Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Melin, Marika
Publications (5 of 5) Show all publications
Melin, M., Astvik, W. & Bernhard-Oettel, C. (2014). New work demands in higher education: a study of the relationship between excessive workload, coping strategies and subsequent health among academic staff. Quality in Higher Education, 20(3), 290-308
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New work demands in higher education: a study of the relationship between excessive workload, coping strategies and subsequent health among academic staff
2014 (English)In: Quality in Higher Education, ISSN 1353-8322, E-ISSN 1470-1081, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 290-308Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigates the relationship between the work conditions in higher education work settings, the academic staff’s strategies for handling excessive workload and impact on well-being and work-life balance. The results show that there is a risk that staff in academic work places will start using compensatory coping strategies to deal with excessive demands and that this might seriously impair their health. The compensatory strategy cluster emerged as a ‘risk group’ among the three identified strategy clusters, having a lower work-life balance and suffering from stress-related symptoms more often than the other two strategy clusters. The results also show that high educational level, management position and wide discretion as regards regulation of work in time and space (when and where to work) are factors that might contribute to a lower work-life balance. In practice, the results can contribute to create more sustainable work environments by detecting risk behaviours and risk factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Abingdon: Routledge, 2014
Keywords
higher education, academic staff, work demands, coping strategies, health, work environment
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-112204 (URN)10.1080/13538322.2014.979547 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-01-09 Created: 2015-01-09 Last updated: 2022-02-23Bibliographically approved
Astvik, W., Melin, M. & Allvin, M. (2014). Survival strategies in social work: A study of how coping strategies affect service quality, professionalism and employee health. Nordic Social Work Research, 4(1), 52-66
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Survival strategies in social work: A study of how coping strategies affect service quality, professionalism and employee health
2014 (English)In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 52-66Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The restructuring of human service organisations into more lean organisations has brought increased work demands for many human service professions. Social work stands out as a particularly exposed occupational group, in which high work demands are paired with a large individual responsibility to carry out the job. The objectives of the study were to identify what kind of coping strategies social workers employ to handle the imbalance between demands and resources in work and to investigate how different strategies affect outcomes regarding health, service quality and professional development. 16 individual interviews and four group interviews with another 16 social workers were conducted. The analysis identified five different main types of strategies: Compensatory, Demand-reducing, Disengagement, Voice and Exit. An extensive use of compensatory strategies was connected with negative outcomes in health. Often these compensatory strategies were replaced or combined with different means of reducing the work demands, which in turn influence performance and service quality in a negative way. The results highlight dilemmas the social workers are facing when the responsibility to deal with this imbalance are “decentralised” to the individual social worker. When resources do not match the organisational goals or quality standards, the social workers are forced into strategies that either endanger their own health or threaten the quality of service.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2014
Keywords
social work, coping, work conditions, employee health, service quality, professionalism
National Category
Applied Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-96959 (URN)10.1080/2156857X.2013.801879 (DOI)
Projects
Strategier för hälsa och kvalitet i välfärdstjänstearbete
Funder
AFA Insurance, Dnr 060004
Available from: 2013-11-29 Created: 2013-11-29 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Astvik, W. & Melin, M. (2013). Coping with the imbalance between job demands and resources: A study of different coping patterns and implications for health and quality in human service work. Journal of Social Work, 13(4), 337-360
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coping with the imbalance between job demands and resources: A study of different coping patterns and implications for health and quality in human service work
2013 (English)In: Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1468-0173, E-ISSN 1741-296X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 337-360Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent decades the public welfare sector has been subjected to major structural changes, and studies of various occupational groups within human service work have reported increased workload and a high prevalence of work-related stress. Using questionnaire data from a sample of human service workers within social work, child care and elderly care, the aim of this study was to identify different patterns of coping strategies to manage the imbalance between work demands and resources, and then to investigate their impact on outcomes in employee health and service quality. Findings: Cluster analysis identified three strategy profiles: compensatory and quality reducing, voice and support seeking and self-supporting, and the comparative analysis indicated that the compensatory and quality reducing cluster may be regarded as a risk group. Results of hierarchical regression analyses disclosed that the identified strategies affected health outcomes as well as perceived service quality. The use of compensatory and quality reducing strategies was negatively related to health and quality, although work demands, resources and background characteristics were controlled for. Applications: The results add to the research field through the identification of compensatory and quality reducing strategies not previously described in the coping literature, as well as the risks associated with them. Applied in practice, the identified strategy clusters might help distinguish risk behaviors' from more beneficial strategies. The results also point toward the importance of providing organizational structures that allow the employees to voice their opinions and critique, as well as to give and receive social support.

Keywords
Coping, employee health, human service work, job stress, service quality, social work
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-92639 (URN)10.1177/1468017311434682 (DOI)000321199700001 ()
Note

AuthorCount:2;

Available from: 2013-08-19 Created: 2013-08-14 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Astvik, W. & Melin, M. (2013). Överlevnadsstrategier i socialt arbete: hur påverkar copingstrategier kvalitet och hälsa?. Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, 19(4), 61-73
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Överlevnadsstrategier i socialt arbete: hur påverkar copingstrategier kvalitet och hälsa?
2013 (Swedish)In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, E-ISSN 2002-343X, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [sv]

Förändringarna inom välfärdstjänstesektorn i Sverige har det senaste decenniet varit genomgripande. Rationaliseringar och ett decentraliserat resultat- och kostnadsansvar har i många fall medfört ökade arbetskrav, och socialsekreterares situation framstår som särskilt svår. Ansvaret att hantera obalansen mellan krav och resurser har decentraliserats till den enskilde socialsekreteraren. När resurserna inte matchar de kvalitetskrav som ställs tvingas socialsekreterarna tillämpa strategier som antingen äventyrar deras egen hälsa eller kvaliteten i arbetet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Arbetsmarknadsstyrelsen, 2013
Keywords
socialsekreterare, arbetsmiljö, coping, stress
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-99099 (URN)
Available from: 2014-01-11 Created: 2014-01-11 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Döös, M., Backström, T., Melin, M. & Wilhelmson, L. (2012). Isolated cases or widespread practice?: The occurrence of sharing managers in Swedish working life. Economics and Business Letters, 1(3), 23-36
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Isolated cases or widespread practice?: The occurrence of sharing managers in Swedish working life
2012 (English)In: Economics and Business Letters, ISSN 2254-4380, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 23-36Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In investigating whether shared leadership can be tracked on a work-life level, this study aims to contribute knowledge about how common shared leadership is among managers in Sweden. A search was made for equal assumption of responsibilities and, specifically, for joint leadership, i.e. a formal mandate for decision-making affecting the full range of responsibilities attaching to the managerial post. The results show that shared leadership is tracked on a work-life level, and that the most far-reaching form joint leadership was found among 5 % of the managers. Thus, the phenomenon cannot be ignored as anecdotal. This adds relevance to influencing perceptions of leadership towards more pluralism, in which questions of leadership naturally incorporate more interactive variations than does the hitherto accepted theory of singular leadership. 

Keywords
joint leadership, manager, managerial post, national survey, work organization
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-82100 (URN)10.17811/ebl.1.3.2012.23-36 (DOI)
Funder
Vinnova
Available from: 2012-11-08 Created: 2012-11-08 Last updated: 2022-02-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications