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Glav Lundin, Linnea
Publications (3 of 3) Show all publications
Eriksson, O. & Glav Lundin, L. (2021). Legacies of historic charcoal production affect the forest flora in a Swedish mining district. Nordic Journal of Botany, 39(11), Article ID e03312.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Legacies of historic charcoal production affect the forest flora in a Swedish mining district
2021 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 39, no 11, article id e03312Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Iron production was historically associated with major impacts on forests worldwide, as vast amounts of wood were harvested to produce the charcoal needed for heating the furnaces and reducing iron oxides in the ore to iron. This impact has left abundant legacies which potentially may remain in the present-day vegetation. We investigated how remains of historic charcoal production, mainly from the 18th to the early 20th century, at still remaining charcoal kiln platforms (CKPs), affect the current species richness, species occurrences and cover of vascular plants in the ground vegetation in a Swedish mining district located in the boreo-nemoral forest zone. CKPs have a significantly higher species richness than the surrounding forest, and they also affect cover (negatively) for ericaceous species typically dominating the forest ground vegetation. Several forest species are more frequent at CKPs, and these also harbor significantly more uncommon species, of which many are typical for traditionally managed grasslands. These latter species are likely to represent remnants in present-day forests reflecting former land-use such as livestock grazing. The soil chemistry at CKPs is strongly deviating from the surrounding forest, and this, together with a lower cover of ericaceous shrubs, are the most likely mechanisms behind the higher species richness. CKPs represent conspicuous and abundant historic anthropogenic habitats in the forest vegetation. As far as we are aware, the flora at CKPs in boreal and boreo-nemoral forests has not previously been investigated in detail, and they deserve more attention, both from a biological and a cultural–historical perspective. 

Keywords
biological cultural heritage, boreo-nemoral forests, charcoal kiln platforms, relict charcoal hearths, remnant populations, species richness
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-216422 (URN)10.1111/njb.03312 (DOI)000706646600001 ()2-s2.0-85116899610 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-13 Created: 2023-04-13 Last updated: 2023-04-13Bibliographically approved
Glav Lundin, L. & Eriksson, O. (2021). The decline of Gentianella campestris: three decades of population development of an endangered grassland plant in Sweden. Nordic Journal of Botany, 39(3), Article ID e03007.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The decline of Gentianella campestris: three decades of population development of an endangered grassland plant in Sweden
2021 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 39, no 3, article id e03007Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Species-rich semi-natural grasslands are declining all over northern Europe, and many plant species confined to such grasslands are currently under threat. We studied the development of populations of one such species, the field gentian Gentianella campestris, during three decades in the County of Södermanland, south of Stockholm, Sweden. Gentianella campestris is Red Listed as Endangered in Sweden. It is a strict biennial, and as far as known with only a transient seed bank. Large population fluctuations are a characteristic of this species, and its life history makes the species inherently sensitive to factors causing population reductions. We found that the number of sites with G. campestris has declined with over 60% in the last three decades. The total number of flowering individuals also show a strong decreasing trend, although there was an increase the last year (2020) at a few remaining sites. Cessation of grazing management is a major cause of the decline, but populations also disappeared from managed sites. It is possible that the management has been inappropriate, and circumstantial evidence suggests that summer drought might be an additional cause of population decline. Data from 2018, a year with an exceptional summer drought, supports this explanation. A sowing experiment indicated that recruitment of new populations is unlikely in the present-day landscape where most vegetation is unsuitable for G. campestris. Due to the poor prospects for long-term maintenance of grazing management in still remaining semi-natural grasslands, and the decline even at sites with current management, G. campestris faces a risk of becoming regionally extinct within the coming decades.

Keywords
drought effects, grazing management, population extinction rates, seed sowing experiment, semi-natural grasslands
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-193401 (URN)10.1111/njb.03007 (DOI)000636313500001 ()
Available from: 2021-05-22 Created: 2021-05-22 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, O. & Glav Lundin, L. (2020). 'Gooseberry is the only thing left' - a study of declining biological cultural heritage at abandoned crofts in the province of Sodermanland, Sweden. International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), 26(11), 1061-1076
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Gooseberry is the only thing left' - a study of declining biological cultural heritage at abandoned crofts in the province of Sodermanland, Sweden
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1061-1076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This is a study about cultivated and 'wild' plants as components of the material heritage of crofters, an overlooked group of people in former agrarian landscapes. Despite abundant remains of crofts in Sweden, inhabited during the period from the eighteenth century until the 1940s, crofters have been subject to few studies. We used a survey conducted 1967 of botanical remains at abandoned croft as a basis for a re-survey in 2019. As with all biological traces of former human activities, cultivated plants and wild species favoured by former management ultimately disappear, but with long delays. We describe the patterns of this decline. In general, about a third of the species were gone after 52 years. The rate of disappearance of single species occurrences was about 1% annually. We discuss the interpretation of botanical remains from since long abandoned crofts in the context of heritage. In some cases, the botanical remains were the only material evidence left. We conclude that the material heritage of crofters deserves further studies and that botanical remains at abandoned crofts should be documented and at least at some sites protected.

Keywords
Agrarian landscapes, boreal forest, cultivated plants, ethnobotany
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-180384 (URN)10.1080/13527258.2020.1731704 (DOI)000515778700001 ()
Available from: 2020-04-01 Created: 2020-04-01 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
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