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Hospital care for viral gastroenteritis in socio-economic and geographical context in Sweden 2006-2013
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Sachs’ Children and Youth Hospital, South General Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
2018 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 11, p. 2011-2018Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: We investigated socio-economic and geographical determinants of hospital care for viral gastroenteritis in young children.

METHOD: This is a register-based study in a national birth cohort of 752 078 children 0-5 years of age in Sweden during 2006-2012. Hazard ratios (HR) of time to first admission and first episode of outpatient emergency department (ED) care with a diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis were estimated with Cox regression.

RESULTS: The adjusted HRs for hospital admission with a diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis were increased when the mother was below 25 years at the birth of the child, 1.30 (95% CI: 1.24-1.35), had a short (<=9 years) education, 1.18 (95% CI: 1.12-1.23), a psychiatric disorder, 1.34 (95% CI: 1.30-1.39), and/or when parents were born outside Europe, 1.23 (95% CI: 1.18-1.29). In contrast, the disposable income of the family was only marginally associated with such hospital admissions. The pattern of HRs for outpatient ED hospital care was similar. Hospital care incidences for viral gastroenteritis differed considerably between Swedish counties.

CONCLUSION: Parental indicators associated with a lower level of health literacy increase the risk for hospital care due to gastroenteritis in young children. Information about oral rehydration should be provided in ways that are accessible to these parents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 107, no 11, p. 2011-2018
Keywords [en]
SES, Ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, Education, Gastroenteritis, Health literacy
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161753DOI: 10.1111/apa.14429ISI: 000446822800027PubMedID: 29863748OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161753DiVA, id: diva2:1261047
Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved

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