Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Evidence for selective bacterial community structuring on microplastics
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry. Aquabiota Water Research AB, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7082-0990
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
Show others and affiliations
Number of Authors: 82018 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 2796-2808Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In aquatic ecosystems, microplastics are a relatively new anthropogenic substrate that can readily be colonized by biofilm-forming organisms. To examine the effects of substrate type on microbial community assembly, we exposed ambient Baltic bacterioplankton to plastic substrates commonly found in marine environments (polyethylene, polypropylene and polystyrene) as well as native (cellulose) and inert (glass beads) particles for 2 weeks under controlled conditions. The source microbial communities and those of the biofilms were analyzed by Illumina sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene libraries. All biofilm communities displayed lower diversity and evenness compared with the source community, suggesting substrate-driven selection. Moreover, the plastics-associated communities were distinctly different from those on the non-plastic substrates. Whereas plastics hosted greater than twofold higher abundance of Burkholderiales, the non-plastic substrates had a significantly higher proportion of Actinobacteria and Cytophagia. Variation in the community structure, but not the cell abundance, across the treatments was strongly linked to the substrate hydrophobicity. Thus, microplastics host distinct bacterial communities, at least during early successional stages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 20, no 8, p. 2796-2808
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161146DOI: 10.1111/1462-2920.14120ISI: 000445184600009PubMedID: 29614210OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161146DiVA, id: diva2:1256910
Available from: 2018-10-18 Created: 2018-10-18 Last updated: 2020-02-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ogonowski, MartinMotiei, AsaIninbergs, KarolinaHell, EvaGerdes, ZandraUdekwu, Klas I.Bacsik, ZoltanGorokhova, Elena
By organisation
Department of Environmental Science and Analytical ChemistryDepartment of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren InstituteDepartment of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK)
In the same journal
Environmental Microbiology
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 44 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf