Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Is the theory of collectivity of drinking cultures valid across educational groups?
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6114-4436
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5746-7723
2021 (English)In: Drug and Alcohol Review, ISSN 0959-5236, E-ISSN 1465-3362, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 472-480Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction 

To explore whether Skog's theory of collectivity of drinking cultures is valid across groups with different socioeconomic position (SEP).

Methods

Individual‐level information on alcohol consumption and SEP for the years 2004–2014 were retrieved from the Monitoring Project; a nationally representative monthly alcohol use survey. The analytical sample consisted of 162 369 respondents aged 25–79 years. SEP was measured by education level. Alcohol use was measured by yearly volume of consumption and frequency of heavy episodic drinking (HED). Respondents were divided into six SEP‐groups based on their education level and sex. Mean yearly volume consumption and prevalence of monthly HED was calculated for each group and graphically plotted against the overall mean volume of consumption.

Results

The yearly changes in overall mean consumption during the study period reflected a collective shift in drinking across groups with basic, intermediate and high education. There were also indications that changes in overall mean consumption reflected collective shifts in the prevalence of HED across the SEP‐groups. Moreover, while the magnitude of the associations for both average volume and HED differed somewhat in strength across the SEP‐groups, they were clearly in the same, positive, direction.

Discussion and Conclusions

Our findings add support for including a socioeconomic dimension to Skog's theory of collectivity of drinking cultures. Future studies should replicate our analyses on cases and periods with more tangible changes in the price and availability of alcohol.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2021. Vol. 40, no 3, p. 472-480
Keywords [en]
average volume of alcohol consumption, heavy episodic drinking, socioeconomic position, collectivity, Sweden
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-188766DOI: 10.1111/dar.13232OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-188766DiVA, id: diva2:1516719
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareAvailable from: 2021-01-12 Created: 2021-01-12 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records

Landberg, JonasTrolldal, BjörnNorström, Thor

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Landberg, JonasTrolldal, BjörnNorström, Thor
By organisation
Department of Public Health SciencesThe Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI)
In the same journal
Drug and Alcohol Review
Sociology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 22 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf