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Positivity Effect and Working Memory Performance Remains Intact in Older Adults After Sleep Deprivation
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Biologisk psykologi. Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet.
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Psykologiska institutionen, Biologisk psykologi.
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.ORCID-id: 0000-0003-3998-1494
Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stressforskningsinstitutet. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
Vise andre og tillknytning
Rekke forfattare: 72019 (engelsk)Inngår i: Frontiers in Psychology, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 10, artikkel-id 605Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Older adults perform better in tasks which include positive stimuli, referred to as the positivity effect. However, recent research suggests that the positivity effect could be attenuated when additional challenges such as stress or cognitive demands are introduced. Moreover, it is well established that older adults are relatively resilient to many of the adverse effects of sleep deprivation. Our aim was to investigate if the positivity effect in older adults is affected by one night of total sleep deprivation using an emotional working memory task.

Methods: A healthy sample of 48 older adults (60-72 years) was either sleep deprived for one night (n = 24) or had a normal night's sleep (n = 24). They performed an emotional working memory n-back (n = 1 and 3) task containing positive, negative and neutral pictures.

Results: Performance in terms of accuracy and reaction times was best for positive stimuli and worst for negative stimuli. This positivity effect was not altered by sleep deprivation. Results also showed that, despite significantly increased sleepiness, there was no effect of sleep deprivation on working memory performance. A working memory load x valence interaction on the reaction times revealed that the beneficial effect of positive stimuli was only present in the 1-back condition.

Conclusion: While the positivity effect and general working memory abilities in older adults are intact after one night of sleep deprivation, increased cognitive demand attenuates the positivity effect on working memory speed.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
2019. Vol. 10, artikkel-id 605
Emneord [en]
sleep deprivation, positivity bias, emotion, older adults, sustained wakefulness, working memory, executive functions, affect
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-168364DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2019.00605ISI: 000462127700001PubMedID: 30967813OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-168364DiVA, id: diva2:1315087
Tilgjengelig fra: 2019-05-10 Laget: 2019-05-10 Sist oppdatert: 2022-03-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Inngår i avhandling
1. Processing affective information after sleep loss
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Processing affective information after sleep loss
2022 (engelsk)Doktoravhandling, med artikler (Annet vitenskapelig)
Abstract [en]

It is not fully understood why we need to sleep, although it is evident that sleep loss has consequences for many emotional and cognitive functions. The last couple of decades, sleep researchers have been increasingly devoted to better understand the relationship between sleep and affect. However, it is still poorly understood how sleep deprivation influences the way in which affective information is processed. The aim of this thesis was to investigate if there is a bias towards affective information after sleep deprivation and whether such bias influence information processing.

Study I tested reinforcement learning from positive as compared to negative feedback after two nights of sleep restriction. There were no indications of the expected reward-seeking behavior in generalized learning or in the learning strategy. A slowing in learning rate inferred from computational modeling was observed primarily for negative feedback. This could be indicative of a slowing in memory integration. It is unclear if the dopamine alterations proposed to cause reward-seeking behavior after total sleep deprivation are also implicated after sleep restriction.

Study II examined the neurophysiological response of the competition of attention between unpleasant and neutral pictures after two nights of sleep restriction. We found no alterations of sleep restriction on attention in relation to picture valence, or on executive control of attention. Despite observations of an increased sleepiness, an impaired sustained attention, and reduced positive affect, the few hours of allowed sleep may have been enough to counteract an affective bias and an executive control impairment.

Study III tested if one night of total sleep deprivation altered working memory for positive, negative, or neutral pictures using two levels of working memory load. Results showed that working memory accuracy was generally impaired after sleep deprivation, independent of picture valence. However, in the sleep deprived group we observed faster responses to positive and slower responses to negative pictures. These results could indicate a bias towards both positive and negative pictures, but with opposite consequences on working memory speed.

Study IV used the same protocol as Study III to combinedly test two common findings among older adults: That they prioritize positive over negative stimuli (the positivity effect), and that they are less affected by sleep deprivation. Working memory performance was overall better for positive than negative pictures, with no differences between the sleep conditions. This positivity effect was only present in the low working memory load condition. These results show that even after a state-dependent challenge such as sleep deprivation, the positivity effect remains in older adults, at least when working memory load is low.

Overall, the Studies in this thesis demonstrate signs of affective bias as well as lack thereof after total and partial sleep deprivation. The use of a diverse set of tasks and methodology may have contributed to the discrepancies in the findings, but it also highlights that we have yet to fully understand how lack of sleep may influence the processing of affectively valuable information.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Stockholm: Department of Psychology, Stockholm University, 2022. s. 95
Emneord
sleep deprivation, sleep restriction, affective bias, emotional working memory, positivity effect, sömnbrist, sömnrestriktion, emotionellt bias, arbetsminne, positivitetseffekten
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
psykologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-202952 (URN)978-91-7911-828-0 (ISBN)978-91-7911-829-7 (ISBN)
Disputas
2022-05-13, Lärosal 24, Albano Hus 4, Albanovägen 12, Stockholm, 10:00 (engelsk)
Opponent
Veileder
Tilgjengelig fra: 2022-04-20 Laget: 2022-03-24 Sist oppdatert: 2022-04-04bibliografisk kontrollert

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