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Processes and earthquakes - investigating Swedish students conceptions and relational thinking
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
2019 (English)In: Book of Abstracts: EARLI 2019, 2019, p. 92-92Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to investigate students´ conceptions of causes, processes and consequences of earthquakes in relation to plate boundaries. We also focus on students´ conceptions of earthquakes in relation to society, and why some societies are more affected than others. Data consist of 134 written responses on two assignments from the Swedish national test in geography with 12-13 year old students. The responses were sampled and then analysed using content and thematic analysis. Results show that the majority of students relate earthquakes to convergent boundaries rather than to divergent or transform boundaries, holding alternative conceptions on the processes involved. Furthermore, students often describe different geological events such as tsunami and volcanoes, but rarely explain where and how earthquakes occur. The results also show that many students have developed a geographical relational understanding on why consequenses of earthquakes are more severe in poor countries by addressing socioeconomic processes including weak buildings or lack of preparedness related to poor economy, whereas some students hold alternative conceptions relating earthquakes in poor countries directly to a general increase in heat, proximity to the equator, or presence of plate boundaries in only poor countries. We believe these finding will help provide insights for teachers when designing classroom instruction aiming at changing alternative conceptions and strenghtening scientific understanding.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. p. 92-92
Keywords [en]
Content analysis, Geography, Misconceptions, Secondary education
National Category
Didactics
Research subject
Geography, Physical Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-184430OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-184430DiVA, id: diva2:1461307
Conference
18th Biennial EARLI Conference for Research on Learning and Instruction: Thinking tomorrow´s education-learning from the past, in the present and for the future, Aachen, Germany, August 12-16, 2019
Available from: 2020-08-26 Created: 2020-08-26 Last updated: 2022-02-25Bibliographically approved

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Arrhenius, MattiasLundholm, Cecilia

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf