Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Estimating the global potential of water harvesting from successful case studies
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1600-5450
Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7335-5679
Show others and affiliations
2020 (English)In: Global Environmental Change, ISSN 0959-3780, E-ISSN 1872-9495, Vol. 63, article id 102121Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Water harvesting has been widely applied in different social-ecological contexts, proving to be a valuable approach to sustainable intensification of agriculture. Global estimates of the potential of water harvesting are generally based on purely biophysical assessments and mostly neglect the socioeconomic dimension of agriculture. This neglect becomes a critical factor for the feasibility and effectiveness of policy and funding efforts to mainstream this practice. This study uses archetype analysis to systematically identify social-ecological regions worldwide based on >160 successful cases of local water harvesting implementation. We delineate six archetypal regions which capture the specific social-ecological conditions of the case studies. The archetypes cover 19% of current global croplands with hotspots in large portions of East Africa and Southeast Asia. We estimate that the adoption of water harvesting in these cropland areas can increase crop production up to 60–100% in Uganda, Burundi, Tanzania and India. The results of this study can complement conventional biophysical analysis on the potential of these practices and guide policy development at global and regional scales. The methodological approach can be also replicated at finer scales to guide the improvement of rainfed agricultural.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2020. Vol. 63, article id 102121
Keywords [en]
Water harvesting, Archetype analysis, Sustainable agricultural intensification, Food security, Case studies
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:su:diva-185717DOI: 10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2020.102121ISI: 000556563400030OAI: oai:DiVA.org:su-185717DiVA, id: diva2:1473216
Available from: 2020-10-05 Created: 2020-10-05 Last updated: 2022-03-23Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Sustainable Land and Water Management for a Greener Future: Large-scale insights in support of Agroecological Intensification
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Land and Water Management for a Greener Future: Large-scale insights in support of Agroecological Intensification
2020 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The challenge of producing more food in times of climate change, degraded land and scares water resources is calling for a radical transformation of agriculture. Sustainable agricultural intensification is the process of increasing the productivity of farms while preserving functional ecosystems. A range of sustainable land and water management (SLWM) practices and approaches to sustainable intensification have been successfully implemented at the local scale during the last decades, but adoption rate remains low due to a variety of barriers and lack of effective approaches from authorities at larger scales (national to global). Despite the wealth of local successes, promoting and realizing the widespread uptake of SLWM requires large scale understanding of the potential and challenges of adoption of SLWM, which is currently lacking. This thesis bridges outcomes of successful implementation of SLWM from local cases to large scale social-ecological patterns, showing where and what is the potential of SLWM to contribute to sustainable agricultural intensification and the barriers to achieve it. The methodological approach and the results presented in this thesis aim at providing insights to improve current assessments of sustainable intensification of agriculture and practical guidance to planning, policy making and funding interventions to promote the widespread adoption of SLWM.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, 2020. p. 37
National Category
Environmental Sciences Agricultural Science Climate Research
Research subject
Sustainability Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:su:diva-185721 (URN)978-91-7911-310-0 (ISBN)978-91-7911-311-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2020-11-20, rum 306, hus 2 B, Roslagsvägen 101, Kräftriket, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2020-10-27 Created: 2020-10-05 Last updated: 2022-03-01Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records

Piemontese, LuigiCastelli, GiulioFetzer, IngoBarron, JennieJaramillo, Fernando

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Piemontese, LuigiCastelli, GiulioFetzer, IngoBarron, JennieJaramillo, Fernando
By organisation
Stockholm Resilience CentreDepartment of Physical Geography
In the same journal
Global Environmental Change
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 49 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf