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Åkerstedt, TorbjörnORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8049-8504
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Publications (10 of 207) Show all publications
Xiong, Y., Tvedt, J., Åkerstedt, T., Cadar, D. & Wang, H.-X. (2024). Impact of sleep duration and sleep disturbances on the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease: A 10-year follow-up study. Psychiatry Research, 333, Article ID 115760.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of sleep duration and sleep disturbances on the incidence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease: A 10-year follow-up study
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2024 (English)In: Psychiatry Research, ISSN 0165-1781, E-ISSN 1872-7123, Vol. 333, article id 115760Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The nature of the relationship between sleep problems and dementia remains unclear. This study investigated the relationship between sleep measures and dementia in older adults (≥ 65) using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) and further investigated the causal association in Mendelian randomization (MR) analysis. In total of 7,223 individuals, 5.7 % developed dementia (1.7 % Alzheimer's disease (AD)) within an average of 8 (± 2.9) years. Cox regression models and MR were employed. Long sleep duration (>8 h) was associated with 64 % increased risk of incident dementia and 2-fold high risk of AD compared to ideal sleep duration (7–8 h). This association was particularly evident in older-older adults (≥70 years) and those who consumed alcohol. Short sleep duration (<7 h) was associated with lower risk of incident dementia among older-older but higher risk among younger-older adults. Sleep disturbances and perceived sleep quality were not associated with dementia or AD. The MR study did not reveal causal associations between sleep duration and dementia. These findings suggest that self-reported short sleep in younger-older and long sleep in older-older adults and those with frequent alcohol consumption are associated with dementia. Early detection of these sleep patterns may help identify individuals at higher dementia risk.

Keywords
Sleep duration, Sleep disturbances, Dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Mendelian randomization
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences Geriatrics Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-228137 (URN)10.1016/j.psychres.2024.115760 (DOI)001180166800001 ()38301285 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85183958998 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-10 Created: 2024-04-10 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Åkerstedt, T., Bellocco, R., Widman, L., Eriksson, J., Ye, W., Adami, H.-O. & Trolle Lagerros, Y. (2024). The association of short and long sleep with mortality in men and women. Journal of Sleep Research, 33(2), Article ID e13931.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association of short and long sleep with mortality in men and women
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 33, no 2, article id e13931Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Both short (< 6 hr) and long (> 8 hr) sleep are associated with increased mortality. We here investigated whether the association between sleep duration and all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortality differs between men and women. A cohort of 34,311 participants (mean age and standard deviation = 50.5 ± 15.5 years, 65% women), with detailed assessment of sleep at baseline and up to 20.5 years of follow-up (18 years for cause-specific mortality), was analysed using Cox proportional hazards model to estimate HRs with 95% confidence intervals. After adjustment for covariates, all-cause, cardiovascular disease and cancer mortalities were increased for both < 5 hr and ≥ 9 hr sleep durations (with 6 hr as reference). For all-cause mortality, women who slept < 5 hr had a hazard ratio = 1.54 (95% confidence interval = 1.32–1.80), while the corresponding hazard ratio was 1.05 (95% confidence interval = 0.88–1.27) for men, the interaction being significant (p < 0.05). For cardiovascular disease mortality, exclusion of the first 2 years of exposure, as well as competing risk analysis eliminated the originally significant interaction. Cancer mortality did not show any significant interaction. Survival analysis of the difference between the reference duration (6 hr) and the short duration (< 5 hr) during follow-up showed a gradually steeper reduction of survival time for women than for men for all-cause mortality. We also observed that the lowest cancer mortality appeared for the 5-hr sleep duration. In conclusion, the pattern of association between short sleep duration and all-cause mortality differed between women and men, and the difference between men and women increased with follow-up time.

Keywords
cancer, cardiovascular, gender, sex, sleep duration, survival
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-219565 (URN)10.1111/jsr.13931 (DOI)000987333700001 ()37192602 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85159280776 (Scopus ID)
Note

The present study was supported by The Tercentenary Fund of Bank of Sweden. Ylva Trolle Lagerros was supported by Region Stockholm (clinical research appointment).

