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Publications (10 of 97) Show all publications
Aronsson, K. & Rindstedt, C. (2023). Praise and self-praise: Young children's drawings as triadic performance in health care. Journal of Pragmatics, 218, 83-98
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Praise and self-praise: Young children's drawings as triadic performance in health care
2023 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 218, p. 83-98Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Praise appears in both direct and indirect formats. Much work on praise in social interaction concerns adults. This video ethnography fills a gap in exploring how young children orient to praise, analyzing the nature of praise during nurse-child interaction in routine health care encounters. It documents multimodal aspects of praise and self-praise episodes during Draw-a-Man tasks, as parts of routine checkups of 4-year-olds. The analyses are based on detailed transcripts of nurse-child collaboration and of praise episodes, focusing on how nurses praise children and the ways in which individual children (or parents) are involved in direct or indirect self-praise during the interactions. In social interaction among adults, there tends to be an avoidance of self-praise. This study reveals somewhat different patterns among children. Response cries, glee gestures and what we call glee displays were parts of the children's self-praise repertoires. Moreover, children at times acknowledged praise through confirmatory nodding or smiles, what is here seen as children's indirect self-praise. In this assessment context, praise and indirect assessments were part of both nurse-child and parent-child interaction. A major finding is that in many cases, the child's drawing performance was a triadic accomplishment, scaffolded by both the nurse and the accompanying parent.

Keywords
Praise, Self-praise, Indirect praise, Glee displays, Performance, Collaboration
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224649 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2023.09.017 (DOI)001102952100001 ()2-s2.0-85174463823 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-19 Created: 2023-12-19 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Aronsson, K. & Ågren, Y. (2022). Animation in children's gameplay: collaborative action and sibling play. Mind, culture and activity, 29(4), 374-389
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Animation in children's gameplay: collaborative action and sibling play
2022 (English)In: Mind, culture and activity, ISSN 1074-9039, E-ISSN 1532-7884, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 374-389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study documents siblings’ gameplay in detail. Animation has traditionally been seen as a part of game software, but this ethnographic study shows how siblings animate play when talking to game characters as if they are alive, deploying a number of conversational resources for animating talk – response cries, name calling, and “talking back” – fueling and embellishing play. Gameplay thereby involves collaborative action and shifting alignments, both with game characters and with elder or younger siblings. The findings show that animations form parts of children’s emerging gameplay expertise and collaborative action, extending prior work on the architecture of play.

National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213904 (URN)10.1080/10749039.2022.2152050 (DOI)000898502300001 ()2-s2.0-85144321437 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-06 Created: 2023-02-06 Last updated: 2023-06-12Bibliographically approved
Aronsson, K. & Morgenstern, A. (2021). Bravo!: Co-constructing praise in French family life. Journal of Pragmatics, 173, 1-14
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bravo!: Co-constructing praise in French family life
2021 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 173, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Children and praise is an under-researched area that is addressed in this study, which explores in detail praise sequences in parent-child interaction in French family life (45 h; video). Language socialization practices (Ochs & Schieffelin, 1989, 2012) are analyzed in verbal praise sequences, including response cries – like ‘ouais’, ‘bravo’, ‘oh là là’ – and audible glee (Goffman, 1978) as well as what we have called glee gestures (e.g. applauds, victory gestures). Work in conversation analysis has shown that adults avoid self-praise. This study extends prior work on praise, showing that young children (toddlers) recurrently deployed self-praise. Moreover, they engaged in role reversal play, when recycling adults' praise. They talked to themselves, using prior praise like mantras, when engaging in demanding novel tasks and they smiled and laughed in self-celebration. The findings contribute to language socialization theory in showing that children's self-praise was linked to adult praise and to scaffolding and joyful emotion sharing. Praise was co-construed and upgraded through an array of resources, and the children's actions were sequentially transformed into accomplishments. In its multimodal enactment, praise may change ordinary actions into extraordinary feats, momentarily transforming little children into the celebrated heroes of family life.

