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Particulate matter air pollution components and risk for lung cancer
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Number of Authors: 542016 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 87, p. 66-73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Particulate matter (PM) air pollution is a human lung carcinogen; however, the components responsible have not been identified. We assessed the associations between PM components and lung cancer incidence. Methods: We used data from 14 cohort studies in eight European countries. We geocoded baseline addresses and assessed air pollution with land-use regression models for eight elements (Cu, Fe, K, Ni, S, Si, V and Zn) in size fractions of PM2.5 and PM10. We used Cox regression models with adjustment for potential confounders for cohort-specific analyses and random effect models for meta-analysis. Results: The 245,782 cohort members contributed 3,229,220 person-years at risk. During follow-up (mean, 13.1 years), 1878 incident cases of lung cancer were diagnosed. In the meta-analyses, elevated hazard ratios (HRs) for lung cancer were associated with all elements except V; none was statistically significant In analyses restricted to participants who did not change residence during follow-up, statistically significant associations were found for PM2.5 Cu (HR, 125; 95% Cl, 1.01-1.53 per 5 ng/m(3)), PM10 Zn (1.28; 1.02-1.59 per 20 ng/m3), PMio S (1.58; 1.03-2.44 per 200 ng/m(3)), PM10 Ni (1.59; 1.12-2.26 per 2 ng/m(3)) and PM10K (1.17; 1.02-1.33 per 100 ng/m(3)). In two-pollutant models, associations between PMio and PM2.5 and lung cancer were largely explained by PM2.5 S. Conclusions: This study indicates that the association between PM in air pollution and lung cancer can be attributed to various PM components and sources. PM containing S and Ni might be particularly important.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 87, p. 66-73
Keywords [en]
Air pollution, Particulate matter, Sulfur, Nickel, Cohort study, Lung cancer
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-159615DOI: 10.1016/j.envint.2015.11.007ISI: 000368951700008PubMedID: 26641521OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-159615DiVA, id: diva2:1246021
Available from: 2018-09-06 Created: 2018-09-06 Last updated: 2018-09-06Bibliographically approved

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Andersen, Z. J.Stafoggia, M.Nieuwenhuijsen, M.Sorensen, M.Tjonneland, A.Eeftens, M.Galassi, C.Cesaroni, G.Badaloni, C.Forastiere, F.Penell, J.Korek, M.Nagel, G.Naccarati, A.Katsouyanni, K.
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Environment International
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