Available from: 2023-08-02 Created: 2023-08-02 Last updated: 2024-04-22Bibliographically approved
Rosén, A., D'Onofrio, P., Kaldo, V., Åkerstedt, T. & Jernelöv, S. (2023). A comparison of sleep restriction and sleep compression on objective measures of sleep: A sub-sample from a large randomised controlled trial. Journal of Sleep Research, 32(4), Article ID e13826.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of sleep restriction and sleep compression on objective measures of sleep: A sub-sample from a large randomised controlled trial
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 32, no 4, article id e13826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sleep restriction therapy is a central component of cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia, but can lead to excessive sleepiness, which may impede treatment adherence. Sleep compression therapy has been suggested as a possibly gentler alternative. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of sleep restriction therapy and sleep compression therapy on objective measures of sleep, with a focus on magnitude and timing of effects. From a larger study of participants with insomnia, a sub-sample of 36 underwent polysomnographic recordings, before being randomised to either sleep restriction (n = 19) or sleep compression (n = 17) and receiving online treatment for 10 weeks. Assessments with polysomnography were also carried out after 2, 5, and 10 weeks of treatment. Data were analysed with multilevel linear mixed effect modelling. As per treatment instructions, participants in sleep restriction initially spent shorter time in bed compared with sleep compression. Participants in sleep restriction also showed an initial decrease of total sleep time, which was not seen in the sleep compression group. Both treatments led to improvements in sleep continuity variables, with a tendency for the improvements to come earlier during treatment in sleep restriction. No substantial differences were found between the two treatments 10 weeks after the treatment start. The results indicate that homeostatic sleep pressure may not be as important as a mechanism in sleep compression therapy as in sleep restriction therapy, and an investigation of other mechanisms is needed. In conclusion, the treatments led to similar changes in objective sleep at a somewhat different pace, and possibly through different mechanisms. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
CBT-I, digital treatment, internet therapy, mechanisms, SRT, time in bed regularisation
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215184 (URN)10.1111/jsr.13826 (DOI)000921347700001 ()36709965 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147308137 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was supported by grants from the L. J. Boëthius foundation.

Available from: 2023-03-01 Created: 2023-03-01 Last updated: 2024-01-14Bibliographically approved
Petersen, H., Kecklund, G. & Åkerstedt, T. (2023). Disturbed sleep and its attribution to stress and other causes: A population-based survey. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 64(2), 99-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disturbed sleep and its attribution to stress and other causes: A population-based survey
2023 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, ISSN 0036-5564, E-ISSN 1467-9450, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 99-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study explores the prevalence of attributed causes of disturbed sleep and the association between stress-disturbed sleep and age, sex, and sleep duration on weekdays as well as weekends in a representative sample. A nationally representative sample (n = 1,128, response rate 72.8%), stratified for sex and age, completed a computer-assisted phone survey that included questions about sleep disturbances and attributed causes. Stress was the main attributed cause of sleep disturbance (35.1%), most frequently attributed by younger women (χ2 = 26.5, p < 0.001). Prevalence of stress-disturbed sleep was higher with lower age (B = −0.05, odds ratio (OR) = 0.94, CI = 0.91, 0.98). There was a trend, however, toward a significant interaction between age and sex, with women in the older age-groups more frequently reporting stress-disturbed sleep than older men (B = −0.02, OR = 1.022, CI = 1.003, 1.042). Weekday sleep duration decreased with increased stress-disturbed sleep, with an inverse relationship on weekends except for those reporting stress-disturbed sleep more than 5 days per week (F = 10.5, p < 0.001), who also had the shortest weekend sleep duration. Sleep disturbances were commonly attributed to stress, and more strongly so in women younger than 46 years. Stress-disturbed sleep during weekdays seems to be potentially compensated for with extended sleep on weekends, except for those with continuous stress-disturbed sleep. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
sleep, stress, sleep disturbance, sleep duration, weekend, representative
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-209437 (URN)10.1111/sjop.12867 (DOI)000849525200001 ()36057792 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85137564216 (Scopus ID)
Note

Funding: The Swedish agency for health technology assessment and assessment of social services, Swedish Research Council.

Available from: 2022-09-19 Created: 2022-09-19 Last updated: 2024-01-13Bibliographically approved
Åkerstedt, T., Olsson, T., Alfredsson, L. & Hedström, A. K. (2023). Insufficient sleep during adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis: results from a Swedish case-control study. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, 94(5), 331-336
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insufficient sleep during adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis: results from a Swedish case-control study
2023 (English)In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 331-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Shift work, which often results in sleep deprivation and circadian desynchrony, has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed at studying the impact of sleep duration, circadian disruption and sleep quality on MS risk. Methods We used a Swedish population-based case-control study (2075 cases, 3164 controls). Aspects of sleep were associated with MS risk by calculating OR with 95% CIs using logistic regression models. Results Compared with sleeping 7-9 hours/night during adolescence, short sleep (<7 hours/night) was associated with increased risk of developing MS (OR 1.4, 95% OR 1.1-1.7). Similarly, subjective low sleep quality during adolescence increased the risk of subsequently developing MS (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3 to 1.9), whereas phase shift did not significantly influence the risk. Our findings remained similar when those who worked shifts were excluded. Conclusions Insufficient sleep and low sleep quality during adolescence seem to increase the risk of subsequently developing MS. Sufficient restorative sleep at young age, needed for adequate immune functioning, may be a preventive factor against MS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023
Keywords
sleep, multiple sclerosis, epidemiology
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215929 (URN)10.1136/jnnp-2022-330123 (DOI)000933593800001 ()36690431 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148669889 (Scopus ID)
Note

The study was supported by grants from the Swedish Research Council (2016-02349 and 2020-01998); from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (2015-00195 and 2019-00697), the Swedish Brain Foundation (FO2020-0077), AFA Insurance, European Aviation Safety Authority, Tercentenary fund of Bank of Sweden, Margaretha af Ugglas Foundation, the Swedish Foundation for MS Research and NEURO Sweden.

Available from: 2023-03-29 Created: 2023-03-29 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Åkerstedt, T., Lagerros, Y. T., Åkerstedt, A. M., Bellocco, R., Adami, H.-O., . . . Wang, H.-X. (2023). Interactive association between insomnia symptoms and sleep duration for the risk of dementia: a prospective study in the Swedish National March Cohort. Age and Ageing, 52(9), Article ID afad163.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactive association between insomnia symptoms and sleep duration for the risk of dementia: a prospective study in the Swedish National March Cohort
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2023 (English)In: Age and Ageing, ISSN 0002-0729, E-ISSN 1468-2834, Vol. 52, no 9, article id afad163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Given the importance of sleep in maintaining neurocognitive health, both sleep duration and quality might be component causes of dementia. However, the possible role of insomnia symptoms as risk factors for dementia remain uncertain. Methods: We prospectively studied 22,078 participants in the Swedish National March Cohort who were free from dementia and stroke at baseline. Occurrence of dementia was documented by national registers during a median follow-up period of 19.2 years. Insomnia symptoms and sleep duration were ascertained by Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: Compared to participants without insomnia at baseline, those who reported any insomnia symptom experienced a greater incidence of dementia during follow-up (HR 1.08, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.35). Difficulty initiating sleep versus non insomnia (HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.52), but not difficulty maintaining sleep or early morning awakening was associated with an increased risk of dementia. Short sleep duration was associated with increased risk of dementia (6 h vs. 8 h, HR 1.29, 95% CI: 1.11-1.51; 5 h vs. 8 h, HR 1.26, 95% CI: 1.00-1.57). Stratified analyses suggested that insomnia symptoms increased the risk of dementia only amongst participants with =7 h sleep (vs. non-insomnia HR 1.24, 95% CI: 1.00-1.54, P=0.05), but not amongst short sleepers (<7 h). Short sleep duration also did not further inflate the risk of dementia amongst insomniacs. Conclusion: Insomnia and short sleep duration increase the risk of dementia amongst middle-aged to older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
insomnia, sleep duration, dementia, national cohort, longitudinal study, older people
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-222235 (URN)10.1093/ageing/afad163 (DOI)001063482100001 ()37676841 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85173064876 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was supported by ZJU 100 Young Professor Project (X.T.), Åke Wiberg Foundation (X.T., M19–0266), Fredrik and Ingrid Thuring Foundation (X.T., 2019–00488) and Region Stockholm Clinical Research Appointment (Y.T.L.), the Swedish Research Council (HX.W., 2018–02998), and the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working life, and Welfare (HX.W., 2019–01120, 2020–00313).