Keywords
Self-praise, Emotion sharing, Upgraded praise, Glee gestures, Role reversals, Multimodal action
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-193290 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2020.12.002 (DOI)000614145100001 ()
Available from: 2021-05-21 Created: 2021-05-21 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Kilger, M. & Aronsson, K. (2020). Being a good sport: players' uptake to coaches' joking in interviews for the youth national team. Sport Coaching Review, 9(2), 185-207
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a good sport: players' uptake to coaches' joking in interviews for the youth national team
2020 (English)In: Sport Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 185-207Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper draws on detailed analyses of authentic coach-athlete interviews during the final selection camp for the Swedish national youth team in hockey. The audio-recorded interviews between the coaches and the individual players (20 players and two national team coaches) covered various issues, involving both the individual players´ goal-setting and sports character, as displayed in his self-presentation during the interview. If the presumptive elite level player presented a vague or low goal or an overly humble self-presentation, this was contested by the coach through jokes, laughter or ironic teasing. Such conversational joking exchanges formed part of each coach´s toolkit for giving critical feedback to interview questions. In their uptake to the coaches playful corrections, the players were expected to engage in po-faced receipt or to laugh along. The selection involved character contests both on the ice rink and in the talk-in-interaction that formed part of the performance appraisal procedure.

Keywords
Humor, assessment sequences, performance appraisal interviews, coach-athlete interaction, character contests
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-185654 (URN)10.1080/21640629.2019.1605727 (DOI)000561793100001 ()
Available from: 2020-10-12 Created: 2020-10-12 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Aronsson, K. (2020). Micro dramas and morality-in-interaction: A commentary. Text & Talk, 40(5), 695-703
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Micro dramas and morality-in-interaction: A commentary
2020 (English)In: Text & Talk, ISSN 1860-7330, E-ISSN 1860-7349, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 695-703Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-216432 (URN)10.1515/text-2020-2083 (DOI)000569280700007 ()2-s2.0-85089826691 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-14 Created: 2023-04-14 Last updated: 2023-04-14Bibliographically approved
Aronsson, K. (2020). Myths about bilingual learning in family life settings: Werner Leopold's child language biographies and contemporary work on children's play practices. Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, 26, Article ID 100226.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Myths about bilingual learning in family life settings: Werner Leopold's child language biographies and contemporary work on children's play practices
2020 (English)In: Learning, Culture and Social Interaction, ISSN 2210-6561, E-ISSN 2210-657X, Vol. 26, article id 100226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In four volumes, Werner Leopold documented his first child's acquisition of German and English (e.g. 1939; 1949). In this article I problematize contemporary myths about bilingualism that partly date back to Leopold's pioneering work and his theorizing about the one-language/one- person method of language development. Notably, this method worked for his first-born, but not for his second child, whose very existence has often not been noted. A dyadic bias – privileging the study of one parent/one child – has led to a neglect of the role of siblings and peers. Moreover, a cognitive bias has led to an under-analysis of the role of play in language acquisition. On the basis of work on play practices and activity settings, this paper addresses these biases, highlighting the role of social demands and play communities for multilingual development. Several explanations are presented for why Leopold's second child did not speak German. In foregrounding the social situation of development and the role of play, this paper advocates more holistic approaches, including the study of hybrid improvisations in everyday practices.

Keywords
Multilingualism, Social situation, Play practices, Activity setting, Dyadic bias, Hybridity
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics
Research subject
Child and Youth Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-164383 (URN)10.1016/j.lcsi.2018.03.011 (DOI)000569178700010 ()
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Gottzén, L. & Aronsson, K. (2019). ‘A Darwinist at Our Dinner Table?’ Discursive Transitions Between School and Home. In: Mariane Hedegaard, Marilyn Fleer (Ed.), Children’s transitions in everyday life and institutions: (pp. 167-184). London: Bloomsbury Academic
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘A Darwinist at Our Dinner Table?’ Discursive Transitions Between School and Home
2019 (English)In: Children’s transitions in everyday life and institutions / [ed] Mariane Hedegaard, Marilyn Fleer, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019, p. 167-184Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2019
Series
Transitions in childhood and youth
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Child and Youth Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-166883 (URN)9781350021457 (ISBN)9781350021471 (ISBN)
Available from: 2019-03-06 Created: 2019-03-06 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Sjöblom, B., Franzén, A. & Aronsson, K. (2018). Contested connectedness in child custody narratives: Mobile phones and children's rights and responsibilities. New Media and Society, 20(10), 3818-3835
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contested connectedness in child custody narratives: Mobile phones and children's rights and responsibilities
2018 (English)In: New Media and Society, ISSN 1461-4448, E-ISSN 1461-7315, Vol. 20, no 10, p. 3818-3835Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New forms of information and communications technology (ICT) form parts of contemporary communication. At large, connected presence (e.g. through mobile phones) is seen as something positive that facilitates social connectedness in family life. Yet, there are also instances of what we call contested connectedness. This article analyses courtroom proceedings in child custody disputes. The analyses (from 68 audio-recorded high-conflict trials) highlight how mobile phone connectedness reshapes boundaries of public/private in post-separation family life. A number of cases were chosen to illuminate different ways in which connectedness through mobile phone contacts was contested by the child or one of the parents. Three cases document recurring ways in which children's rights and responsibilities were intertwined in complex ways in post-divorce life and how mobile phone connectedness would not offer the child new rights, yet make them more responsible for monitoring their parents' unresolved problems.

