e., accelerating impact), scaling up (i.e., influencing higher institutional levels), and scaling deep (i.e., changing values and mind-sets). Our results indicated that the initiatives mainly seek to stabilize and grow their impact while changing the awareness, values, and mind-sets of people concerning the food they consume (scaling deep). However, these approaches raise new questions about whether these actions subvert or reinforce current unsustainable and inequitable system dynamics. We suggest there are distinct steps that local and regional governments could take to support these local actors via collaborations with coordinated forms of initiatives, and fostering changes at the municipality level, but these steps require ongoing, adaptive approaches given the highly complex nature of transformative change and the risks of reinforcing current system dynamics. 

Keywords
Food systems, Sustainability transformations, Amplification, Scaling, Socia-Ecological systems, Innovations
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Other Social Sciences Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-206880 (URN)10.1007/s11625-022-01154-7 (DOI)000810804400001 ()2-s2.0-85131797082 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-06-30 Created: 2022-06-30 Last updated: 2022-12-30Bibliographically approved
Sellberg, M. M., Norrby, J., Nowak, A., Rönnquist, L., Olsson, P., Peterson, G. & Alvsilver, A. (2022). Rapid Transition Lab: Navigating transformations in times of crises towards healthy, sustainable and just Swedish and planetary food systems. Stockholm: Stockholm University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rapid Transition Lab: Navigating transformations in times of crises towards healthy, sustainable and just Swedish and planetary food systems
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2022 (English)Report (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The centrality of food to human flourishing combined with how food is currently a source of many social and environmental problems means that many of the broader sustainability challenges can be addressed by fundamental changes to the production, distribution, and consumption of food. Such changes are central to what has been referred to as food system transformations. Transformations require significant changes in multiple dimensions of society. History shows us that crises can create openings for transformation. This project aims to learn from the Covid-19 crisis and support the enabling of capacities for transforming Swedish food systems to promote health, equity, sustainability and resilience of people and the planet. We did this through a Rapid Transition Lab. The lab identified risks and opportunities emerging in the Swedish food systems due to the Covid-19 pandemic through a co-creative process with public, private and civil food system actors. Since the war in Ukraine started, the initial focus on the pandemic expanded during the project to encompass multiple crises. The lab has developed understanding and articulated strategic options for Swedish food system actors to engage in a rapid transition, while navigating multiple crises.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University, 2022. p. 18
Keywords
Food systems, Transformations, Covid-19, Crises, Sustainability, Transdisciplinary research
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-210602 (URN)10.17045/sthlmuni.21275946.v1 (DOI)
Funder
Vinnova, 2021-01205
Available from: 2022-10-24 Created: 2022-10-24 Last updated: 2023-02-03Bibliographically approved
Søgaard Jørgensen, P., Avila Ortega, D. I., Blasiak, R., Cornell, S. E., Gordon, L. J., Nyström, M. & Olsson, P. (2022). The lure of novel biological and chemical entities in food-system transformations. One Earth, 5(10), 1085-1088
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The lure of novel biological and chemical entities in food-system transformations
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2022 (English)In: One Earth, ISSN 2590-3330, E-ISSN 2590-3322, Vol. 5, no 10, p. 1085-1088Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Synthetic chemicals and biologically engineered materials are major forces in today's food systems, but they are also major drivers of the global environmental changes and health challenges that characterize the Anthropocene. To address these challenges, we will need to increase assessment activity, promote alternative production practices with less reliance on such technologies, and regulate social campaigns and experiments. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cell Press, 2022
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-211904 (URN)10.1016/j.oneear.2022.09.011 (DOI)2-s2.0-85140251126 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-06 Created: 2022-12-06 Last updated: 2022-12-06Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, H., Blythe, J. L., Österblom, H. & Olsson, P. (2021). Beyond social-ecological traps: fostering transformations towards sustainability. Ecology and Society, 26(1), Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond social-ecological traps: fostering transformations towards sustainability
2021 (English)In: Ecology and Society, E-ISSN 1708-3087, Vol. 26, no 1, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This Special Feature is motivated by the rigorous, and growing, theoretical and empirical body of literature on social-ecological traps. Building on the foundational literature, which describes the context in many of the places where we work, we now look forward and ask how we can better understand and enable the breaking and escaping of social-ecological traps. In this Special Feature we focus on this frontier in the field and use the trap metaphor as a unifying framework for collating empirically derived insights on overcoming challenges across diverse geographies, sectors, and social-ecological contexts. We requested contributions to this feature that, as well as possible under each context, explore tangible pathways for disrupting social-ecological traps. Thematic relevance and clear contribution to social-ecological scholarship was emphasized in the invited contributions, but authors were not constrained by methodological approach, context, geographical location, or sector. Our ambition with this editorial is to synthesize the novel insights these papers highlight and situate their contributions within the relevant literature.

Keywords
comanagement, gender, livelihoods
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-194540 (URN)10.5751/ES-12198-260113 (DOI)000638266300022 ()
Available from: 2021-08-03 Created: 2021-08-03 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Raudsepp-Hearne, C., Peterson, G. D., Bennett, E. M., Biggs, R., Norström, A. V., Pereira, L., . . . Jiménez Aceituno, A. (2020). Seeds of good anthropocenes: developing sustainability scenarios for Northern Europe. Sustainability Science, 15(2), 605-617
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seeds of good anthropocenes: developing sustainability scenarios for Northern Europe
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2020 (English)In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 605-617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scenario development helps people think about a broad variety of possible futures; however, the global environmental change community has thus far developed few positive scenarios for the future of the planet and humanity. Those that have been developed tend to focus on the role of a few common, large-scale external drivers, such as technology or environmental policy, even though pathways of positive change are often driven by surprising or bottom-up initiatives that most scenarios assume are unchanging. We describe an approach, pioneered in Southern Africa and tested here in a new context in Northern Europe, to developing scenarios using existing bottom-up transformative initiatives to examine plausible transitions towards positive, sustainable futures. By starting from existing, but marginal initiatives, as well as current trends, we were able to identify system characteristics that may play a key role in sustainability transitions (e.g., gender issues, inequity, governance, behavioral change) that are currently under-explored in global environmental scenarios. We suggest that this approach could be applied in other places to experiment further with the methodology and its potential applications, and to explore what transitions to desirables futures might be like in different places.

Keywords
Scenarios, Transformation, Sustainability, Anthropocene, Futures, Green & Sustainable Science & Technology
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-180627 (URN)10.1007/s11625-019-00714-8 (DOI)000518796900017 ()
Available from: 2020-04-19 Created: 2020-04-19 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Ely, A., Marin, A., Charli-Joseph, L., Abrol, D., Apgar, M., Atela, J., . . . Yang, L. (2020). Structured Collaboration Across a Transformative Knowledge Network-Learning Across Disciplines, Cultures and Contexts?. Sustainability, 12(6), Article ID 2499.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Structured Collaboration Across a Transformative Knowledge Network-Learning Across Disciplines, Cultures and Contexts?
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2020 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 12, no 6, article id 2499Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Realising the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will require transformative changes at micro, meso and macro levels and across diverse geographies. Collaborative, transdisciplinary research has a role to play in documenting, understanding and contributing to such transformations. Previous work has investigated the role of this research in Europe and North America, however the dynamics of transdisciplinary research on 'transformations to sustainability' in other parts of the world are less well-understood. This paper reports on an international project that involved transdisciplinary research in six different hubs across the globe and was strategically designed to enable mutual learning and exchange. It draws on surveys, reports and research outputs to analyse the processes of transdisciplinary collaboration for sustainability that took place between 2015-2019. The paper illustrates how the project was structured in order to enable learning across disciplines, cultures and contexts and describes how it also provided for the negotiation of epistemological frameworks and different normative commitments between members across the network. To this end, it discusses lessons regarding the use of theoretical and methodological anchors, multi-loop learning and evaluating emergent change (including the difficulties encountered). It offers insights for the design and implementation of future international transdisciplinary collaborations that address locally-specific sustainability challenges within the universal framework of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Keywords
pathways, transdisciplinary research, international collaboration, sustainable development goals, theory of change, transformation, sustainable development goals
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-181196 (URN)10.3390/su12062499 (DOI)000523751400346 ()
Available from: 2020-04-29 Created: 2020-04-29 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9038-4786

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