Available from: 2023-10-11 Created: 2023-10-11 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Schwarz, J. F. A., Freidle, M., van Leeuwen, W., Åkerstedt, T. & Kecklund, G. (2023). Sleep in everyday life – relationship to mood and performance in young and older adults: a study protocol. Frontiers in Psychology, 14, Article ID 1264881.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep in everyday life – relationship to mood and performance in young and older adults: a study protocol
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2023 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 14, article id 1264881Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Laboratory based sleep deprivation studies demonstrate that lack of sleep impairs well-being and performance ability, but suggest that these effects are mitigated in older adults. Yet, much less is known whether day-to-day variations of sleep have similar consequences in the context of everyday life. This project uses an intensive longitudinal design to investigate the occurrence of day-to-day variations in sleep and their impact on mood and performance in everyday life and to examine whether effects differ between young and older adults. We aim to include 160 young (18–30 years) and 160 older adults (55–75 years) to complete a 21-day experience sampling method (ESM) protocol. During the ESM period, participants are asked to fill in (i) a brief morning questionnaire, (ii) 8 short daytime questionnaires addressing momentary well-being, sleepiness, stress, and mind wandering, followed by a 1 min cognitive task and (iii) a brief evening questionnaire, all delivered via a mobile phone application. Sleep will be measured using self-reports (daily questions) and objectively with wrist actigraphy. The impact of adult age on mean levels and intraindividual variability of sleep will be analyzed using mixed-effects location scale models. The impact of sleep on daily cognitive performance will be analyzed using multilevel linear mixed models. The relationship of sleep to mean values and variability of positive and negative affect in young and older adults will be analyzed using mixed-effects location scale modeling. The overarching purpose of the project is improving the current knowledge on the occurrence of day-to-day variations in sleep and their relationship to performance as well as positive and negative affect in young and older adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2023
Keywords
sleep, mood, performance, experience sampling method (ESM), intensive longitudinal, age
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224267 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2023.1264881 (DOI)001118947200001 ()2-s2.0-85178936186 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P19-0567:1
Note

Stockholm University Library funds the open access fee.

Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Lebedeva, A., Åkerstedt, T. & Wang, H.-X. (2023). Sleep Mediates the Association Between Stress at Work and Incident Dementia: Study From the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 78(3), 447-453
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep Mediates the Association Between Stress at Work and Incident Dementia: Study From the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe
2023 (English)In: The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, ISSN 1079-5006, E-ISSN 1758-535X, Vol. 78, no 3, p. 447-453Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Both psychosocial stress at work and sleep disturbance may predispose impaired cognitive function and dementia in later life. However, whether sleep plays a mediating role for the link between stress at work and subsequent dementia has yet to be investigated.

Methods: Data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe were used for the study. A cohort of 7 799 dementia-free individuals (aged 71.1 ± 0.2 years) were followed up for a median of 4.1 years for incident dementia. Job demand and control were estimated using questions derived from the Karasek’s Job Content Questionnaire. Sleep disturbance was ascertained by a question in the EURO-Depression scale. Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, education, cognitive test score, and other potential covariates were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of dementia in relation to different job strain levels.

Results: An interaction between job demand and sleep disturbance regarding the risk of dementia was detected. Data suggested a protective role of high-level job demand for dementia in individuals with sleep disturbance (HR [95% CI]: 0.69 [0.47, 1.00]) compared with low job demand. A 4-category job strain model based on the combination of job demand and job control levels suggested that among individuals with sleep disturbance, passive job (low demand, low control) was associated with a higher risk of dementia (1.54 [1.01, 2.34]), compared to active job (high demand, high control).

Conclusion: The link between work-related stress and risk of dementia is limited to individuals suffering sleep disturbance.

