Endre søk
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Genomic and Strontium Isotope Variation Reveal Immigration Patterns in a Viking Age Town
Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur. Stockholms universitet, Science for Life Laboratory (SciLifeLab).
Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
Stockholms universitet, Humanistiska fakulteten, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
Vise andre og tillknytning
Rekke forfattare: 152018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 28, nr 17, s. 2730-2738Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The impact of human mobility on the northern European urban populations during the Viking and Early Middle Ages and its repercussions in Scandinavia itself are still largely unexplored. Our study of the demographics in the final phase of the Viking era is the first comprehensive multidisciplinary investigation that includes genetics, isotopes, archaeology, and osteology on a larger scale. This early Christian dataset is particularly important as the earlier common pagan burial tradition during the Iron Age was cremation, hindering large-scale DNA analyses. We present genome-wide sequence data from 23 individuals from the 10th to 12th century Swedish town of Sigtuna. The data revealed high genetic diversity among the early urban residents. The observed variation exceeds the genetic diversity in distinct modern-day and Iron Age groups of central and northern Europe. Strontium isotope data suggest mixed local and non-local origin of the townspeople. Our results uncover the social system underlying the urbanization process of the Viking World of which mobility was an intricate part and was comparable between males and females. The inhabitants of Sigtuna were heterogeneous in their genetic affinities, probably reflecting both close and distant connections through an established network, confirming that early urbanization processes in northern Europe were driven by migration.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2018. Vol. 28, nr 17, s. 2730-2738
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-161096DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.06.053ISI: 000444190900038PubMedID: 30146150OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-161096DiVA, id: diva2:1262166
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-11-09 Laget: 2018-11-09 Sist oppdatert: 2019-01-21bibliografisk kontrollert

Open Access i DiVA

Fulltekst mangler i DiVA

Andre lenker

Forlagets fulltekstPubMed

Søk i DiVA

Av forfatter/redaktør
Krzewińska, MajaKjellström, AnnaZachrisson, TorunKılınç, Gülşah MerveStorå, JanGötherström, Anders
Av organisasjonen
I samme tidsskrift
Current Biology

Søk utenfor DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Totalt: 80 treff
RefereraExporteraLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annet format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annet språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf