Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Networks and Success: Access and Use of Social Capital among Young Adults in Sweden
Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8819-713X
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The thesis explores the role of social capital in shaping inequality among young adults. Social capital is defined as resources embedded in a social network and the thesis investigates differences in access to social capital, and the effects in the labor market and the housing market. The thesis consists of four empirical studies and an introductory chapter that develops the theoretical and empirical background. The four empirical studies use a Swedish survey titled “Social Capital and Labor Market Integration” that includes individuals born in 1990 living in Sweden. A gross sample based on three subsamples was selected based on the country of birth of the respondents’ parents (Sweden, former Yugoslavia, or Iran). The survey consists of two waves of panel data and most respondents were 19 years old at the time of the first survey and 22 at the time of the second. The four studies investigate: (1) the effect of social class and migration background on access to social capital through national and transnational ties, (2) the effect of socioeconomic segregation in schools and neighborhoods on access to social capital through occupational networks and close friendship ties, (3) the effect of social capital in the process of labor market entry, and (4) the effect of social capital on the likelihood to move away from parents. All four studies measure social capital with ego network measures and the main measurement is the position generator that asks the respondent about contacts in occupational positions spanning the socioeconomic structure. Results show that family background factors and socioeconomic segregation affects access to social capital, and that social capital affects labor market and housing market outcomes. The thesis concludes that social capital is an important factor to understand unequal outcomes among young adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Department of Sociology, Stockholm University , 2017. , 47 p.
Series
Stockholm studies in sociology, ISSN 0491-0885 ; 69
Keyword [en]
Social capital, labour market, housing market, young adults, social class, immigration background, neighbourhood
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142740ISBN: 978-91-7649-846-0 (print)ISBN: 978-91-7649-847-7 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-142740DiVA: diva2:1092861
Public defence
2017-06-16, Nordenskiöldsalen, Geovetenskapens hus, Svante Arrhenius väg 12, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
LIFEINCON
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 1: Accepted. Paper 2: Manuscript. Paper 3: Manuscript. Paper 4: Manuscript.

Available from: 2017-05-22 Created: 2017-05-04 Last updated: 2017-05-18Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. The intersection of class origin and immigration background in structuring social capital: The role of transnational ties
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The intersection of class origin and immigration background in structuring social capital: The role of transnational ties
(English)In: British Journal of Sociology, ISSN 0007-1315, E-ISSN 1468-4446Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
Abstract [en]

The study investigates inequalities in access to social capital based on social class origin and immigration background and examines the role of transnational ties in explaining these differences. Social capital is measured with a position generator methodology that separates between national and transnational contacts in a sample of young adults in Sweden with three parental backgrounds: at least one parent born in Iran or Yugoslavia, or two Sweden-born parents. The results show that having socioeconomically advantaged parents is associated with higher levels of social capital. Children of immigrants are found to have a greater access to social capital compared to individuals with native background, and the study shows that this is related to transnational contacts, parents’ education and social class in their country of origin. Children of immigrants tend to have more contacts abroad, while there is little difference in the amount of contacts living in Sweden across the three groups. It is concluded that knowledge about immigration group resources help us predict its member’s social capital, but that the analysis also needs to consider how social class trajectories and migration jointly structure national and transnational contacts.

National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142602 (URN)
Projects
LIFEINCON
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-17
2. Socioeconomic Segregation and Access to Social Capital: The effect of schools and neighborhoods on the social capital of young adults
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Socioeconomic Segregation and Access to Social Capital: The effect of schools and neighborhoods on the social capital of young adults
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates how schools and neighborhoods structure the social capital of young adults. Two waves of panel data are used to study a sample of young adults in Sweden. Social capital is defined as access to resources through a social network and measured by the number of the five closest friends in higher education and employment, as well as the extensity and class composition of the occupational positions respondents have access to. The result demonstrates that close friends very often share school context and somewhat less often neighborhood context, and that the socioeconomic composition of both upper secondary schools and neighborhoods structures an individual’s access to social capital. In addition, variation between the two waves in the neighborhood context composition is shown to lead to change in the socioeconomic composition of the network. Results indicate a substantial persistence of context effects over time. School friendships formed during adolescence continue to be important into early adulthood, and the effect of context composition is maintained over time. Thus, it is concluded that the “growing up context” matters for social capital in early adulthood.

Keyword
Social Capital, Position Generator, Social Class, Socioeconomic Segregation, Neighbourhood Effects, Context Composition
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142580 (URN)
Projects
LIFEINCON
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved
3. You can do it: The effect of social capital on self-efficacy, information, and job search in the process of labor market entry
Open this publication in new window or tab >>You can do it: The effect of social capital on self-efficacy, information, and job search in the process of labor market entry
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Social capital is known to be related to labor market outcomes, but less is known about the pathways between resources and labor market outcomes. To improve our understanding of the role of social capital in the process of labor market entry among young adults, this paper analyze whether social capital is related to labor market outcomes, mediating variables, and job search method. Analyzing two waves of panel data on young adults in Sweden, the results show that social capital is related to getting a job and that the effect varies according to the contact’s position. Social capital is positively related to the number of job leads, higher labor market self-efficacy, and the substitution of formal for informal job search. In conclusion, the labor market effects of access to social capital include both network mechanisms, such as information, and individual mechanisms, such as better self-efficacy.

Keyword
Job search, Social capital, Labor market, Young adults, Self-efficacy
National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142585 (URN)
Projects
LIFEINCON
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved
4. Nest leaving and social capital: channels, housing tenures and resources
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nest leaving and social capital: channels, housing tenures and resources
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Housing shortage can make it difficult for young adults to move away from their parents. This paper investigates nest leaving to understand resources and channels young adults use to move away from parents, with focus on the role of social capital and informal channels. Results show that both economic and social capital have positive effects on nest leaving. While social capital is linked to use of contacts and informal, “secondhand”, rental agreements, often transmitted via contacts, economic capital is instead related to formal housing tenure such as firsthand rental contracts and house ownership. Parental income does not have an effect on nest leaving, but is associated with a higher likelihood of living in an owned apartment. The study also indicates that immigrants are more likely to live with their parents, and discrimination as well as social capital shortage are discussed as possible explanations. The paper concludes that access to both economic and social capital make it more likely to move away from parents, but that each operates through a different channel and leads to different housing tenure.

National Category
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-142723 (URN)
Projects
LIFEINCON
Available from: 2017-05-03 Created: 2017-05-03 Last updated: 2017-05-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

Networks and Success(494 kB)125 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 494 kBChecksum SHA-512
d0c110a68f4106c70d5be38495ed928735367514a31526e5ea4b838c64cdc69c6f834fb49101216a9df2d712abe4d7aae61f5cca9ba9040e7e8453835e2c672b
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Andersson, Anton B.
By organisation
Department of Sociology
Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 125 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1983 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf