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Remineralization rate of terrestrial DOC as inferred from CO2 supersaturated coastal waters
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8280-4018
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre. University of Helsinki, Finland.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0649-5599
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre, Baltic Nest Institute.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4215-9322
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2019 (English)In: Biogeosciences Discussions, ISSN 1810-6277, E-ISSN 1810-6285, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 863-879Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coastal seas receive large amounts of terrestrially derived organic carbon (OC). The fate of this carbon, and its impact on the marine environment, is however poorly understood. Here we combine underway CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) measurements with coupled 3D hydrodynamical-biogeochemical modelling to investigate whether remineralization of terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (tDOC) can explain CO2 supersaturated surface waters in the Gulf of Bothnia, a subarctic estuary. We find that a substantial remineralization of tDOC, and that a strong tDOC induced light attenuation dampening the primary production, is required to reproduce the observed CO2 supersaturated waters in the nearshore areas. A removal rate of tDOC of the order of one year, estimated in a previous modelling study in the same area, gives a good agreement between modelled and observed pCO2. The remineralization rate is on the same order as bacterial degradation rates calculated from published incubation experiments, suggesting that this remineralization could be caused by bacterial degradation. Furthermore, the observed high pCO2 values during the ice covered season argues against photochemical degradation as the main removal mechanism. All of the remineralized tDOC is outgassed to the atmosphere in the model, turning the northernmost part of the Gulf of Bothnia to a source of atmospheric CO2.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 16, no 3, p. 863-879
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Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-164515DOI: 10.5194/bg-2018-333ISI: 000459214200002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-164515DiVA, id: diva2:1279556
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2019-01-16 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved

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Fransner, FilippaHumborg, ChristophGustafsson, ErikNycander, Jonas
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Department of Meteorology Stockholm University Baltic Sea CentreBaltic Nest Institute
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