Keywords
dementia, psychosocial stress, sleep
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-207225 (URN)10.1093/gerona/glac104 (DOI)000804829600001 ()35512268 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-07-11 Created: 2022-07-11 Last updated: 2024-01-30Bibliographically approved
D'Onofrio, P., Jernelov, S., Rosen, A., Blom, K., Kaldo, V., Schwarz, J. F. A. & Åkerstedt, T. (2023). The Polysomnographical Meaning of Changed Sleep Quality-A Study of Treatment with Reduced Time in Bed. Brain Sciences, 13(10), Article ID 1426.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Polysomnographical Meaning of Changed Sleep Quality-A Study of Treatment with Reduced Time in Bed
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2023 (English)In: Brain Sciences, ISSN 2076-3425, E-ISSN 2076-3425, Vol. 13, no 10, article id 1426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Reports of poor sleep are widespread, but their link with objective sleep (polysomnography-PSG) is weak in cross-sectional studies. In contrast, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between changes in subjective and objective sleep variables using data from a study of the reduction in time in bed (TIB). Methods: One sleep recording was carried out at baseline and one at treatment week 5 (end of treatment) (N = 34). Results: The Karolinska Sleep Quality Index improved and was correlated with improvement in sleep efficiency (r = 0.41, p < 0.05) and reduction in TIB (r = -0.47, p < 0.01) and sleep latency (r = 0.36, p < 0.05). The restorative sleep index showed similar results. Improvements in the insomnia severity index (ISI) essentially lacked correlations with changes in the PSG variables. It was suggested that the latter may be due to the ISI representing a week of subjective sleep experience, of which a single PSG night may not be representative. Conclusions: It was concluded that changes in the subjective ratings of sleep are relatively well associated with changes in the PSG-based sleep continuity variables when both describe the same sleep.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2023
Keywords
subjective sleep, objective sleep, ratings, PSG, sleep restriction, sleep compression
National Category
Basic Medicine Psychology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-224246 (URN)10.3390/brainsci13101426 (DOI)001098274900001 ()37891794 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85175447227 (Scopus ID)
Note

This research was funded by FAS (Forskningsrådet för Arbetsliv och Samhälle) FAS dnr 2009-1758.

Available from: 2023-12-06 Created: 2023-12-06 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Åkerstedt, T., Schwarz, J. F. A., Theorell-Haglöw, J. & Lindberg, E. (2023). What do women mean by poor sleep?: A large population-based sample with polysomnographical indicators, inflammation, fatigue, depression, and anxiety. Sleep Medicine, 109, 219-225
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What do women mean by poor sleep?: A large population-based sample with polysomnographical indicators, inflammation, fatigue, depression, and anxiety
2023 (English)In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 109, p. 219-225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Survey studies indicate that reports of disturbed sleep are prevalent and may be prospectively linked to several major diseases. However, it is not clear what self-reported disturbed sleep represents, since the link with objective sleep measures (polysomnography; PSG) seems very weak. The purpose of the present study was to try to investigate what combination of variables (PSG, inflammation, fatigue, anxiety, depression) that would characterize those who complain of disturbed sleep. This has never been done before. Participants were 319 women in a population-based sample, who gave ratings of sleep quality, fatigue, depression, and anxiety, then had their sleep recorded at home, and had blood drawn the following morning for analysis of immune parameters. Correlations and hierarchical multivariable regression analyses were applied to the data. For ratings of difficulties initiating sleep, the associations in the final step were ß = .22, (p < .001) for fatigue, ß = 0.22 (p < .001) for anxiety, and ß = 0.17 (p < .01) for sleep latency, with R2 = 0.14. The rating of repeated awakenings was associated with fatigue (ß = 0.35, p < .001) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (ß = 0.12, p < .05), with R2 = 0.19. The rating of early morning awakenings was associated with fatigue (ß = 0.31, p < .001), total sleep time (TST) (ß = −0.20, p < .01), and CRP (ß = 0.15, p < .05), with R2 = 0.17. Interleukin-6 and Tumour Necrosis Factor were not associated with ratings of sleep problems. The results indicate that subjective fatigue, rather than objective sleep variables, is central in the perception of poor sleep, together with CRP.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
women, poor sleep, population-based sample, polysomnographical indicators, inflammation, fatigue, depression, anxiety
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-223933 (URN)10.1016/j.sleep.2023.06.029 (DOI)001071559700001 ()37478658 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165077177 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-27 Created: 2023-11-27 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved
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