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Insufficient sleep during adolescence and risk of multiple sclerosis: results from a Swedish case-control study
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Stress Research Institute. Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Biological psychology. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8049-8504
Number of Authors: 42023 (English)In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, ISSN 0022-3050, E-ISSN 1468-330X, Vol. 94, no 5, p. 331-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Shift work, which often results in sleep deprivation and circadian desynchrony, has been associated with increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed at studying the impact of sleep duration, circadian disruption and sleep quality on MS risk. Methods We used a Swedish population-based case-control study (2075 cases, 3164 controls). Aspects of sleep were associated with MS risk by calculating OR with 95% CIs using logistic regression models. Results Compared with sleeping 7-9 hours/night during adolescence, short sleep (<7 hours/night) was associated with increased risk of developing MS (OR 1.4, 95% OR 1.1-1.7). Similarly, subjective low sleep quality during adolescence increased the risk of subsequently developing MS (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.3 to 1.9), whereas phase shift did not significantly influence the risk. Our findings remained similar when those who worked shifts were excluded. Conclusions Insufficient sleep and low sleep quality during adolescence seem to increase the risk of subsequently developing MS. Sufficient restorative sleep at young age, needed for adequate immune functioning, may be a preventive factor against MS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2023. Vol. 94, no 5, p. 331-336
Keywords [en]
sleep, multiple sclerosis, epidemiology
National Category
Clinical Medicine
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-215929DOI: 10.1136/jnnp-2022-330123ISI: 000933593800001PubMedID: 36690431Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85148669889OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-215929DiVA, id: diva2:1746686
Note

The study was supported by grants from the Swedish Research Council (2016-02349 and 2020-01998); from the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare (2015-00195 and 2019-00697), the Swedish Brain Foundation (FO2020-0077), AFA Insurance, European Aviation Safety Authority, Tercentenary fund of Bank of Sweden, Margaretha af Ugglas Foundation, the Swedish Foundation for MS Research and NEURO Sweden.

Available from: 2023-03-29 Created: 2023-03-29 Last updated: 2024-01-31Bibliographically approved

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Åkerstedt, Torbjörn

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