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Publications (10 of 37) Show all publications
Xiang, B., Allen, W. L., Khosravi, S., Kringelbach, H. N., Ortiga, Y. Y., Liao, K. A., . . . Naik, M. (2023). Shock Mobilities During Moments of Acute Uncertainty. Geopolitics, 28(4), 1632-1657
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shock Mobilities During Moments of Acute Uncertainty
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2023 (English)In: Geopolitics, ISSN 1465-0045, E-ISSN 1557-3028, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 1632-1657Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The COVID-19 pandemic and interventions addressing it raise important questions about human mobility that have geopolitical implications. This forum uses mobility and immobility during the pandemic as lenses onto the ways that routinised state power reacts to acute uncertainties, as well as how these reactions impact politics and societies. Specifically, we propose the concept of “shock mobility” as migratory routines radically reconfigured: emergency flights from epicentres, mass repatriations, lockdowns, quarantines. Patterns of shock mobility and immobility are not new categories of movement, but rather are significant alterations to the timing, duration, intensity, and relations among existing movements. Many of these alterations have been induced by governments’ reactions to the pandemic in both migrant-sending and receiving contexts, which can be especially consequential for migrants in and from the Global South. Our interventions explore these processes by highlighting experiences of Afghans and Kurds along Iran’s borders, Western Africans in Europe, Filipino workers, irregular Bangladeshis in Qatar, Central Americans travelling northwards via Mexico, and rural-urban migrants in India. In total, we argue that tracing shocks’ dynamics in a comparative manner provides an analytical means for assessing the long-term implications of the pandemic, building theories about how and why any particular post-crisis world emerges as it does, and paving the way for future empirical work. 

National Category
Social and Economic Geography Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-208014 (URN)10.1080/14650045.2022.2091314 (DOI)000829873100001 ()2-s2.0-85136359990 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-16 Created: 2022-08-16 Last updated: 2023-06-09Bibliographically approved
De Genova, N., Tazzioli, M., Aradau, C., Bhandar, B., Bojadzijev, M., Cisneros, J. D., . . . Walters, W. (2022). Minor keywords of political theory: Migration as a critical standpoint. Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, 40(4), 781-875
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Minor keywords of political theory: Migration as a critical standpoint
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2022 (English)In: Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, ISSN 2399-6544, E-ISSN 2399-6552, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 781-875Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Regional & Urban Planning
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-208099 (URN)10.1177/2399654420988563 (DOI)000812309300001 ()
Available from: 2022-08-19 Created: 2022-08-19 Last updated: 2022-08-19Bibliographically approved
Mahmoud, K. & Khosravi, S. (Eds.). (2022). Seeing Like a Smuggler: Borders from Below. London: Pluto Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seeing Like a Smuggler: Borders from Below
2022 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The word smuggler often unleashes a simplified, negative image painted by the media and the authorities. Such state-centric perspectives hide many social, political and economic relations generated by smuggling. This book looks at the practice through the eyes of the smugglers, revealing how their work can be productive, subversive and deeply sociopolitical.

By tracing the illegalised movement of people and goods across borders, Seeing Like a Smuggler shows smuggling as a contradiction within the nation-state system, and in a dialectical relation with the national order of things. It raises questions on how smuggling engages and unsettles the ethics, materialities, visualities, histories and the colonial power relations that form borders and bordering.

Covering a wide spectrum of approaches from personal reflections and ethnographies to historical accounts, cultural analysis and visual essays, the book spans the globe from Colombia to Ethiopia, Singapore to Guatemala, Afghanistan to Zimbabwe, and from Kurdistan to Bangladesh, to show how people deal with global inequalities and the restrictions of poverty and immobility.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Pluto Press, 2022. p. 208
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213062 (URN)9781786808387 (ISBN)9780745341613 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-12-19 Created: 2022-12-19 Last updated: 2023-03-09Bibliographically approved
Khosravi, S. (Ed.). (2021). Waiting: A project in Conversation. Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Waiting: A project in Conversation
2021 (English)Collection (editor) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Waiting is an inescapable part of life in modern societies. We all wait, albeit differently and for different reasons. Waiting is a particular experience of time, shaped by class, race, and gender. In modern societies, time is associated with success and money. It can be counted, saved, spent, lost, wasted or invested. Hence waiting symbolizes waste, emptiness, and uselessness. What does it mean to wait for a long period of time? How do people narrate their waiting? The book is a combination of text and images, by scholars, artists, architects, and curators whose works deal with waiting in various situations and geographies

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bielefeld: Transcript Verlag, 2021. p. 188
Series
Culture & theory
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-213063 (URN)9783839454589 (ISBN)9783837654585 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-12-19 Created: 2022-12-19 Last updated: 2023-03-09Bibliographically approved
Khosravi, S. (2019). What do we see if we look at the border from the other side?. Social Anthropology, 27(3), 409-424
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do we see if we look at the border from the other side?
2019 (English)In: Social Anthropology, ISSN 0964-0282, E-ISSN 1469-8676, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 409-424Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We live in a time of wall fetishism. Never have human beings been so obsessed with building walls as they are today. Walls are, however, age-old. Empires built walls. And if we look closer, we can see that there are still traces of the old imperial visions in the modern borders and border walls. In this essay I will look at the connections of wars and walls, walls and empires. Through a radical historicisation I will argue that there is a link between the installation of border walls (here) and the unsettling of communities (there). The current border regime is part of a larger and older project of colonial accumulation by dispossession and expulsion; stealing wealth, labour force and time. I will also argue that border crossing discloses the cracks in the dominant narration of borders and that travellers without papers denaturalise what are otherwise naturalised borders, and politicise what are otherwise depoliticised borders. I will illustrate this argument by following travellers without papers along the railways in the Balkans; tracing Afghan deportees in Kabul; and following the social life of the materialities used in the oil sites in Iran and in the wall between Mexico and the USA.

Keywords
borders, time, unearthing, unsettling, stealing, migration
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-175893 (URN)10.1111/1469-8676.12685 (DOI)000487738300002 ()
Available from: 2019-11-27 Created: 2019-11-27 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Khosravi, S. (2018). A FRAGMENTED DIASPORA: Iranians in Sweden. Nordic Journal of Migration Research, 8(2), 73-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A FRAGMENTED DIASPORA: Iranians in Sweden
2018 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The notion of diaspora generally indicates achievements: creating a home outside the homeland, entrepreneurship, the establishment of local and global networks, new organisations, media and spatial as well as social mobility. In studies of Iranian diaspora, a rosy picture of 'super successful' Iranians has often obscured other aspects of the diaspora - failure, conflicts, internal exclusion and fragmentation of the group along various lines, such as ideologies, class, gender, local identification and cause of migration. Through ethnographic vignettes of the Iranian migrants in Sweden, this article demonstrates the segmentation, hybridity and complexity of the experiences of the diaspora. Avoiding the language of generalisation and by focussing instead on particular histories and individual circumstances, it reveals the diversity, disintegration and contradictions within what has been assumed to be a homogeneous and static diaspora.

Keywords
Sweden, Iranians, Segmented diaspora, Internal diversity, Refugees
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-159154 (URN)10.1515/njmr-2018-0013 (DOI)000440278900001 ()
Available from: 2018-08-28 Created: 2018-08-28 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Khosravi, S. (2018). Stolen time. Radical philosophy (203), 38-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stolen time
2018 (English)In: Radical philosophy, ISSN 0300-211X, no 203, p. 38-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-166860 (URN)000456348500006 ()
Available from: 2019-03-06 Created: 2019-03-06 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Khosravi, S. (2017). Precarious lives: waiting and hope in Iran. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Precarious lives: waiting and hope in Iran
2017 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In Precarious Lives, Shahram Khosravi attempts to reconcile the paradoxes of Iranians' everyday life in the first decade of the twenty-first century. On the one hand, multiple circumstances of precarity give rise to a sense of hopelessness, shared visions of a futureless tomorrow, widespread home(land)lessness, intense individualism, and a growth of incivilities. On the other, daydreaming and hope, as well as civility and solidarity in political protests, street carnivals, and social movements, continue to persist. Young Iranians describe themselves as being stuck in purposelessness and forced to endure endless waiting, and they are also aware that they are perceived as unproductive and a burden on their society. Despite the aspirations and inspiration they possess, they find themselves forced into petrifying social and spatial immobility. Uncertainty in the present, a seemingly futureless tomorrow: these are the circumstances that Khosravi explores in Precarious Lives.

Creating an intricate and moving portrait of contemporary Iranian life, Khosravi weaves together individual stories, government reports, statistics, and cultural analysis of art and literature to depict how Iranians react to the experience of precarity and the possibility of hope. Drawing on extensive ethnographic engagement with youth in Tehran and Isfahan as well as with migrant workers in rural areas, Khosravi examines the complexities and contradictions of everyday life in Iran. Precarious Lives is a vital work of contemporary anthropology that serves as a testament to the shared hardship and hope of the Iranian people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017. p. 274
Series
Contemporary Ethnography
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-155493 (URN)10.9783/9780812293692 (DOI)9780812248876 (ISBN)9780812293692 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2023-02-22Bibliographically approved
Abram, S., Bianco, B. F., Khosravi, S., Salazar, N. & de Genova, N. (2017). The free movement of people around the world would be Utopian: IUAES World Congress 2013. Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, 24(2), 123-155
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The free movement of people around the world would be Utopian: IUAES World Congress 2013
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2017 (English)In: Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power, ISSN 1070-289X, E-ISSN 1547-3384, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 123-155Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article contains the text and discussion of a debate held at the IUAES World Congress in Anthropology at Manchester University in 2013. The motion was proposed by Bela Feldman-Bianco (State University of Campinas), seconded by Noel Salazar (University of Leuven) and was opposed by Shahram Khosravi (Stockholm University), seconded by Nicholas de Genova (then at Goldsmiths' College). The debate was chaired by Simone Abram (Durham University).

Keywords
Inequality, mobility, borders, utopia, freedom, movement
National Category
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-143855 (URN)10.1080/1070289X.2016.1142879 (DOI)000399360500001 ()
Available from: 2017-06-05 Created: 2017-06-05 Last updated: 2022-02-28Bibliographically approved
Khosravi, S. (2017). The Precarious Status of Working-Class Men in Iran. Current history (1941), 116(794), 355-359
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Precarious Status of Working-Class Men in Iran
2017 (English)In: Current history (1941), ISSN 0011-3530, E-ISSN 1944-785X, Vol. 116, no 794, p. 355-359Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The sociopolitical transition can be observed best in the shift of the symbolic position of working-class men: from veneration in the first decade after the revolution to condemnation three decades later.

National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Social Anthropology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-154683 (URN)10.1525/curh.2017.116.794.355 (DOI)000426333400005 ()
Available from: 2018-04-23 Created: 2018-04-23 Last updated: 2022-03-31Bibliographically approved
Projects
What happens after Deportation? A study of deported Afghan asylum seekers from Sweden [2016-00634_Forte]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7675-4130

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