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Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2019-0222
Publications (2 of 2) Show all publications
Callinan, S., Karriker-Jaffe, K. J., Roberts, S. C. M., Cook, W., Kuntsche, S., Grittner, U., . . . Wilsnack, S. (2022). A gender-focused multilevel analysis of how country, regional and individual level factors relate to harm from others' drinking. Drugs: education prevention and policy, 29(1), 13-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A gender-focused multilevel analysis of how country, regional and individual level factors relate to harm from others' drinking
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2022 (English)In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 13-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The aim of this study was to examine how gender, age and education, regional prevalence of male and female risky drinking and country-level economic gender equality are associated with harms from other people's drinking.

Methods: 24,823 adults in 10 countries were surveyed about harms from drinking by people they know and strangers. Country-level economic gender equality and regional prevalence of risky drinking along with age and gender were entered as independent variables into three-level random intercept models predicting alcohol-related harm.

Findings: At the individual level, younger respondents were consistently more likely to report harms from others' drinking, while, for women, higher education was associated with lower risk of harms from known drinkers but higher risk of harms from strangers. Regional rate of men's risky drinking was associated with known and stranger harm, while regional-level women's risky drinking was associated with harm from strangers. Gender equality was only associated with harms in models that did not include risky drinking.

Conclusions: Youth and regional levels of men's drinking were consistently associated with harm from others attributable to alcohol. Policies that decrease the risky drinking of men would be likely to reduce harms attributable to the drinking of others.

Keywords
Alcohol, harm to others, gender
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-193408 (URN)10.1080/09687637.2020.1776684 (DOI)000629439800001 ()
Available from: 2021-05-22 Created: 2021-05-22 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved
Laslett, A.-M., Stanesby, O., Graham, K., Callinan, S., Karriker-Jaffe, K. J., Wilsnack, S., . . . Room, R. (2020). Children's experience of physical harms and exposure to family violence from others' drinking in nine societies. Addiction Research and Theory, 28(4), 354-364
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children's experience of physical harms and exposure to family violence from others' drinking in nine societies
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2020 (English)In: Addiction Research and Theory, ISSN 1606-6359, E-ISSN 1476-7392, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 354-364Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To study caregiver reports of children's experience of physical harm and exposure to family violence due to others' drinking in nine societies, assess the relationship of harm with household drinking pattern and evaluate whether gender and education of caregiver affect these relationships. Method: Using data on adult caregivers from the Gender and Alcohol's Harm to Others (GENAHTO) project, child alcohol-related injuries and exposure of children to alcohol-related violence (CAIV) rates are estimated by country and pooled using meta-analysis and stratified by gender of the caregiver. Households with and without heavy or harmful drinker(s) (HHDs) are compared to assess the interaction of caregiver gender on the relationship between reporting HHD and CAIV, adjusting for caregiver education and age. Additionally, the relationship between caregiver education and CAIV is analyzed with meta-regression. Results: The prevalence of CAIV varied across societies, with an overall pooled mean of 4% reported by caregivers. HHD was a consistent correlate of CAIV in all countries. Men and women in the sample reported similar levels of CAIV overall, but the relationship between HHD and CAIV was greater for women than for men, especially if the HHD was the most harmful drinker (MHD). Education was not significantly associated with CAIV. Conclusions: One in 25 caregivers with children report physical or family violence harms to children because of others' drinking. The adjusted odds of harm are significantly greater (more than four-fold) in households with an HHD, with men most likely to be defined as this drinker in the household.

Keywords
Alcohol's harm to children, child maltreatment, child injury, family violence, meta-analysis, harm to others
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-179833 (URN)10.1080/16066359.2019.1704272 (DOI)000504603500001 ()
Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-03-10 Last updated: 2022-02-26Bibliographically approved
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2019-0222

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