Keywords
Children's responsibilities, children's rights, connected presence, contested connectedness, courtroom interaction, custody dispute, mobile phones, public, private, surveillance
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161015 (URN)10.1177/1461444818761015 (DOI)000446033800016 ()
Available from: 2018-10-15 Created: 2018-10-15 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
Aronsson, K. (2018). Negative interrogatives and adversarial uptake: Building hostility in child custody examinations. Journal of Pragmatics, 136, 39-53
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative interrogatives and adversarial uptake: Building hostility in child custody examinations
2018 (English)In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 136, p. 39-53Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study documents the adversarial role of negative interrogatives in courtroom talk. It involves a large set of audio-recordings of child custody proceedings. The focus is on sequences where different attorneys examined conflicting parents in two contexts: their own client versus the other side parent. Overwhelmingly, negative interrogatives were located, not in the first round of questions (same side), but during the cross-examination of the other side. The analytical focus is on parents' uptake to the attorneys' questions (in a collection of 289 negative interrogatives; from 156 examinations). All negative interrogatives, such as 'So the children won't see their grandma?', were cast in a polar format, projecting minimal yes-/no-responses. Yet, the parents' uptake featured expanded responses defensive accounts and counter-blame beyond minimal responses. Hostility was built up sequentially through the parents' uptake in the form of counter-blame and other re-allocations of blame. The blame accounts were highlighted through extreme case formulations, rhetorical comments and other discursive devices. In this courtroom context, the parents were to answer, not to ask questions. Yet, they at times confronted the court, through metapragmatic questions, disrupting the interaction order of the courtroom. In numerous ways, negative interrogatives were related to adversarial features and escalation.

Keywords
Negative interrogatives, Adversarial formats, Hostility, Blame-account sequences, Courtroom interaction
National Category
Languages and Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161996 (URN)10.1016/j.pragma.2018.08.008 (DOI)000448095500004 ()
Available from: 2018-11-19 Created: 2018-11-19 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Franzén, A. & Aronsson, K. (2018). Then she got a spanking': Social accountability and narrative versions in social workers' courtroom testimonies. Discourse Studies, 20(5), 577-597
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Then she got a spanking': Social accountability and narrative versions in social workers' courtroom testimonies
2018 (English)In: Discourse Studies, ISSN 1461-4456, E-ISSN 1461-7080, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 577-597Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Courtroom talk in child custody interrogations recurrently features contrasting event descriptions about what happened', as well as contrasting person descriptions. This case study - from a large set of audio-recorded courtroom examinations - documents how social workers' contrasting narrative versions about alleged domestic violence are related to divergent problem formulations. Blame-account sequences feature descriptions of a particular event as violent or nonviolent and descriptions of a new partner as non-adult' or merely as impulsive' but concerned'. Other contrasting person descriptions feature a target child either as normal' or as someone who has a diagnosis'. This involves categorizations of the particular child either as a victim (normal child') or as someone with a diagnosis', two contrasting accounts that provide divergent explanatory formulations of what the overall problem is. Ultimately, divergent testimonies also reflect how social accounts in court reflect both mitigated/aggravated descriptions of violence and divergent accounts of parents' and children's agency and accountability.

Keywords
Categorizations, child custody disputes, courtroom talk, event descriptions, narrative versions, person descriptions, problem formulation, social accountability
National Category
Social Work Social Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161179 (URN)10.1177/1461445618760605 (DOI)000444084600001 ()
Available from: 2018-11-05 Created: 2018-11-05 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7383-540X

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