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Shading and simulated grazing increase the sulphide pool and methane emission in a tropical seagrass meadow
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. University of Dodoma, Tanzania.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
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Number of Authors: 72018 (English)In: Marine Pollution Bulletin, ISSN 0025-326X, E-ISSN 1879-3363, Vol. 134, p. 89-93Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Though seagrass meadows are among the most productive habitats in the world, contributing substantially to long-term carbon storage, studies of the effects of critical disturbances on the fate of carbon sequestered in the sediment and biomass of these meadows are scarce. In a manipulative in situ experiment, we studied the effects of successive loss of seagrass biomass as a result of shading and simulated grazing at two intensity levels on sulphide (H2S) content and methane (CH4) emission in a tropical seagrass meadow in Zanzibar (Tanzania). In all disturbed treatments, we found a several-fold increase in both the sulphide concentration of the sediment pore-water and the methane emissions from the sediment surface (except for CH4 emissions in the low-shading treatment). This could be due to the ongoing degradation of belowground biomass shed by the seagrass plants, supporting the production of both sulphate-reducing bacteria and methanogens, possibly exacerbated by the loss of downwards oxygen transport via seagrass plants. The worldwide rapid loss of seagrass areas due to anthropogenic activities may therefore have significant effects on carbon sink-source relationships within coastal seas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2018. Vol. 134, p. 89-93
Keywords [en]
Seagrass meadows, Disturbances, Hydrogen sulphide, Methane
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-162047DOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.09.005ISI: 000447116800010PubMedID: 28935361OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-162047DiVA, id: diva2:1267857
Available from: 2018-12-04 Created: 2018-12-04 Last updated: 2020-02-06Bibliographically approved

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Gullström, MartinDeyanova, DianaDahl, MartinBjörk, Mats
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